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HomeAircraftHelicopterMain Discussion › Damaged capacitors on ESC?
06-18-2015 03:39 AM  3 years agoPost 21
dkshema

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Cedar Rapids, IA

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69 cents each at http://www.newark.com for the 25V, 330 uf part (this one is 10 mm dia x 12.5 mm long), and about 1200 in stock:

http://www.newark.com/rubycon/25zlg...Id=800000005278

-----

For the 25V/470 uF part, 68 cents a pop, 381 in stock:

http://www.newark.com/united-chemi-...itor/dp/23K4089

It would help a bit if you could measure the diameter and body length in millimeters...

Both are relatively low ESR -- Effective Series Resistance -- parts.

Newark is another excellent supplier of electronic parts.

-----

The TXXXX numbers look like date/lot codes. PET means it has a Polyethylene jacket.

Key items are capacitance (330 and 470 microfarads, and 25VDC working voltage). Search for those aluminum electrolytic capacitors, having low ESR -- somewhere less than perhaps about 50 milliohms. ZLG is the RubyCon manufacturer product code for a low ESR cap. Diameter and body length will help you sort out what you need.

In addition to Newark, you should be able to find a suitable replacement at http://www.mouser.com, http://www.digikey.com.

-----
Dave

* Making the World Better -- One Helicopter at a time! *

Team Heliproz

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06-18-2015 04:42 AM  3 years agoPost 22
EEngineer

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TX

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Which YGE 120 are you using?

If it's the 120 HV, you'll need 50V alum. electro caps, rather than 25V.

Sounds like you have the 120 LV(6S max) since the cap markings are of a 25V cap.

As was mentioned, get the "low ESR" variety...it'll be specified in DigiKey's "downloadable" PDF "data sheet".

And, if you were to choose a 50V caps, they'll work just fine on the 120LV.

Another thing to consider, you should use a "grounded tip" soldering iron to replace these caps....otherwise, you risk damaging the ESC.

Most "soldering stations" are "grounded tippers"....but if your iron has a 2-pronged AC plug....it's not a "grounded tip" iron and should not be used.

A "non grounded tip" iron has 120VAC present on the iron tip....

This exceeds the max. voltage spec of the caps you intend to replace....in addition to the max. voltages to the circuits that the caps are attached to.

FWIW

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06-18-2015 02:15 PM  3 years agoPost 23
Fauropitotto

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Tampa, FL

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but if your iron has a 2-pronged AC plug....it's not a "grounded tip" iron and should not be used.

A "non grounded tip" iron has 120VAC present on the iron tip....

This exceeds the max. voltage spec of the caps you intend to replace....in addition to the max. voltages to the circuits that the caps are attached to.
Damn. Well that would explain why so many of my small projects were absolute failures over the years.

CTZN#564 | MSH MaxV2 770, SAB Goblin 700C, FPV Quad racers

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06-22-2015 12:25 AM  3 years agoPost 24
ZS-JAF

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Nazareth, PA

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I did not know about the 120AC tip iron. That is what I have so that would be a no go. I tested the ESC on the bench full power with an increased pitch prop for 1 min bursts. I then put it in the plane and flew it 5 flights 90F outside and the hottest I got the ESC was 135F. No issues so far. I will report back if there is a failure. Thank you for the info for next time or possibly the YGE.

I have a 3D heli, I don't understand why it doesn't do 3D

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06-22-2015 01:26 AM  3 years agoPost 25
RM3

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Killeen, Texas - USA

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A "non grounded tip" iron has 120VAC present on the iron tip
um no it does not... the heating element is uncased in a mica shell on alot of the non grounded irons, as a kid I used to take those cheap non grounded radio shack irons apart and thats how they were constructed neither the neutral nor hot leg were connected to any part of the metal shell ... so all non grounded irons basically have an "open" shell tip electrically speaking

think about it, if the iron had 120vac present on the tip it would be a violation of UL and CE compliance and not be safe to use on anything as it would present a shock hazard and not be safe for consumer use.

showing a preference will only get you into trouble, 90% of everything is crap...

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06-22-2015 01:48 AM  3 years agoPost 26
EEngineer

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TX

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um no it does not
I beg to differ...I can show you using my O-scope....

A nice big 120 VAC 60 Hz sine wave.

But, even though the voltage is present, hardly any current flows and you don't get a shock when you touch the heated tip(just a burn...lol)...which is what you're describing.

Some components can be damaged by such voltage. The could fail at the time of soldering...or be damaged so that they will fail later.

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06-22-2015 02:06 AM  3 years agoPost 27
RM3

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Killeen, Texas - USA

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i can stand under a florescent lamp... and touch the tip of my probe with my finger on my oscilloscope and also get a 60hz sine wave... does that mean Im being electrocuted?

like I said, it if its got "actual" line current flowing on the shell thats connected to the tip, where you are likely to touch it (like when holding the solder with the other hand), you would get a shock so then it does not have UL/CE compliance and therefore unsafe to use.

showing a preference will only get you into trouble, 90% of everything is crap...

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06-22-2015 02:09 AM  3 years agoPost 28
EEngineer

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TX

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does that mean Im being electrocuted?
No, it's means that your O-scope probe is acting as an antenna.

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06-22-2015 02:10 AM  3 years agoPost 29
EEngineer

rrProfessor

TX

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shock
The ungrounded tip iron will not shock you...but will apply a 120 VAC 60 Hz sine wave to anything being soldered.

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06-22-2015 04:05 AM  3 years agoPost 30
EEngineer

rrProfessor

TX

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you would get a shock so then it does not have UL/CE compliance and therefore unsafe to use.
You are entirely correct, RM3.

