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HomeAircraftHelicopterMain Discussion › Where to go next? Help with practice schedule
06-16-2014 01:43 PM  4 years agoPost 1
HeliNutAndy

rrKey Veteran

worcester, MA USA

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This is my second year or summer flying model helis. I try to fly in the winter but there are two months that it's just too cold to have fun with it. I don't have any flying buddies so the only experience I get is my own or from the internet. I was hoping for a little help on what to practice next. I can fly circuits upright with no issues and can also fly upside with no problems. My inverted flight is not as good or natural as my upright skills but that is like anything else. I have spent more time upright. I also can flip the model with no issues and rainbows are my favorite move. I have performed thousands of rainbows but still cannot get a clean tic toc for the life of me. It seems when the heli stops at each angle it shakes. I'm not sure if I need more cyclic gain or if it's my thumbs shaking I try to use the sim but I can never translate what I do on the sim to the field so it's more of a game for me than a learning tool. I was thinking of attempting to learn piro loops(Smacktalk Video) next. Is there a natural progression or practice routine that most people follow. The hobby is starting to lose some of it's shine for me since all I do is rainbows and practice simple inverted circuits. Maybe it's time for a Harley

Thx for the help,
Andy

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06-16-2014 02:37 PM  4 years agoPost 2
kamaroman540

rrApprentice

Maple Shade N.J

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Autos
Can u do autos,they r fun and try to find out why the heli shakes when it does tick tocs ,try tighten the main blades more ,can u flip in all directions ,nose in ,from the left and right and inverted?I try new stuff all the time with the heli,theres nothing it can do,its up to you.Rain bows r great ,try doing a flip in the middle then finish the rainbow,Iam doing that now and its not that hard once u get the timing down,and it looks neat.Good Luck Andy and just have fun,I know what u mean ,it does get stale after a little while when u fly by your self.

Hope this helps u out
Erik

LOGO600SX LOGO400SE

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06-16-2014 03:21 PM  4 years agoPost 3
jackp332

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Claremont, Nh USA

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Always fying alone sucks- period. I like to practice new maneuvers alone just so I don't have lots of eyes on me and im not so nervous. But, if I was always alone and didn't have our small group of guys down at the field to keep things interesting id probably be on my Harley alot more too lol.

**Awesome group of heli guys in Surry, NH just 30min North of MA line near Keene NH.

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06-16-2014 03:25 PM  4 years agoPost 4
BrainDrain_dx

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Wichita KS

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Brains guide to mad 3dz

Hover all 4 orientations upright
figure 8 forwards and backwards upright

flips (so you can learn inverted)
rolls
Autos(Baby autos)

Hover all 4 orientations inverted
figure 8 forwards and backwards inverted

piro hover upright
piro circles upright (hurricane)
piro figure 8 upright

piro hover inverted
piro circles inverted
piro figure 8 inverted

then you get to start 3d and it will be a snap to learn.

half piro flips
tic tocs
full piro flips
4 point tic tocs
Pogos
piro tic tocs

sky is the limit

All stationary maneuvers are learned "completely" when they can be done in a controlled box. From hover to piro flips this works very well. its not enough to be able to do a flip, you must continually flip while moving up, down, left, right, forward and backward on demand. At this point you will be able to do the move in any wind direction and its time to move on to the next.

KDS Agile 7.2/5.5 Chase 360 - SkyHero Spyder/Spy/Little Spyder
Sponsored by my Visa

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06-16-2014 03:43 PM  4 years agoPost 5
Richardmid1

rrProfessor

Leeds, England

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Once you have all upright hovering orientations and can fly fast and slow forward circuits its time for backwards circuits fast and slow. Then you need all inverted hovering orientations, inverted forward circuits, inverted backwards circuits, loops forward, backwards, inverted forwards and inverted backwards, rolls forwards and backwards, stationary piroettes fast and slow left and right, inverted stationary piroettes fast and slow left and right, flips forwards backwards side on tail in and nose in, tic tocs (try use more cyclic and less collective and don't try do them fast like the pros!) (heli wobbling could be down to it loosing head speed so go easy on the sticks!) tail down side on, aileron tic tocs tail left nose right, piro flips left and right rudder, (these open up a world of piro manuevers like piro flipping loop etc.), piro circuits, piro hurricanes, piro loops, piro ball/globe etc. etc. etc. at that point you are at a high competition level but there are still countless combinations of manuevers.

