RunRyder RC
WATCH
 2 pages [ <<    <    ( 1 )     2     NEXT    >> ] 4366 views POST REPLY
HomeAircraftHelicopterSafety - RC Helis are not toys › Spotlight Night Flying
10-25-2012 05:51 PM  5 years agoPost 1
Ace Dude

rrProfessor

USA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

I assume rule B.8 means no Spotlight Night Flying. What are your thoughts?

Academy of Model Aeronautics National Model Aircraft Safety Code, Effective January 1, 2011

8. RC night flying requires a lighting system providing the pilot with a clear view of the model’s attitude and orientation at all times.

  

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
10-25-2012 06:18 PM  5 years agoPost 2
BladeStrikes

rrElite Veteran

Shelby TWP,Mi

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

The rules are what they are and you need a lighting system <--Not hard to understand and doesn't say anything about you can't use spot lights.If its spot lights or lights on the heli,its a lighting system.Even flying under street lights is a lighting system that allows you to see the heli..

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
10-25-2012 06:45 PM  5 years agoPost 3
Ace Dude

rrProfessor

USA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

I can't possibly see how a spotlight provides: "a clear view of the model’s attitude and orientation at all times."

  

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
10-25-2012 07:22 PM  5 years agoPost 4
Darren Lee

rrElite Veteran

Woodstock, GA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

You wouldn't understand unless you've done it before. Spotlight flying done correctly provides a very clear view and is surprisingly easy.

Team Synergy / Rail Blades / Morgan Fuel

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
10-25-2012 08:02 PM  5 years agoPost 5
Ace Dude

rrProfessor

USA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Looks like this has come up before:

https://rc.runryder.com/t620660p1/

I have to agree completely with Dood on this one.

  

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
10-25-2012 10:31 PM  5 years agoPost 6
ShuRugal

rrKey Veteran

Killeen, TX

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

You wouldn't understand unless you've done it before. Spotlight flying done correctly provides a very clear view and is surprisingly easy.
Until the spotlight operator fails to track the model. In which case you are now in violation of the last bit here...
8. RC night flying requires a lighting system providing the pilot with a clear view of the model’s attitude and orientation at all times.
that doesn't say "the entire time the model is in the spotlight" or "at all times except for one or two seconds" it says "at all times".

Why is this important? Next time you are flying, close your eyes, count five seconds out loud, then open your eyes. What? don't think that's a good idea? You'd be right. And flying unexpectedly out of a spot light at night is exactly the same thing, with one major caveat: no one can see where it is going to land, so any hope of getting out the way is also gone.

AMA 700159

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
10-26-2012 02:02 AM  5 years agoPost 7
BladeStrikes

rrElite Veteran

Shelby TWP,Mi

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

ShuRugal
You wouldn't understand unless you've done it before. Spotlight flying done correctly provides a very clear view and is surprisingly easy.
Until the spotlight operator fails to track the model. In which case you are now in violation of the last bit here...
8. RC night flying requires a lighting system providing the pilot with a clear view of the model’s attitude and orientation at all times.
that doesn't say "the entire time the model is in the spotlight" or "at all times except for one or two seconds" it says "at all times".

Why is this important? Next time you are flying, close your eyes, count five seconds out loud, then open your eyes. What? don't think that's a good idea? You'd be right. And flying unexpectedly out of a spot light at night is exactly the same thing, with one major caveat: no one can see where it is going to land, so any hope of getting out the way is also gone.
Do you know anything about night flying,see it or done it?Sounds like you haven't because if ya did,you'll know helis with night setups sometimes go out.Some run everything off one battery and ive seen lights go out because the wire got cut in flight,battery fell out ect..

Get a grip people and stop whining about others having fun ..Heck,I seen many helis during the DAY that you loose site of because the canopy ect... blends in with everything..

+1 on what beeflyer2 said...

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
10-26-2012 04:18 AM  5 years agoPost 8
Ace Dude

rrProfessor

USA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

+1 on what beeflyer2 said...
I guess beeflyer2 was singing a different tune on the same subject in this thread:

https://rc.runryder.com/t620660p1/

  

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
10-26-2012 04:19 AM  5 years agoPost 9
Ace Dude

rrProfessor

USA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Get a grip people and stop whining about others having fun ..Heck,I seen many helis during the DAY that you loose site of because the canopy ect... blends in with everything..
Maybe some folks should get a grip and stop flying irresponsibly before someone gets seriously injured.

  

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
10-26-2012 04:35 AM  5 years agoPost 10
RappyTappy

rrProfessor

Traveling the USA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Personally, I don't see spotlight flying (with 2 or 3 people using the spotlight at the same time) any more dangerous than flying with a lighting system onboard. With 3 people using spotlights, I would say that it is the same chances of failure with onbaord system with 2 blades lighted independently and the body/tail lighted by a battery.

