RunRyder RC
WATCH
 2 pages [ <<    <    ( 1 )     2     NEXT    >> ] 1746 views POST REPLY
Home✈️Aircraft🚁HelicopterBeginners Corner › Why power supplies?
01-09-2013 04:35 PM  7 years ago
Topic Vote0Post 1
Nelson34

rrApprentice

San jose ca

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Why power supplies?
So someone gave me a power supply a whole back and told me to use it for charging batteries with my charger. I see people building custom boxes and even using two in order to do 24 volts? I'm guessing these are for high voltage setups? What's the reasons for these or using a power supply? The largest electric helicopter I'm planning to own, at this time, is a 500. I prefer gassers but still want something to fly at the near by field. Thanks
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-09-2013 04:42 PM  7 years ago
USNAviationjay

rrElite Veteran

Houston Tx USA

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Not sure I follow the question.

You have to have a power supply of some sort to push your chargers.

most chargers do not just plug into a wall socket.

As for 24V these setups are for pushing multiple chargers or 1 charger at a much higher charge rate and amperage in order to shorten charge times on large packs like 6S 5000s

With a good power supply setup and a HV charger you can charge 4 of those in under 30 minutes.
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-09-2013 04:45 PM  7 years ago
RCHSF

rrKey Veteran

NC

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Well they work for most lipo charger balancer that dont have a power supply built in, or any other people that dont have another power source avaible, a pc psu comes in handy. The person that gave it to you may have thought you could use it sometime. Yeah I belive if you got two just a like, you can rig them for 24v to run a high output charger for 12cell. Or if you had two lipo chargers just a like you could run both and charge 2 6s packs at the same time from two psu's. Or one big psu. Most people like the 650watt and up.

Their's a guild floating around on the net for converting a psu for rc use. Sometimes you have to put a load resistor or something on them to get them to push a good steady 12v. I have seen some that would drop below 12v.
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR  Quote
01-09-2013 04:51 PM  7 years ago
Nelson34

rrApprentice

San jose ca

MyPosts All Forum Topic
How do I know if my charger has a power supply? I have a older Hyperion and just plug it in, set it and wait for a battery to charge. What would using a power supply change?
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-09-2013 04:55 PM  7 years ago
USNAviationjay

rrElite Veteran

Houston Tx USA

MyPosts All Forum Topic
if you plug it in to the wall it has a power supply.

high end chargers do not unless they go through a power supply.
you plug the power supply to the wall.
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-09-2013 04:55 PM  7 years ago
fastflyer20

rrKey Veteran

N. Tonawanda, NY

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Yours has a built in power supply.

The higher power chargers require an external power supply.
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-09-2013 04:57 PM  7 years ago
Nelson34

rrApprentice

San jose ca

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Sorry about that USNAviationJay. My question is why use a power supply? I've always just plugged my charger into a wall outlet, set my charger, hooked up battery and charged. Someone gave me a power supply and told me to hold on to it but I have no idea what to do with it. I've recently noticed more people using one and even selling custom 'boxes' with them already setup. I'm not sure it's something I would use since my only electric is a 500?
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-09-2013 05:05 PM  7 years ago
JKos

rrProfessor

Redondo Beach, CA

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Nelson,
The only chargers available with built-in power supplies are relatively low power and will take a while to charge batteries for a 500 size heli.

More capable chargers (higher output Wattage capability) do not have internal power supplies that allow them to be directly connected to 120 V AC and, thus, a seperate power supply is necessary.

"I've recently noticed more people using one"
Because most chargers used for e-flight do not have a built-in power supply.

What charger do you have?

- John
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-09-2013 05:17 PM  7 years ago
Nelson34

rrApprentice

San jose ca

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Oh got it-I have been using a older Hyperion that I bought with a Trex 450v2 a couple years back. Not near it now so don't know the model number. Does take a while to charge! What is a good charger or chargers to look into? Why don't high end chargers have power supplies built in?
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-09-2013 05:29 PM  7 years ago
USNAviationjay

rrElite Veteran

Houston Tx USA

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Powerlab 6 or 8s from FMA are my choice.

they do not include power supplies as people have different needs.

So that allows people that want monster setups to have them.
mine is 1900 watts 72 amps 24V for charging my large 6S packs 4 at a time.
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-09-2013 05:35 PM  7 years ago
Wynn1427

rrApprentice

Ca. 93612

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Best bang for the buck is in the iCharger lineup. Lots of good reviews and a good overall solution for a simple charging solution.

