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HomeAircraftHelicopterBeginners Corner › Where to look at the Heli for orientation?
11-05-2013 12:32 PM  4 years agoPost 1
Iflyrc4333

rrApprentice

Dundee, NY - USA

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please forgive me if this have been answered over and over...

BUT

When looking at your heli.. where does everyone look? the skids? the Tail? the Nose? The main shaft?

I can fly "big air" just fine but want to do more and I wonder where I should key in on for the best orientation of the heli ..

Thanks again !

Avise La Fin

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11-05-2013 02:23 PM  4 years agoPost 2
wrongler

rrProfessor

Brewerton, New York

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I think mostly the tail. But you can use what ever is best for you.

Bill Whittaker

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11-05-2013 03:35 PM  4 years agoPost 3
doorman

rrProfessor

Sherwood, Arkansas

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No Right Or Wrong...
I really don't think there is any one place that is better then others...the tail as Wrongler mentioned will certainly help you in direction... but I find myself looking at different things during a flight... the head the tail the skids and whatever else it takes to keep the entire picture in focus...
Tough question to answer, and I think in the end it is going to be you that answers this one for yourself... when you are flying "big air", what are you looking at...and without paying attention while flying, I would bet that at this point you are not 100% certain what is keeping you going up there except for an overall picture!!! Think about it next time flying... then work from there..

Good Luck... it all gets easier with a LOT of practice!!!!

Stan

AMA 2918-Team Spin Blades,,Castle Creations, Unique Aircraft

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11-05-2013 04:18 PM  4 years agoPost 4
fastrc1

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Planet Brooklyn, NY-USA

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I look @ the whole machine. My experience is that if you don't you'll get tunnel vision. Look away also n learn to refocus quick.

RIP Roman Pirozek Jr.
Team Futaba USA
Team Kontronik USA
http://flysrw.com

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11-05-2013 04:57 PM  4 years agoPost 5
grim.the.grim

rrVeteran

Houston, Texas

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All really good answers. I used to focus on the rotor disk and the skids, but I found that if I focused on just one I could easily get disoriented if the bird was in a hover or in slow movement. So I know scan the entire bird, rotor disk, tail, skids, fuse, then back again. This way when you are in slow flight or hovering you don't get disoriented.

*** Real Pilots BEAT the air into submission! ***

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11-05-2013 05:37 PM  4 years agoPost 6
Stephen Born

rrElite Veteran

USA

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A bright canopy always helps.

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11-05-2013 08:24 PM  4 years agoPost 7
YSRRider

rrElite Veteran

usa

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orientation is in your brain

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11-05-2013 08:46 PM  4 years agoPost 8
Iflyrc4333

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Dundee, NY - USA

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Orientation
LOL my brain must be full of cobwebs then... !!! I do pretty well and I do seem to watch the "whole" thing and I even watch the rotor disk...I have trouble when I stop it out there in a turn.. then I lose which way it is going..

All the comments have been great thanks !!

Avise La Fin

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11-05-2013 11:13 PM  4 years agoPost 9
HREFAB

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Long Island NY

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If you fly full size you are taught to scan the entire horizon, left to right, right to left, up and down every 7 seconds or so. I believe that it's the same when you fly Helis. Don't focus on any one particular aspect of the bird, rather look a the whole picture. The heli isn't just a rotor disc or a skid or a canopy or tail, it is an entire machine. If you understand that regardless of position, a left aileron will ALWAYS make the WHOLE MACHINE move left, right to the right etc. you will eventually get a brain fix on orientation that will enable you to see the 'big picture".

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11-06-2013 01:28 AM  4 years agoPost 10
Retired2011

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Lee's Summit, MO

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I mostly focus on the canopy, but as a noobe, I am learning to consider the whole machine when making turns and such.
I find I need to look at more than just the canopy during nose in.

Chet

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11-07-2013 06:34 PM  4 years agoPost 11
Ladymagic

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South Korea

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Eye Level or below:

Main Rotor for attitude and angle/tilt ,skids for depth and altitude, with tail as priority for direction, pitch and to verify attitude against the rotor.

Above Eye Level:

Tail for direction, yaw, and pitch, skids as lowest priority for angle, but can be used to reference against main rotor and tail. Main rotor is priority to verify pitch and tilt angle.

I do not recommend using the canopy as a hard reference due to the fact that the canopy's contoured lines and some paint schemes can throw off accuracy. But it can be used as a low priority reference in conjuntion with your main rotor, tail and skids...