Above all THE most important thing is just to enjoy it and fly fly and fly some more! Buy spares, fuel/batteries instead of bling! Watch videos of the pros flying and pick a manuever that you think looks cool and watch it over and over again and break it down so you can think about what control inputs are needed, practice on the sim then go out and try it for real high up! Enjoy!

Oops, forgot auto's, they should be the first thing you learn after you can hover!

60% of the time, it works every time!

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06-16-2014 03:48 PM  4 years agoPost 6
unclejane

rrElite Veteran

santa fe, NM, USA

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I'm still trying to learn to takeoff and land without a crash. After a little over 20 years I can sort of fly around. Sometimes I go home with a helicopter too but not always. So I never understand these threads...

LS

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06-16-2014 06:17 PM  4 years agoPost 7
HeliNutAndy

rrKey Veteran

worcester, MA USA

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Thx for the help and info. I've always had a bad habit of trying to get as good as possible even if I'm not having fun doing so. I guess it will never end

Thx again,
Andy

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06-16-2014 09:46 PM  4 years agoPost 8
airdodger

rrElite Veteran

Johnston USA

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Plenty of clubs in Mass close to you, maybe go to a few and see if you like any. Your skills will grow faster with other people around to keep your interest and help showing you new moves.

Chris

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06-16-2014 10:54 PM  4 years agoPost 9
Josh Kussman

rrApprentice

Superior, NE

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I can under stand about flying alone and that's what makes going to funflys and flying with friend once in a while so fun. I to hit a time were I wanted to give up, so I didn't fly for a month one time I think it helped me but i started flying 50 size planes which I also think helped.

Never had a routine. Just wanted to learn tricks then move on to another. Always had a goal to work for keeps me going still. Like they said get the basics down. Just try to keep from getting stuck in a rut.

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06-17-2014 12:49 AM  4 years agoPost 10
Ladymagic

rrKey Veteran

South Korea

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I spent close to 3 years learning to fly alone and I even did a lot of it in the dead of winter when I was stationed in ND. Talk about cold lol.

Right now, it sounds like you are on the right path. Things do get stale if you don't keep pushing your self. But looking back, I am glad I learned the way I did. For most of 3 years, I spend just learning to hover...since I didn't know about the sim. I knew I was ready to start FF, but was too scared to actually try it. But, what it did for me, was allow me to not just learn the basics, but to perfect them to the point that it became second nature. And when I did finally get a sim, I learned FF and 3d in less than a month. All that time I spend just hovering really shows in my flying style because I fly more deliberate and precise rather than just reacting to the hell and hope my inputs are correct. I also never crashed a heli because it got into a position I was not comfortable with.

My advice for you is to do what you are doing. It's obviously working for you. All I can say to stave off the boredom of repetition and loneliness is to simply keep challenging yourself. Shoot for perfection, precision hovers in every possible orientation. And once you've got your upright down to a science flip it over and start again. Break it up with short FF spot-to-spots. Work on your transitions. Naturally, you'll be able to perform FF longer and longer until you don't need to do spot-to-spot.

Start low and slow and stay away from any 3d until you can precision hover, auto, and FF in any orientation first. Believe it or not, you can tell who spent a lot of time on the basics and who learned just enough to get into "stick banging." Those who did just enough tend to crash religiously and their 3d tends to look random, uncontrolled and rather sloppy. Many also seem to prefer overpowered setups to compensate for their lack of skill in collective management. Don't be that guy.

Good luck and safe flying

Mellisa

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06-17-2014 01:04 AM  4 years agoPost 11
Daved Gutierrez

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Chicago, IL

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definitely learn all you hovering orientation, right side up and inverted and then work on your pirouetting hovering both directions(left and right) right side up and inverted, i would recommend you spend half of your flight practicing one thing and the other half doing something else. All 3D moves involve all of this hovering angles so if you master them you will learn how to 3D sooner, crash a lot less and be a much safer pilot.