Seems there are a lot of off the shelf solutions for power supplies so why waste time and money devloping and integrating it into your own charger. I suspect another reason that high end chargers don't have a power supply because of cost. Imagine having to fork over another $100-$300+. With the right planning you can run mutiple chargers off of one power supply.

Wynn
Logo 550sx
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-09-2013 06:49 PM  7 years ago
YSRRider

rrElite Veteran

usa

MyPosts All Forum Topic
SOME chargers are 120V/12V. If you have a 12V only...... you have no choice but to power it with a power supply. I thought this was standard knowledge in the R/C world?
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-09-2013 06:54 PM  7 years ago
Nelson34

rrApprentice

San jose ca

MyPosts All Forum Topic
So the charger I have, which has a 12 volt DC and AC input, probably wouldn't need a external power supply. It's a older model and somewhat outdated and underpowered for today's newer models. It would still work fine, but charge times will be slow and one pack at a time. In order to get faster charge times and be able to do multiple packs, a newer more efficient charger capable of higher output requiring a external power supply is what I need?
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-09-2013 07:22 PM  7 years ago
JKos

rrProfessor

Redondo Beach, CA

MyPosts All Forum Topic
So the charger I have, which has a 12 volt DC and AC input, probably wouldn't need a external power supply.
Correct. It may, however, have slightly better capabilities when using an external power supply. Some of the 120 V AC/12 V DC chargers are like that. Getting the model number will help answer that question.

Also, what are the specs on the power supply?
It would still work fine, but charge times will be slow and one pack at a time.
Assuming it can handle the number of cells of your packs, yes. Time is the only factor after that. Technically, even a less capable charger can handle parallel charging, it will still just be slow.
In order to get faster charge times and be able to do multiple packs, a newer more efficient charger capable of higher output requiring a external power supply is what I need?
Correct.

- John
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-09-2013 07:36 PM  7 years ago
Nelson34

rrApprentice

San jose ca

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Ok thanks for all the food for thought! Yes I will go home and check my charger and power supply and post. I wish I was the type of person that could read and absorb information well. I unfortunately have always been a 'hands on' type of person. RC helicopters definately are a challenge for someone like me, but I hope to learn as much as I can about them. Appreciate everyone taking the time to answer my questions and your patience.
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-09-2013 09:49 PM  7 years ago
T-Rex-Flyer

rrElite Veteran

Panama City, Fl

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Nelson it's a changle for eveyone, you're not alone.
Go to any of your local flying sites and see what they used for the various applications. There not a single answer for any particular application, find what works for you and what you think you may be into in the future. Unfortunately the future changers quickly in this hobby, so expect things to changes in unexpected direction. Have fun.
Terry.
If the wings are traveling faster than the fuselage, it's probably a helicopter.
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR  Quote
01-10-2013 12:03 AM  7 years ago
Nelson34

rrApprentice

San jose ca

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Thanks for the encouragement! So I have a Hyperion EOS0606i charger.
I don't really understand all the numbers thrown around about amps., etc.
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-10-2013 01:46 AM  7 years ago
dkshema

rrMaster

Cedar Rapids, IA

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Hyperion EOS 0606i:

Charge 1-6 Lipo, 1-6 LiFePO4/A123, 1-14 NIMH-NICD cells
Up to 6 amp charge rate
Comes with Integrated LBA Balancer
Includes Hyperion 2S-6S Multi-Adapter
Comes with a data port
11-15V DC only (needs a separate power supply)
50 watt max(not great for high-capacity 4S-6S packs)
1-year guarantee

This charger balances your pack while it's charging.

Charge and Discharge modes (and cycling for NIMH and NICD)

Clear and easy to read LCD screen with warnings for common setup errors.

Note: This charger requires a 12V DC power source like a car battery.

If that is indeed your charger, it requires some form of external power source for it to work. It does NOT plug into the wall, and it does NOT use an AC input.

The power source must be something on the order of a 12V DC supply. A car-battery would be one option. An AC powered (plug it in the wall socket) DC power supply that outputs at least 12V DC would work. It would need to be capable of somewhere on the order of at least 50 - 60 watts output power.

-----

The charger you say that you have, when powered by an adequate external power source will allow you to charge:

1 to 6 Lithium Polymer cells wired in series -- OR
1 to 6 Lithium Iron Phosphate cells wired in series -- OR
1 to 14 Nickel Metal Hydride / Nickel-Cadmium cells wired in series.

You can charge the batteries at charge rates up to, and including 6 amps. BUT ONLY IF THE BATTERY PACK IS CAPABLE OF SAFELY ACCEPTING A CHARGE RATE OF 6 AMPS. Not all packs are equal when it comes to maximum charging rates.

