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HomeAircraftHelicopterHelicopter Main Discussion › cold lipo storage
11-07-2016 04:51 PM  24 months agoPost 1
wrongler

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Brewerton, New York

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Anyone leave lipos out in a shed for the winter in extreme cold weather in the north east (upstate ny.)
Thoughts and experience would be appreciated!
Thanks,
Bill

Bill Whittaker

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11-07-2016 05:53 PM  24 months agoPost 2
Dr.Ben

rrMaster

Richmond, VA, USA

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Refrigerator temp range 36-45D is fine. (Sub)freezing temps are likely ill advised.

Ben Minor

Peak Aircraft/Team Minicopter Team Futaba Team Kontronik USA

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11-07-2016 07:25 PM  24 months agoPost 3
Heli_Splatter

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USA

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If is good enough for your beer, it is good enough for your batteries. I keep mine at house temperature.

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11-07-2016 08:59 PM  24 months agoPost 4
wrongler

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Brewerton, New York

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Hi Ben,
Do you have a reason for not leaving them in a shed for winter? I have read many articles and no one can explain why they shouldn't be left in frozen temperatures? I do know that sometimes in shipping they are exposed to extreme cold temp.
Just looking for anyone that has done this in the past and what their experience was.

Bill Whittaker

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11-07-2016 09:57 PM  24 months agoPost 5
ICUR1-2

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Ottawa, Ontario

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If you let them freeze and then reheat them too fast and /or too frequently you have a possibility of condensation forming.

Mine stored at 3.8v at room temp until needed.
If they sit for a month I put the charger on and cycle them.

I would not let them freeze,usually bad things happen to frozen stuff

spending time, paying attention

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11-08-2016 03:46 AM  24 months agoPost 6
Dr.Ben

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Richmond, VA, USA

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No I do not have hard data about freezing the way we know about keeping packs at refrigerated temps. I could imagine some concern for whether the internal construction of cells is completely devoid of moisture because they are after all sandwiches wrapped in soft metal. How this might play with a subzero, thaw, then repeat cycle might prove detrimental. All you can do is try it for a winter and then assess the consequences to known, measured capacity next spring.

Ben Minor

Peak Aircraft/Team Minicopter Team Futaba Team Kontronik USA

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11-08-2016 03:42 PM  24 months agoPost 7
getsuyoubi

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Queens, NY - USA

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Besides the condensation issue I wouldn't really expect any problem. "Freezing temperature" just refers to water, and since LiPos don't contain any water 32F (or 0 degrees C) is very likely not a temperature where anything changes for LiPos. Lowering the temperature generally slows down chemical processes, which for LiPos is a good thing, I think, unless you use them while "frozen".

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11-08-2016 04:07 PM  24 months agoPost 8
Ace Dude

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USA

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I know of two leading vendors who recommend preventing the electrolyte from freezing. They didn't specify the temperature at which the electrolyte freezes or what happens if it does freeze, but that's good enough for me.

  

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11-08-2016 04:47 PM  24 months agoPost 9
Tyler

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Chicagoland area

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What happens to all those electric cars sold and driven in freezing climates, like New York? They have lithium batteries.

Are lipo batteries transported in climate controlled trucks during winter months?

I own a golf cart that has lithium batteries and it has performed well for three years, and it is stored in a shed during cold Chicago winters.

Enjoy things that money can buy IF you don't lose the things money can't buy.

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11-08-2016 07:29 PM  24 months agoPost 10
heliraptor10

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kokomo, in-US

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If for no other reason,
Sub freezing temperatures should be avoided with anything electrical because most electronics contain some amount of tin.

Tin pest is a sort of crystallization phenomenon that breaks down tin and alloys containing tin at sub freezing temperatures.

Goblin! where have you been all my life?
RC helis, the original fidget spinners

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11-09-2016 12:47 AM  24 months agoPost 11
wrongler

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Brewerton, New York

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Keep the post's coming, I think we are raising some good points.

Bill Whittaker

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11-09-2016 12:38 PM  24 months agoPost 12
getsuyoubi

rrApprentice

Queens, NY - USA

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I'm not arguing that something bad may happen at low temperatures, but 32F is just an arbitrary temperature where water happens to freeze - in other words, it's the melting point of water ice. Other materials have different melting points, and it's at or around these melting points where things get interesting.

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11-09-2016 07:45 PM  24 months agoPost 13
Four Stroker

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Atlanta

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Long term storage spec for a typical LiPo:

Best 20±5°C for long-time storage

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11-09-2016 09:30 PM  24 months agoPost 14
wrongler

rrProfessor

Brewerton, New York

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Is 3 months long time storage?

Bill Whittaker

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11-10-2016 12:54 PM  24 months agoPost 15
getsuyoubi

rrApprentice

Queens, NY - USA

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Where did you find that? I'm surprised; I actually expected that lower temperatures are better because it slows down chemical processes. Do you know the reasoning behind that 20 degree recommendation?

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11-10-2016 02:28 PM  24 months agoPost 16
Richardmid1

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Leeds, England

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It's not about keeping them cold but about not letting them overheat. Don't keep them in your car on a hot day for example. Room temp is fine. Save room in your fridge for more beer!

60% of the time, it works every time!

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11-10-2016 03:20 PM  24 months agoPost 17
Heli 770

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USA.

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11-10-2016 03:43 PM  24 months agoPost 18
Richardmid1

rrProfessor

Leeds, England

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4% loss after 1 year at 25c and that's higher than room temp so yeah I'll take that.

60% of the time, it works every time!

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11-10-2016 07:49 PM  24 months agoPost 19
wrongler

rrProfessor

Brewerton, New York

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Still looking for someone that has left them in a shed or garage over the winter to respond.

Bill Whittaker

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11-12-2016 03:40 PM  24 months agoPost 20
icanfly

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ontario

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hey, I know someone who left a lipo in his car trunk over a winter and summer, one straight year. Gave it to me and I flew it no problem except the lipo was just not up to my c rating demands so it's been parked.

I always freeze a puffed lipo and actually flew a 1300mah lipo until it was severely puffed, put it in the freezer for an hour and it became nearly skin tight again, again was not a recommended c rating for the heli. Last winter I actually forgot one Pulse lipo (of two) out in a snow pile overnight and continued to use it later.

Recently an over discharged, slightly puffed, and imbalanced Pulse 1300mah lipo would not allow a high c discharge and would sound off the lipo alarm upon flying, even after I froze it to bring the puff down a bit. Left it at storage charge for a couple of months and decided to give another try a few days ago. Wonderful as it functioned normally again.

Freezing only will slow down the rate of discharge. Example, I let a 2s lipo for a coax become ambient outdoor temp of 20f. It didn't last long flight time wise and did not degrade the next time it was used. I fly in severe weather when I can and flew in -5f winter of 2015 (or was that 2013?) only after taking the lipo outdoors from initializing indoors so it was still warm when in use.

Packs are sealed, I would not worry, in fact I encourage everyone to test the temp limits of their lipos, it'll give confidence in ones equipment to know how far limits can be pushed without someone telling you.

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