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HomeAircraftHelicopterHelicopter Main Discussion › Do you think flying just larger helis makes you crash less?
03-14-2014 02:48 AM  4 years agoPost 1
Trexwilly

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FL USA

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I was wondering, do you guys think that if you stick with flying large machines, like 600+ keeps you from crashing so much?

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03-14-2014 03:07 AM  4 years agoPost 2
AWittleWabbit

rrElite Veteran

O.C., CA

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I tend to fly the larger stuff more conservatively. I also think the bigger stuff is easier fly. So I say yes

Heli-itis sufferer.

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03-14-2014 03:11 AM  4 years agoPost 3
es1co2bar3

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winnetka california

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Willi you not migrating are you? stick to 450 they're awesom
lol.

I was waiting on some honey but there aren't no Queen bee,

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03-14-2014 04:04 AM  4 years agoPost 4
turboomni

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East of the Equator

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I find when flying my big gassers I can fly higher and still see them fine so I have more room for error ,,,my 450 I fly lower but I don't care as much if I crash

Setup is everything, All my heli's can fly far better than I can pilot them

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03-14-2014 05:45 AM  4 years agoPost 5
ZS-JAF

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Nazareth, PA

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Micro BNF vs. Kit makes the difference for me. Smaller helis are harder to fly for sure but if you know your limits it is the same. It still takes a long time to build a 450 kit. It does seem the bigger the heli the less likely the chances are of mechanical failure.

I have a 3D heli, I don't understand why it doesn't do 3D.

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03-14-2014 10:26 AM  4 years agoPost 6
wrongler

rrProfessor

Brewerton, New York

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Bigger is easier to see, more expensive to repair, easier to fly, Just not quite as quick as smaller!

Bill Whittaker

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03-14-2014 10:43 AM  4 years agoPost 7
hemp

rrApprentice

Portland, OR - US

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There is definitely some value in being able to see the model's orientation higher up. For practicing uncomfortable maneuvers I would think yes, to some extent, if you take advantage of the height option, you will crash less.

However once you start bringing it back down to the ground, big helis tend to also be more powerful helis, and more power translates to more speed, and more speed translates to less time to react.

Anecdotally, I owned two 450s and some micros through my first 12 months of flying. And I crashed a lot. I mean .. A. LOT.

Eventually I added a 550 to my fleet (550mm blades vs 325mm - huge size difference) and you know what? I still crashed a lot. I think I've dumb thumbed that thing into the ground an average of every 20 flights or so?

But the thing is, between all of those crashes I was pushing myself hard and simming constantly. So a couple months ago I sold off the 450s and picked up my first 700. The 550 is still sitting in disrepair from my last dirt nap. I have over 115 flights on the 700 without a crash, doing things I had never attempted with the 550 and doing a lot of it on the deck and in tight spaces.

So if you just went by that, then yes, the larger heli crashes less. But that's not because it's easier to fly or even that it's easier to see - it's that I worked my butt off, took the risks, and got better before investing in the giant machine.

When I get around to putting the 550 back together I'm confident I'll get 100+ flights on it as well before the next d'oh moment. Not because of its size, but because of the work put in to improve my skill.

Moral of the story - if you want to crash less, worry less about the heli and more about the thumbs.


Team MikadoUSA
Revolectrix Ambassador

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03-14-2014 10:50 AM  4 years agoPost 8
Trexwilly

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FL USA

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Yeah I guessed the cost and the fear factor play a roll in not crashing say 700 as much. I think larger helis do tend to be a little easier too, so that plays in there too...

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03-14-2014 11:40 AM  4 years agoPost 9
jackp332

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Claremont, Nh USA

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I feel like my 700size gassers are much more stable in flight and easier to see. Also, since I have substantial time and money invested in them, I am probably more conservative than with my 600 nitro birds.

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03-14-2014 11:50 AM  4 years agoPost 10
Richardmid1

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Leeds, England

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Someone already mentioned time and effort building and setting up which is roughly the same between a 450 and a 700. It's not so much the cost of a crash but the time and effort building and setting up to perfection that is the biggest pucker factor for me. So unless it is old and already has a couple of crashes on it I am just as careful flying a 450 than I am a 700. Micro BNF's are a different story, you can almost crash them for fun and keep flying!

60% of the time, it works every time!

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03-14-2014 01:39 PM  4 years agoPost 11
Trexwilly

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FL USA

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Good point Richard the fear of wrecking the perfect setup is another factor!

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03-14-2014 02:25 PM  4 years agoPost 12
michael88997

rrElite Veteran

Lewisville,Tx

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I feel like I crash my bigger machines less because I don't fly them as hard because I don't want to wreck them as said before... for that reason I have also been thinking about sticking with my 480 and beating the snot out of it for a few years and improve my skills quite a bit

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03-14-2014 02:49 PM  4 years agoPost 13
Heli_Splatter

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USA

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I don't think that a guy should go bigger until there is a very good level of confidence in flying. I don't think you know when until you know when. I am pretty confident in tumbling the heli and recovering from any orientation.

