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HomeOff Topics › Replacing fence: Wood or Galvanized steel posts
12-31-2017 01:47 PM  8 months agoPost 1
sjgusmc21

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San Antonio, Texas

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In the next 6-9 months I am going to have to start placing my fence. Its 14+ years old, and was cheaply put up with the house when it was new. I am debating between putting wooden posts up or galvanized steel 2" posts. Anyone have any experience with this? I am leaning hard to the metal posts for longevity. Thanks.

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12-31-2017 02:58 PM  8 months agoPost 2
Lotus7

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Cape Town, South Africa

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I have noticed , in my travels in USA, that most fences are timber and as such could require maintenance at times
What I have never seen there was , what is known here as Vibracrete fences
Very quick to install and requires virually no maintenance . Probably the most popular fence in South Africa, mostly concrete or stone chip finish and various top panels are available
Are they allowed in USA ?

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12-31-2017 03:35 PM  8 months agoPost 3
Peter Wales

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Orlando Fl

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All my fences are vinyl. No maintenance except the occasional pressure wash if they get moldy. They last fine in the Florida sun. I have about 100 ft of 6' privacy fencing and a few miles of 3 bar fencing to keep the horses in.

Peter Wales
http://scalehelicopters.org

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12-31-2017 04:00 PM  8 months agoPost 4
tadawson

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Lewisville, TX

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I have seen the concrete fences in Texas, and the ones I have seen are generally pretty degraded and ugly. Not sure the age, but apparently they don't hold up as well as one might think . . . I think wet and freezing (yeah, not that common here, but it happens) tends to break up the panels . . . couple that with expense, and just not that popular. Oh, and I've never seen one in more northern climates.

Friends don't let friends become electrotarded . . . .

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12-31-2017 04:01 PM  8 months agoPost 5
Lotus7

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Cape Town, South Africa

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The question was more , are the precast concrete fences available in USA, or even allowed = Would you need an engineers certificate if they are allowed

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12-31-2017 04:39 PM  8 months agoPost 6
tadawson

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Lewisville, TX

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Which I answered yes, allowed, and yes, available. Apparently not much desire, and possibly durability issues, so not common . . . I had considered one for my yard a while back, and cost was insane at the time, far cheaper to do good preserved wood and maintain it . . .

Friends don't let friends become electrotarded . . . .

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12-31-2017 06:35 PM  8 months agoPost 7
Lotus7

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Cape Town, South Africa

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Your response came as I was typing , so missed it

Mine is now 35 years old , basically no wear or weathering
Climate is Socal style though . No snow and no frost
They really are the go to fence for back and side boundaries = streets mostly powdercoated steel palisades

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12-31-2017 09:28 PM  8 months agoPost 8
ticedoff8

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Morgan Hill, CA. USA

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I would not go with the metal posts

Anything attached to the metal will require drilling or welding and that provides a foothold for rusting.

You don't tell us how much fence, how high or if this is a subdivision

If it is a subdivision, you share the fence with your neighbor(s) and they will pay 1/2 of the costs for their common part of the fence.
They will also have a say in the type of fence and the material

You may have a great relationship with the neighbors that share common fence sections and it will all work out.
Or... not.

I had to replace 350' of "privacy" fencing on 3 sides that is shared with 4 neighbors.
We went with pressure treated 4x4 fence posts (16" depth with concrete footing) and 6' high redwood panels.
There were minor differences between the 3 sides.

We took the cost per foot of the fence that was shared with each neighbor and split the cost in 1/2.

Believe 1/2 of what you see and none of what you hear.
Fake News will be the downfall of our Republic!

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01-01-2018 12:55 AM  8 months agoPost 9
RM3

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Killeen, Texas - USA

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dont do galvanized posts... they bend with heavy wind, and stay bent, trying to bend them back tends to result in them cracking open... and here in Central texas we have the wind storms come April thru June... they are strong yes, but once they start to bend, they usually fold like a plastic soda straw... the only way to make them strong is to fill them with concrete after they are set. then your stuck having to drill them...

the best Ive seen was what my dad used... a bunch of used water well drill pipe, set into concrete, filled with concrete and then painted.... tough as can be... with a cedar fence attached via 2x4s that are bolted to welded on studs... it cost more yes... but the fence has been standing for about 30 years now...

treated 4x4s are cheap and last a good 10 plus years with minimal care... but it depends on the ground, weather etc. wet weather or a sprinkler system that is always wetting them will degrade them fast.

showing a preference will only get you into trouble, 90% of everything is crap...