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06-17-2014 01:06 AM  4 years agoPost 12
Daved Gutierrez

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Chicago, IL

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great post Ladymagic.

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06-17-2014 01:47 PM  4 years agoPost 13
HeliNutAndy

rrKey Veteran

worcester, MA USA

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I actually became a member of a club a few weeks ago. I went to visit the field for the first time and there were about 20 people flying and waiting in line. I was dying to get some flying in so I turned my butt around and went to my usual place to fly. Among the 20 or so people there were no helis . I plan on going back next weekend because there is a local fun fly this weekend I may check out.

I love your post Lady. I always wondered when I watch some pilots perform 3D if they are actually controlling the heli or if they were just letting it fly and directing it on occasion. For me I need to have total control. I don't know if that's right or wrong or if it's the slow way to get better. The only times I have crashed are due to setup issues or mechanical failure.

Another thing that I think may help is another model I have a 770, 500, a Trex 700 Nitro(Out of service for a few weeks) and a collection of micros. Don't we all need more helis

I really hate the limited flight times with electrics. With my 500 I am lucky to get 5 minutes and with my 770 I can squeeze out 7. If I can finally get my nitro working I'm hoping to get 10 minutes or so. The extra few minutes really changes things for me. I'm not sure why but that extra time really helps.

I think my next step needs to be to practice Autos. On the sim it is so easy but as soon as I flick on TH at the field it's a different story. Thx again for the advice and encouragement.

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06-17-2014 02:04 PM  4 years agoPost 14
Richardmid1

rrProfessor

Leeds, England

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For learning 3D you should be able to get more than 5 minutes out of your 500, try dropping the head speed or drop a pinion size.

60% of the time, it works every time!

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06-17-2014 07:42 PM  4 years agoPost 15
Ladymagic

rrKey Veteran

South Korea

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I always wondered when I watch some pilots perform 3D if they are actually controlling the heli or if they were just letting it fly and directing it on occasion. For me I need to have total control. I don't know if that's right or wrong or if it's the slow way to get better.
Whether you are familiar with the maneuver or not, you can tell how much understanding the pilot has just by watching his routine. Look for symmetry, wobble, over control, and the pilots ability to duplicate the action with the same results.

I well trained pilot can fly good lines in any wind conditions and will perform a given maneuver more than once per flight to show that he knows how to initiate, fly, and then exit without eating it. A poorly train pilot might try it once and if he doesn't crash or bail out, he'll go back to the one or two maneuvers he actually does know. Pretty boring to watch.

And yes, you couldn't be more correct. Slow flight requires more skill! Learn to fly each maneuver slow at first. This teaches you how to make minor corrects during the maneuver to keep your routine very clean and symmetrical.

Some may think that flying fast 3D shows a lot of prowess, but I am never impressed....even if they didn't crash. That just means they got lucky. Anyways, 3D isn't such a big deal like it was in the early 2000's. It used to be that "stick banging" meant you were a good pilot with cat like reflexes. But, then people kept seeing the same stuff over and over. Tic Tocs, Caoses, and fast 3D aren't really that impressive. That's just physics, timing, and reflexes.

Have those same guys try and fly a perfect rolling circle or a perfectly symmetrical piro tic toc...and most wouldn't even know how to start it. Can they do a eight point transition hover without bobbling or drifting...even in the wind? Have them fly a whole flight in a slow piro and see if they can put it where they want it...That's what sets them apart from the real 3Ders. The real ones can do the same stuff slow so you can see them actually fly through the stunt..not just rely on physics, gravity, and insane head speeds that could throw the earth out of orbit.

That's what you should strive for. Have a full understanding, take your time, and really challenge yourself and you will be awesome. No need to rush. You got this and when you get there, I would much rather watch you fly than the guy who can just barely misses crashing every time he takes off.

Mellisa

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