The charger has a maximum output rating of 50 watts. That means if you are charging six Lithium Polymer (LiPo) cells wired in series ("6S" -- whose fully charged output voltage would be 25.2 volts), the maximum charge current you can deliver would be:

50 watts / 25.2 volts = 1.98 amps.

If you were charging a 2S LiPo (2 cells wired in series, maximum voltage of 8.4 volts), the maximum charge rate would be:

50 watts / 8.4 volts = 5.95 amps.

(Power = Volts X Current), (Power / Volts = Current)...

-----

The charger accepts a DC input voltage of 12 to 15V DC, a 15V DC source would make the charger a bit happier than if it were run from 12V DC).

-----

The charger will balance charge Lithium Polymer batteries, a good thing.

-----

You say the largest helicopter you "plan" to own (somehow we all "plan" to own, but in reality the helis take over and they own you) is a 500.

If that is the case, you will most likely end up buying LiPo packs that would be described as "6S 2650 mah". Each pack consists of six cells wired in series ("6S", having a capacity of 2650 milliamp-hours (2.65 amp-hours). (You might also end up with 6S 3000 mah packs as these are the two most common sizes that people seem to end up with, in a 500 heli).

That 6S pack would have a fully charged output voltage of 25.2 volts, a "nominal" output voltage of 22.2 volts, and a discharged voltage of 18 volts. A single discharged LiPo cell has a terminal voltage of 3.0 volts. During its normal discharge cycle, its output voltage will be nominally 3.7 volts, and fully charged, its output voltage will be 4.2 volts

The mah rating is the energy storage capacity of the pack. A 2650 milliamp-hour (2.65 amp-hour) rating tells you that when fully charged, the pack can continuously deliver 2650 milliamps (2.65 amps) to a load for one hour before it is considered discharged. It can also continuously deliver 5300 milliamps (5.3 amps) to a load for 1/2 hour before it is empty. Or, it can deliver 1325 milliamps (1.325 amps) continuously for two hours before it is discharged.

-----

A 50 watt charger to keep a 500-sized heli would work if you have a bunch of battery packs that you could charge and take with you to fly. Use 'em up, go home, recharge each pack, repeat. It will, however, be time consuming and sometimes just plain boring, sitting there watching over a hot charger.

At a maximum charge rate for a 6S pack of just about 2 amps, each empty pack will take a little more than an hour to charge. If you own six battery packs, you get six flights of about 5-1/2 minutes each and it will take at least six hours to recharge all six packs. That's a lot of time charging, and with LiPos, you really don't want to just plug them in, turn them on, and come back in an hour. That means you'll spend a lot of quality time with your batteries as you try to charge all six before the next flying session.

-----

MOST LiPo capable chargers on the market today do NOT have built-in AC to DC power supplies which simply plug into a wall socket. Some that are good for up to 3S packs might, but when it comes to batteries for a 500 heli, you're better of with a charger that is DC powered, capable of charging 6S packs of 2000 mah or greater, and a separate, but adequate AC to DC power supply to run it.
-----
Dave

* Making the World Better -- One Helicopter at a time! *

Team Heliproz
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-11-2013 06:02 PM  7 years ago
Nelson34

rrApprentice

San jose ca

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Wow! That's a lot to take in-at least for me. Thanks so much for that breakdown. I'm going to have to re read all that a few times but this is exactly the information I really want to understand.
As for the charger, that's not my charger unfortunately. I will verify what I have, but I know unplug it in and that's not a picture of it. I also know that it takes a long time for it to charge my batteries! I saw Hyperion makes a 'dual' model-is Hyperion a good brand to stick with?
Thanks again!
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-11-2013 07:08 PM  7 years ago
Wynn1427

rrApprentice

Ca. 93612

MyPosts All Forum Topic
As for the charger, that's not my charger unfortunately. I will verify what I have, but I know unplug it in and that's not a picture of it. I also know that it takes a long time for it to charge my batteries!
Guessing you have this AC/DC version? if so all the info provided by dkshema still apply. Otherwise key data to look for when calculating will be max output and max charge rate (one of these is going to limit how fast you can charge a lipo).

Wynn
Logo 550sx
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
WATCH
 2 pages [ <<    <    ( 1 )     2     NEXT    >> ] 1746 views POST REPLY
Home✈️Aircraft🚁HelicopterBeginners Corner › Why power supplies?
 Print TOPIC  Make Suggestion 

 5  Topic Subscribe

Saturday, August 8 - 4:02 pm - Copyright © 2000-2020 RunRyder   EMAILEnable Cookies

Login Here
 New Subscriptions 
 Buddies Online