In fact, I recommend you fly a few flights (Hover first) without a canopy so you will be forced to use the tail, skids, and rotor as most new helis are CF black. This will teach you the fly the silouette when the heli is farther away. You will eventually learn to predict your heli's flight position based on your inputs.

No one reference should be used alone. Always use at least two points for reference at any given orientation to confirm visual information before you start an input.

Also, if you lose your orientation during a flight, I find its good to spin the tail around (not too slow, but not too fast) once or twice to reset your senses....as long as it's safe to do so. Works every time for me, but I also fly piros over 75% of the time during a flight. Try not to focus too hard on any reference point as it can cause tunnel vision and even hypnosis where you just zone out from everything except that particular area of the heli.

Hope this helps. Good luck and have fun.

Mellisa

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11-07-2013 07:40 PM  4 years agoPost 12
grim.the.grim

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Houston, Texas

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Well written Ladymagic, great suggestions. Especially...
Try not to focus too hard on any reference point as it can cause tunnel vision and even hypnosis where you just zone out from everything except that particular area of the heli.
I find that I can fall into this very quickly if not using the "scanning" approach. When this happens I just look away from the bird for a split second and then refocus on the bird. I find that the hypnosis issue happens when I fly in an area with a "cluttered" background (i.e. trees, buildings, etc)

*** Real Pilots BEAT the air into submission! ***

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11-07-2013 07:40 PM  4 years agoPost 13
HREFAB

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Long Island NY

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The benefit of forums such as this is that you get to read many different approaches to the same problem. You can learn more in an hour here than in a week by yourself.

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11-08-2013 02:01 AM  4 years agoPost 14
Einzelganger

rrKey Veteran

Campbell, Texas

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I really like Ladymagic's use of at least two reference points at any given instant.

I like to use the skids for a side-in reference along with the canopy.
Nose-in I watch the canopy and blades. Tail-in, I watch the tail, blades, and skids. Inverted, I just try to make sure it isn't coming at me. lol
This is oversimplified, of course, as I try to watch everything at once, but I think these are my primary reference points.

Wayne

I love the smell of nitro in the morning.
RIP Roman

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11-12-2013 09:34 PM  4 years agoPost 15
helienv

rrNovice

St. louis, mo USA

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i learned quickly with no canopy, i some cases the canopy is actually distracting. id go with looking at the whole heli. that way when you get into more complex menu it doesn't get confusing bc your looking for your reference point

start by watching the disk and tail boom though

Team Thunder Tiger Team Futaba

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11-13-2013 06:11 AM  4 years agoPost 16
RogerRabbit62

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Thuerigen germany

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The flightpath and if there is any obstacles in the way.

The rest you can steer "blind". You have a orintation of the heli in your "mental vision". That is the one you should steer.
not the one you are looking at.
That one should only do and go to the places your brain wishes.

latest at all the piro stuff you cannot "look at a place" at the heli. there is no time to "look at" certain place.
You look for path and corrections.
the corrections are totally different steered and synched with the tails orientation.

So a good idea would be to watch the tail (the helis) while flying.

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11-15-2013 11:31 PM  4 years agoPost 17
BENTDABOOM

rrKey Veteran

west seattle

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Had 2 mishaps due to upright mis-oreintation then all control was lost and bang.this happened when I was flying then stopped to hover ata distance, the skids got out of orientation and couldn't figure out how to regain in time, could be time to have my glasses checked cuzz it shouldn't have happened.

Could also be flying planks all these yrs am used to flying far away.Have tried several times with no canopy but everything being black had to be real careful! still need to get more comfortable with these things.Bottom line is to look at the model as a whole

CAUTION!!! politicians may be hazerdous to your well being

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11-22-2013 03:43 AM  4 years agoPost 18
devin120

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Canada

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Focus on the disk and relationship of the heli and you get a complete sub conscious understanding of its orientation with practice. I learned like that...

Miniature Aircraft - OS power - Futaba electronics

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11-22-2013 06:07 AM  4 years agoPost 19
Zaneman007

rrElite Veteran

Texas - USA

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Colors
Look at the colors, like main blades that are white on top and black on bottom. Get familiar with the color of the canopy. Colors are a very important reference.

Last but, not least know which way the heli "should be pointing." In other words; if you flipped it then gave it left rudder you should know which way it's going. Regardless if you lost orientation, you need to trust yourself.

Old Guys Rule!

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11-22-2013 10:55 AM  4 years agoPost 20
devin120

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Canada

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Regardless if you lost orientation, you need to trust yourself.
+1 Such a small sentence yet so important. I know exactly what you mean. You need to commit when you do something and that's why piro hovering is so good up right and inverted.

Miniature Aircraft - OS power - Futaba electronics

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