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HomeAircraftHelicopterBeginners Corner › From Quadcopters To Helicopters
05-28-2015 05:39 PM  3 years agoPost 1
EddyP

rrNovice

Sussex

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Hi Everyone,

I have been reading this forum for a while now trying to learn a bit more about helicopters as I want to attempt to start flying helicopters as well as my passion for flying quadcopters but I don't really know where to begin.

As a bit of a background information I currently own 2 quadcopters the first of which was a RED5 Quadcopter and my second was a Hubsan X4 so I haven't really delved into self build flying RC vehicles as of yet. This seems to be what most of the seasoned pros in here all have done which is why I would love your advice.

What do you think would be the best avenue to go down when learning to fly an RC helicopter? Should I stick with the ready made models or is it better to build and easier to fly if I build the RC helicopter from scratch?

Any advice would be extremely appreciated.

Thanks

Ed

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05-28-2015 10:56 PM  3 years agoPost 2
wrongler

rrProfessor

Brewerton, New York

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If you build it yourself and crash it, You will know how to repair it!
I would practice on a sim first!

Bill Whittaker

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05-28-2015 11:18 PM  3 years agoPost 3
flyboy1985

rrApprentice

mohnton pa

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first things , sim , sim , sim , without a sim , you will crash , and end up quiting becaus you just cant get it ,
another thing is rtf models are more like ( all put together for you) and thats about it, you still should recheck the model in setup to make sure everything is right,, which brings me to a kit rather than a rtf ,,
a kit will let you know you heli inside and out , so when you crash , you can fix the broken part more easy ,
the downside to a kit , is , if you dont know what your doing for setup and all , your gonna crash before the heli even lifts off!!
so someone local who can show you the ropes in setup and radio setup would be most helpful ,, and to make sure the model is built and setup correctly.
search the fourm , im sure this topic is asked alot,,, best of luck to ya

going pro , one crash at a time

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05-29-2015 12:33 PM  3 years agoPost 4
EddyP

rrNovice

Sussex

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That is a very good point Wrongler and knowing my luck I would probably crash it within 5 minutes so knowing how to repair it would come in extremely handy!

Thanks for the advice Flyboy I will have a look at different heli sims over the weekend when I have a bit more time on my hands. Have you used any sims before that you could recommend or are they all pretty similar?

I have tried looking for RC flying clubs around my area previously for people to fly my quadcopters with unfortunately there doesn't appear to be any nearby at this moment in time which is a shame. I might have to start one up myself!

Thanks both of you for the advice, I will search the forums for the best pieces of kit that I can use and hopefully if all goes well I will be flying a heli in no time at all.

Thanks

Ed

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05-29-2015 01:01 PM  3 years agoPost 5
grim.the.grim

rrVeteran

Houston, Texas

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+100 for the use of a Sim and a entry level RTF Heli. The small helis are squirrelly and if you can fly those you can fly anything. Besides the sim, find a local club. There are always members willing to help. Having a Heli pilot help you out, teach you,guide you,and buddy box you is what you need. Having someone buddy box you gets rid of the fear of crashing your new Heli

*** Real Pilots BEAT the air into submission! ***

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05-29-2015 09:51 PM  3 years agoPost 6
Ladymagic

rrKey Veteran

South Korea

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Long story short, buy the sim for sure and while RTFs save you time up front, taking the time to learn about all the parts and functions of your heli will ultimately enhance your learning curve.

I would say build one from a kit. There so many resources and helis nowadays are so well manufactured, that you shouldn't have many problems if you decided to build one.

Good luck.

Mellisa

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06-06-2015 08:35 PM  3 years agoPost 7
Noobyflyer

rrVeteran

Clearwater, FL

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Building a kit is far more rewarding then buying an RTF. Learning how stuff works is huge. And so is working with others that can help you along the way.

Accepting the fact that you're going to crash is important too. When you do, you will know how to fix it. I think a lot of people quit when they buy an RTF and crash it. They have no clue how to put it back together and are out of the hobby because of it.

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06-16-2015 08:29 PM  3 years agoPost 8
Gyronut

rrProfessor

Martinsville In.

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Even if you buy a RTF, tear the thing down and use lock tight sparingly everywhere.

Welcome to the madness.

Rick

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06-16-2015 09:38 PM  3 years agoPost 9
Aaron29

rrProfessor

USA

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SIM SIM SIM.

Quad copters are stable. Helis aren't. Even the most stable pod/boom heli will tend to drift places. Absent or improper stick movements can create a critical situation fast.

You'll need to be on the sticks to learn it. It's a steep learning curve best tacked on the simulator. Once you can hover proficiently in one spot and move the helicopter into a desired position and keep it there on the simulator, you're ready to try the real deal.

I didn't even BUY a heli until I could hover the sim. Removed all temptation to rush into the air.

They are far harder than they look. And for folks coming from quad backgrounds, they will be surprised at how even with 3 axis stabilization, helis move around on their own. Correct and timely stick inputs are critical. Then there's overcontrolling to worry about.

SIM!

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06-17-2015 12:24 AM  3 years agoPost 10
GyroFreak

rrProfessor

Orlando Florida ...28N 81W

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When you do eventually try to fly for real, make sure your machine is setup with very little negative pitch. Other wise during a low level hover panic you will tend to yank the collective full down which results in extreme damage. I learned this the hard way.

I think about the hereafter. I go somewhere to get something, then wonder what I'm here after ?

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06-17-2015 12:46 AM  3 years agoPost 11
Retired2011

rrElite Veteran

Lee's Summit, MO

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When you do eventually try to fly for real, make sure your machine is setup with very little negative pitch. Other wise during a low level hover panic you will tend to yank the collective full down which results in extreme damage. I learned this the hard way.
+1
That's the reason I moved up from fixed pitch to CP helis shortly after beginning - I saw the writing on the wall - I was developing a bad habit.

Chet

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06-17-2015 02:21 AM  3 years agoPost 12
rexxigpilot

rrProfessor

Florida

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When you do eventually try to fly for real, make sure your machine is setup with very little negative pitch. Other wise during a low level hover panic you will tend to yank the collective full down which results in extreme damage. I learned this the hard way.
This is typically only a problem for those of us who started with RC planes. The "chop the throttle" mentality. Folks who started on multirotors don't do this. IMO it is best for these folks to start off with even collective pitch since they are already used to this on their multirotors. Just don't use 14±° like many of us do. Perhaps it would be best to use a mild 7± to 8± degrees of pitch or simply just use a good bit of expo to make it soft around middle.

Regarding the question of RTF or kit heli, I suggest going with the kit. First, as others have mentioned a kit will get you acquainted with the heli's parts and functioning. Secondly, you can buy a better quality kit for about the same price as a RTF. Best advice is to join a local club if possible and shadow the other heli guys. And, get a simulator.

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