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01-01-2018 01:23 PM  8 months agoPost 10
sjgusmc21

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San Antonio, Texas

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Thank you all for your replies. I live in a HOA, so it will have to match my current setup.

As for specs, it will be your standard 6 foot privacy fence. I cannot afford cedar, so I will be using 1 in. x 5-1/2 in. x 6 ft. Pressure-Treated Pine Dog-Ear Fence Pickets. Of course, I will stain them after they are up and they have dried out. This side of my yard will be about 90 feet.

I have a while (I hope) to make my decision.

RM3, when you say this, what are you talking about drilling them?

the only way to make them strong is to fill them with concrete after they are set. then your stuck having to drill them...

I would be using Simpson 12 gauge 2 in Pipe Grip Tie's to attach them to the wood 2x4's. I don't see any drilling involved. Am I missing something? Do like the thought of filling them with concrete though...never thought about that....

Regardless, happy New Year to you all and again, thank you for the suggestions and help.

Late note: Anyone ever use Oz-Posts?
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Oz-Post...30161/202400933

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01-01-2018 04:29 PM  8 months agoPost 11
jds2000

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The GIANT side of Texas

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I've been in and around the fence business for most of my life. I would never use wood post period. The correct size term for fencing is 2 3/8" OD. Plumbers use ID fencers and fence suppliers use OD. If you plan on putting a concrete curb along the fence line use sch 40 or DQ 40. The latter comes in a few different trade names ie CQ 40 DQ 40 ect. It has a higher tensil strength than schedule 40 but just go with the lesser expensive of the 2. If you are not putting a curb and your staying with no higher then 6ft and if your in a area with houses all for wind breaks you you can get by with CQ 20. The "Simpson" brackets are a good product and you don't have to drill anything into the post. The replies telling you not to use metal post must have used the metal post found in box stores which are NOT heavy enough period. It is best to concrete them at least 30" in the ground and don't have more than 6" of the treated pickets above the rail and no more than 10" below the botom rail & split the difference with the middle rail. More than that above or below will result in some severe warpage with the treated lumber. Use 8ft post to achieve these measurments.

One Truth

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01-01-2018 11:45 PM  8 months agoPost 12
sjgusmc21

rrApprentice

San Antonio, Texas

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jds2000, Thank you for the detailed explanation! No, there will be no concrete curb. Is this what you are referring to?

CL-2585-HF20 2-1/2" x 8'-6" x .095

http://www.hooverfence.com/catalog/cpage21.htm

or

https://www.mccoys.com/shop/8-x-2-3...e095/p.06090603

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01-01-2018 11:58 PM  8 months agoPost 13
jds2000

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The GIANT side of Texas

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See if you can locate a Master Halco or Jamieson fence supply store and go by and let them show you a CS 20 and a schedule 40 or CQ 40. Ask them to show what the .095 looks like in comparison.

One Truth

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01-02-2018 04:53 PM  8 months agoPost 14
RM3

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Killeen, Texas - USA

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I don't see any drilling involved. Am I missing something? Do like the thought of filling them with concrete though...never thought about that....
One house I had a while back drilled into them to avoid using brackets to attach the rails to a 2x4 which was then bolted to the post... they were filled with concrete by the previous owner.... dude must have been a bit OCD...

showing a preference will only get you into trouble, 90% of everything is crap...

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01-03-2018 07:36 AM  8 months agoPost 15
dilberteinstein

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texas - USA

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If you use pipe be sure to fill with concrete or put a cap on the pipe.

If you do not, the pipe can fill with water, freeze and burst the pipe.

My galvanized steel (with cap) has lasted 20 years with no problem. One of my neighbors failed to cap his and every post burst at the base.

We have limestone here and it is not fun to drill. I used a Earthquake Hole Digger and it wouldn't budge the limestone until I rigged a chisel on the auger to serve as a breaker.

If your fence building skills are anywhere near your house add-on skills, this will be a piece of cake.

90% of life is "showing up"

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