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HomeAircraftHelicopterHelicopter Main Discussion › Why is crashing such a "badge of honor" for some people
01-21-2015 06:15 PM  3 years agoPost 41
MattJen

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UK

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deleted

All The Best

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01-21-2015 07:16 PM  3 years agoPost 42
Rob43

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Midland, MI USA

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Badge of Honor? Where in the hell did you get that?

Rob

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01-21-2015 07:50 PM  3 years agoPost 43
HeimD

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the great southwest

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Made me wanna cry. Had two perfect days of flying I had to sit by and watch.
That's why you should already have another heli (or five) as back-ups. Heck, I got two 180CFXs just so I could have a back-up in my micro hangar section.

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01-21-2015 07:55 PM  3 years agoPost 44
HeimD

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the great southwest

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And, yes, a good crash certainly CAN become a "badge of honor". It depends on the group of guys you fly with. If it was a spectacular crash that still gets talked about long after, it becomes "legendary". I have a crash like that and when people bring it up, it kinda makes me proud and I just laugh along with them about how awesome it was since they're a great group of friends/flying buddies. Do I consider it a "badge of honor"? Sure, why not. Ain't hurtin' nothing. It's like the enormously fat chick you porked in college and then everyone found out it about later. Still hear about that every once in a while, too.

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01-21-2015 08:20 PM  3 years agoPost 45
MattJen

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Ain't hurtin' nothing. It's like the enormously fat chick you porked in college and everyone found out about later. Still hear about that every once in a while, too.

Now that's a funny comment, made me choke on my coffee LOL

All The Best

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01-21-2015 09:23 PM  3 years agoPost 46
Steve Graham

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Denver, CO

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Andrew Merlino flew into a huge stand of wild berries at Snohomish last fall. He was going so fast that the heli drove through the bushes and ended up coming out of the top a split second later, mortally wounded but with the head still spinning. We knew it was spinning because a large portion of the bush was attached and going around and around with it.

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01-21-2015 11:37 PM  3 years agoPost 47
gologo

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Sedalia, Mo USA

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We knew it was spinning because a large portion of the bush was attached and going around and around with it.
Now THAT is funny!

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01-22-2015 12:06 AM  3 years agoPost 48
turboomni

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East of the Equator

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I know a guy that used to compete in the late 1980'sand 90's. He said in the old days if you crashed the audience would yell out awwww in disappointment for the crash and today the audience seems to want you to crash and applaud and yell loudly in approval if you do so!!!

Setup is everything, All my heli's can fly far better than I can pilot them

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01-22-2015 12:41 AM  3 years agoPost 49
JasonJ

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North Idaho

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Additionally, you should hit TH before impact on EVERY crash. It has the added benefit of reducing crash damage. It's a great habit to learn and the sim is the ONLY teacher (Can't go practice crashes IRL.)
I sort of almost agree with this but not.

I agree that if there is the possibility of it hurting someone or yourself hit throttle hold and sacrifice the model.

I don't agree with hitting throttle hold before every crash and here is why: If you have the presence of mind to flip the switch, you have the presence of mind to input corrective control and fly out of it. I cannot count how many times I have saved a helicopter within a few feet of the ground. Had I hit throttle hold when people say to, I would have crashed several times in a season verses no crashes in three years now.

Sometimes its just going in and there isn't anything that can be done, like a mechanical failure. Barring that, I would rather attempt to save it all the way to the ground. I'll hit throttle hold if it crashes, I have to repair the thing anyway, what's a few more parts. If I don't give up by hitting throttle hold and I save the helicopter I have done two things: Prevented a crash and learned a little more about how to not crash. In my mind, hitting throttle hold is hitting the reset button, you are teaching yourself how to crash, not how to fly. You are guaranteeing yourself a repair bill and down time. If you can fly out of it SAFELY,I feel that is the better route.

Bear in mind I don't fly close to myself or others and that makes a difference. Someone who flies like Tareq probably should just hit throttle hold every time because the helicopter is always close to someone.

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01-22-2015 01:54 AM  3 years agoPost 50
Aaron29

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USA

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A balance must be achieved.

So long as no persons/property are at risk, I'll not fault you for saving a model. But at some point, dumping your model is the right thing to do, and shows better judgment.