By the "ungrounded tip" soldering iron design and construction, as you mentioned, this type of iron is safe to use...free from electrical shock hazard.

But, there is the presence of a 120 VAC, 60 Hz sine wave on the iron tip....referenced from a 3-prong electrical receptacle's ground.

With regards to the OP's electrolytic capacitor issue, many people have suggested that they can be easily replaced DYI....but those caps. are polarized and have a specified "max" voltage rating.

While most of us have invested in a "soldering station"...which always have "grounded" iron tips....some still use a "non-grounded" tip iron(2 prong AC plug) to do electronic mods.

With a resistor of any type, doesn't matter what type of iron is used for soldering.

With a electrolytic cap. rated at 25V, it does matter...as the cap's "electrolytes" can be damaged in the process of soldering.

Likewise, it's not good practice to solder bullet connectors to one's ESC for similar reasons, using a "non-grounded" tip soldering iron.

FWIW

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06-22-2015 04:15 AM  3 years agoPost 31
EEngineer

rrProfessor

TX

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I'd like to see, for example, a CC survey of their ESCs sent back for repair.

With a question, what type of iron did you use to solder the bullets....2-prong...or a "station"?

Graph the results.

I think the ESC manufacturers should have "bullet connector" options to fit a customers needs, in these cases.

From a EE...proper soldering is a PITA...if the act of soldering is pain....one has to have the proper soldering iron...

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06-22-2015 06:11 AM  3 years agoPost 32
wc_wickedclown (RIP)

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long beach calif

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..one has to have the proper soldering iron...
+1
i use a 90 watt iron ,ive seen guys use a 30watt iron ive used a 30 watt iron

with a 30 watt iron you end up with nuggets and the nuggets don't hold good

my 90 watt melts the solder fast makes the solder melt and look like liquid chrome, penetrates the wire and the bullet connectors

then i bend an pull on the solder job i try to break it if she does not break im on my way.

pen torches look like they were the best have not had a chance to try one yet,

Insha Allah made in america

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06-22-2015 08:21 AM  3 years agoPost 33
EEngineer

rrProfessor

TX

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WC, one has to have the proper heat...that's a given.

If one ventures into electronics without the proper tools...

such is suspect....and their results have are not been properly documented.

So who cares...

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06-22-2015 03:16 PM  3 years agoPost 34
wc_wickedclown (RIP)

rrProfessor

long beach calif

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EEngineer
WC, one has to have the proper heat...that's a given.
If one ventures into electronics without the proper tools...
such is suspect....and their results have are not been properly documented.
So who cares...
30 watt iron is good for circuit boards huh ?

Insha Allah made in america

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06-23-2015 01:10 AM  3 years agoPost 35
tadawson

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Lewisville, TX

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For a lot of fine board work 30 would be like picking your teeth with a baseball bat . . . for small work, I use a 15 with a very fine point.

- Tim

Friends don't let friends become electrotarded . . . .

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06-23-2015 07:02 AM  3 years agoPost 36
EEngineer

rrProfessor

TX

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huh
Why don't ya'll try a small iron tip....grounded...and while you're at it....get some "readers"....it's hard to see small parts...

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06-23-2015 07:06 AM  3 years agoPost 37
EEngineer

rrProfessor

TX

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for small work
I can vary my iron's tip temp.....for small work, one uses a small iron tip...

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06-23-2015 12:42 PM  3 years agoPost 38
jharkin

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Holliston, MA - USA

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The grounded vs. ungrounded soldering iron thing... I think EE and RM3 are just arguing semantics.

For others wondering - in the ungrounded iron the heating element is not directly connected to the tip exposing full line voltage and current on it - as RM3 rightly pointed out that would shock you, and blow a circuit breaker the first time it touched anything connect to the house ground.

But EE is not wrong either. In the iron the heating coil is encased in ceramic within the metal shell of the tip. The ceramic is not thick enough to form a perfect insulation, so there can be a very tiny leakage of current to the tip typically. This would be enough to show up on a scope, but not enough to shock you, and Im guessing not even enough to register on a meter except on the very lowest range.

The leakage current has to be *extremely* small however, or else a 3 prong grounded iron would trip a GFCI outlet. I use a grounded iron in my basement shop on GFCI outlets all the time and its never tripped one.

-Jeremy
Whiplash-G
Helix 700G
T-Rex 450 fbl conversion
alot of planks

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06-23-2015 09:46 PM  3 years agoPost 39
tadawson

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Lewisville, TX

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I can vary my iron's tip temp.....for small work, one uses a small iron tip...
I had a nice digital, temp controlled station from Weller for years . . . and the iron finally died, and whaddaya know, Weller can't be bothered to support it any more, and $450 for another is more than I want to spend right now, so I have a 15, a 25 (or 30?), a 110 watt gun, and an Asian SMD rework station at this point. (My regulated I think was just a 15 as well - for most of what I do, I either don't need more, or I need a *LOT* more . . . )

- Tim

Friends don't let friends become electrotarded . . . .

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08-19-2015 03:20 PM  3 years agoPost 40
ZS-JAF

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Nazareth, PA

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The update for the damaged ESC is. 50 flights with temps 90-105 degrees in a glider works like a champ. I guess I just got lucky here and the damage is mostly cosmetic. I am sure the life span of the unit has been reduced but I will use it till it does.

I have a 3D heli, I don't understand why it doesn't do 3D

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HomeAircraftHelicopterMain Discussion › Damaged capacitors on ESC?
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