I can also say that getting a great price on a TRex550 made all the difference. It made it possible to fly a heli beyond my price range. Moving the FBL made my confidence go up too!

I think that a year or more (in my case) was needed to develop the skill set. I am still not a hotshot and never will be, but I am a good average sport flier. I started too late.

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03-14-2014 03:15 PM  4 years agoPost 14
unclejane

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santa fe, NM, USA

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Since my crashes were 95% pilot error and due to disorientation, or not being able to see the model, going FPV-only is what all but eliminated crashing for me. It's like full-scale, where you only need to learn one skill set and not 25 different ones for each possible orientation you're in.

But still in general you can get into trouble faster with smaller machines simply because of the lower inertia and quicker response. A big machine is just much scarier when it gets away from you, especially a 700 size...

So it's a pick your poison type of thing - small and jittery or large and even more scarily dangerous lol...

Stability in wind is really what the extra money for a large machine buys you. That's the biggest advantage of going big, apart from the better visibility. But I don't think it'll rescue you from crashing a great deal, unless it treats the exact problem (like flying in wind, etc)

LS

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03-14-2014 03:38 PM  4 years agoPost 15
turboomni

rrProfessor

East of the Equator

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I can also say that getting a great price on a TRex550 made all the difference. It made it possible to fly a heli beyond my price range. Moving the FBL made my confidence go up too!
I am putting together a 550 also, my largest electric to date so I can try things on the 450 and 550 and then to my big heli's.
I also think a 450 while rather small does not have to be twitchy and hair trigger type . Use your radio to make it fly more like a bigger heli. Less pitch ,or headspeed ,add expo etc. I think many want max performance out of their smaller heli's,,set it up that way and then have to hang on for dear life. It is not necessary especially with todays electronics.
The benefit will usually be longer run times and less wear on the heli too.

Setup is everything, All my heli's can fly far better than I can pilot them

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03-14-2014 06:30 PM  4 years agoPost 16
Stephen Born

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USA

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Cost high, less fly.

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03-14-2014 06:47 PM  4 years agoPost 17
co_rotorhead

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Centennial, CO, USA

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I spent about a couple hours every night for about a month on the sim learning to hover in different orientations. Once I had that down, I bought a Raptor 50 V2 kit. I built that and it hovered like a dream. From there I used the sim and the Raptor to learn to hover nose-in, forward flight/coordinated turns, then on to loops, rolls, stationary flips, etc. I couldn't imagine trying to learn all that on anything smaller than a 600-size heli. For me, it was sooo much easier than say, a 450. I flew a lot back when I was new and learning and didn't crash that Raptor for several months. When I did finally stuff it, I was trying to doing stationary flips too low with poor collective management.

I've always been of the mind that it is much easier to learn on a larger heli, and THEN you can start having fun with the smaller, more squirrelly ones if that's more your thing/budget. It costs more up front for the larger stuff, but let's face it --this is NOT an inexpensive hobby by any means. Anyway, that's just my opinion.

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03-14-2014 07:46 PM  4 years agoPost 18
Ladymagic

rrKey Veteran

South Korea

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It's already been stated a million times, but larger machines tend to be easier to see and are just simple more stable in all weather and wind conditions. Does that play a role in crash prevention? Yes and no.

I think no matter what you fly, you will crash signifigantly more if you do not take the time to refine your flying skill and you don't care for your machine. I personally spent close to 3 years just hovering. I got to the point where I could hover without a thought.

In 10 years of heli flying 450-700 class, I have crashed 4 times. One was a battery failure, the other was a pipe flange that broke off during a caos, another I was just learning inverted flight and didn't have enough negative pitch and went in on the head, and the last was a dump thumb during a low caos on my 550.

I trained alot of other pilots and a key point I always tell them, is to take your time and focus on the basics until you are sick of doing it...then do it some more. You'd be surprised how many pilots out there can "stick bang" all day, but can do decent a side-on or nose-in hover to save their lives...and usually, they are the ones who crash the most at the field.

Mellisa

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03-14-2014 07:59 PM  4 years agoPost 19
jackp332

rrKey Veteran

Claremont, Nh USA

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+1 Well said. I am only on my 2nd year of heli flying and I tend to bore some people at the field with my basic circuits and all-orientation hovering practice. There is rarely a moment, though, in flight that my machine will enter an attitude where my 'mind's eye' does not recognize it and I lose my orientation. I routinely take off and land nose in and left or right facing. I will progress in the future to more advanced maneuvers but for now I am in no rush. I recall a funfly last year we held where these 2 guys were tearing it up and flippin n floppin all over the dang place. But when they were done, they always went into a tail in hover about 20' out and they backed them into the parking/landing spot in front of them like a car lol.

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03-14-2014 07:59 PM  4 years agoPost 20
Sam2b

rrElite Veteran

Tacoma, WA

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My answer: No, unless it is a matter is seeing the heli better. I see some guys crash 700-size helis several times on the same flying day!! Fly/fix/fly/fix repeat.

And I mean a real crash

_Sam B_

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HomeAircraftHelicopterHelicopter Main Discussion › Do you think flying just larger helis makes you crash less?
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