Saw a good sized rc airplane takeoff with a bad aileron, and head 200 yards into the no-fly zone at our field. The whole time I'm thinking, "Dude. Idle!" It ended up crashing 10 feet from an undivided highway where traffic is routinely going 65-70 mph. There was nothing else wrong with the model but ailerons. It was completely senseless and put uninvolved motorists at great risk in trying to save a $1000 model.

I've also seen saves go thru the occupied pilot's station. Not cool.

I saw a guy intentionally dump an F-16 Turbine when it was having trouble spooling up to go around after a bad approach and was pointed at the pits. He might have made it had he tried to fly it out. But it was the best judgment I ever saw. The guy crashed a $10,000 jet for us. I bet few people have that awareness of priorities.

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01-22-2015 03:15 AM  3 years agoPost 51
EEngineer

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TX

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But at some point, dumping your model is the right thing to do, and shows better judgment.
Every time I spool-up, I run thru my mind about my "when to dump it" drill, for the sake of any spectators.

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01-22-2015 03:19 AM  3 years agoPost 52
EEngineer

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TX

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Saw a good sized rc airplane takeoff with a bad aileron, and head 200 yards into the no-fly zone at our field.
Did you see the YouTube of Mac Hodges giant scale B-29 crash on takeoff at some big fly-in?

The outer port engine could was only "idling" on the takeoff roll-out....and the B-29 headed for the pits...no right rudder added..and was "horsed" off the ground and stalled...

Fortunately, no one hurt.

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01-22-2015 03:24 AM  3 years agoPost 53
Aaron29

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USA

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Yeah. It was clear early in the takeoff roll he needed to abort.
And still his fanbase doesn't see the harm in that.

There's another video out there with a guy who just barely ducks out of the way of an F-15 Turbine taking off with bad directional control. Almost took the guy's head off.

It was another clear case of stop trying to fly the model! And yet on that one, you still had people arguing he did the best thing cuz it turned out OK. Jeez. Use your head, folks. I'd rather be hit by an idling jet rolling 15 mph after an abort than take on on the chin at 50 mph. The justification for continued flight just sometimes IS NOT there.

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01-22-2015 03:32 AM  3 years agoPost 54
Aaron29

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USA

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no crashes in three years now.
I applaud your record. But now that you've gone and said this, the heli gods will need a sacrifice. LOL

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01-22-2015 03:41 AM  3 years agoPost 55
Aaron29

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USA

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Found it....

Watch at YouTube

"Sorry" is RIGHT!

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01-22-2015 03:42 AM  3 years agoPost 56
EEngineer

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TX

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And still his fanbase doesn't see the harm in that.
HK was his fanbase....he looked very "sheepish" when explaining away that "faux pas"....

I've seen many plank pilots fly....and the time they use rudder, is to steer on the ground....

So many things can go wrong...each not that major....but when added up in one instance...disaster occurs.

And that guy had been flying that B-29 successfully for years at fly-ins...

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01-22-2015 03:44 AM  3 years agoPost 57
Aaron29

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USA

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Even if he jammed in rudder, it still would have been unsafe. An abort was still the prudent action.

We've a mantra in the airplane world. Takeoffs are optional. Landings are mandatory.

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01-23-2015 12:35 AM  3 years agoPost 58
EEngineer

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TX

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An abort was still the prudent action.
Absolutely, but had he held some right on the roll-out, it wouldn't have veered as it did.

Know he had rudder, because he turned during taxi'ing.

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01-23-2015 03:19 AM  3 years agoPost 59
icanfly

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ontario

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I didn't know crashing was a badge of honor, it's more like a pain in the arse.

I remember my first 450 cp experience with fb clone se, all of 20 seconds maybe less and crash, I picked it up and said omg not even a minute in the air. I knew I'd crash and when I'd venture from a comfort zone. Crashing was part of the learning curve, if you want to fly this difficult thing you have to get over it and make improvements, in the machine and the control of it. didn't have a sim till a year later, it helped with some saves quite honestly, where I'd lapse and wait a few seconds to do what I should do rather than what I used to, crash because I did not know what to do.

My crashes have provided me with many wonderful amusing hours of entertainment and wonder, many of them becoming ops for improvement to both heli and my flying skills, s-kill-s, shyt killing stupids.

badges? what badges? we no need no stinkin crashes, I mean badges.

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01-23-2015 04:47 AM  3 years agoPost 60
EEngineer

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TX

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Badge of Honor? Where in the hell did you get that?
From comments posted that if you haven't crashed "a lot", then you're not flying enough.....paraphrased.

And not just on RR.

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