From the spotlight vids I've seen, those spotlight have a pretty wide range of light and it doesn't seem like you have to keep the spotlight on the heli like a laser beam. Also, I have flown under bright spotlights before like in a baseball park and the intense light actually makes the disk and heli even more visible than with a onboard lighting system in my experience. Even on the foamy planes, they have gone to adding spotlights on board because the visual orientation is much better when lighting the whole aircraft than looking directly at LED's for orientation.

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
10-26-2012 04:43 AM  5 years agoPost 11
BladeStrikes

rrElite Veteran

Shelby TWP,Mi

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Ace Dude,
Don't knock something you never seen in person or tried..Videos look crappy,you can see the heli BETTER with spot lights than you can with a night setup..

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
10-26-2012 05:05 AM  5 years agoPost 12
Ace Dude

rrProfessor

USA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Don't under estimate the power of common sense.

  

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
10-26-2012 05:24 AM  5 years agoPost 13
BladeStrikes

rrElite Veteran

Shelby TWP,Mi

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

When someone makes comments about something they knw nothing about,it shows how much common sense they have so i'll +1 ya on that..

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
10-26-2012 05:24 AM  5 years agoPost 14
Dood

rrProfessor

Wescanson

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

The turbine safety regulations have been amended in April 2011. The rule now states:

"Rotary wing models require an onboard illumination system providing the pilot with a continuous
and clearly illuminated view of the model’s attitude and orientation at all times"

Expect to see other guidances from the AMA to prohibit spotlight flying real soon.

  ▲
▲ ▲

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
10-26-2012 06:00 AM  5 years agoPost 15
RappyTappy

rrProfessor

Traveling the USA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Easy to satisfy a 'onboard illumination' install some glow sticks on the skids and tail and then spotlight night fly for the visual effect. I remember watching Curtis night fly a heli with glow sticks like that, obviously plenty enough for attitude and orientation.

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
10-26-2012 10:31 AM  5 years agoPost 16
Darren Lee

rrElite Veteran

Woodstock, GA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

I guess beeflyer2 was singing a different tune on the same subject in this thread:

https://rc.runryder.com/t620660p1/
You are correct, that was before I tried it myself.

Team Synergy / Rail Blades / Morgan Fuel

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
10-31-2012 09:45 AM  5 years agoPost 17
1tonv

rrApprentice

Pontiac, michigan. U.S.A.

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

i've watched spotlight flying close up and i will say this. its my opinion that the heli is alot more visible then my 3s lipo setup. now my 3s setup is bright but its not as visible around. how can i explain this the led forms a glow like a ring around the heli, lets say 20ft circle. with the two spot lights blaring EVERYTHING AND ANYTHING in their path is lit up. hope you guys understand. like lon said ive seen batteries fall right off night setups. so we can sit here a debate all day long but if your that up tight then BOTH ARE UNSAFE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! in their own ways. this hobby has its risks ive watched plenty of helis go out of control in daylight, some right into crouds. now i could say anything with carbon blades spinning that fast that close to a croud of people is unsafe. and so on and so on and so on u can sit and analyze all day long why not be out flying instead?????????????

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
10-31-2012 10:48 PM  5 years agoPost 18
rocket_33

rrElite Veteran

Mount Pleasant, Michigan USA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

I understand people like to have fun and try new things. I would just say to keep this in mind, all the "fun" you want goes out the window when lawyers become involved. If, for example, a heli went out of control and went into a crowd of people and injured or killed a person, you have just given the attorney something to demand a higher settlement. Also, do you really want to take a chance of not being covered by insurance just because "your" interpretation does not meet the AMA's interpretation?

It simply is making sure the I's are dotted and the T's crossed.

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
09-18-2013 04:32 AM  4 years agoPost 19
TMoore

rrMaster

Cookeville, TN

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

I've seen a few models leave the spotlight zone and fly away. I'm not a fan of this type of flying.

Back in the early days of night flying we used to use cyalume sticks on the tail boom and skids. Night blades were wood with 100 mah button cells in the tips for weight. Spotlight flying should have lights on the heli as a backup.

Delayed Response Operator Not Engaged
AMA SECTION 336 = Good
Drones = EVIL

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
09-18-2013 05:02 AM  4 years agoPost 20
Tyler

rrElite Veteran

Chicagoland area

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Wouldn't lights on the helicopter be overpowered by the spotlight, thus making it appear normal, but, if the heli ever flew out of spotlight aim the night rig would be visible and possibly save the model and improve safety?

Why not use the best of both worlds? There are benefits to both.

Kinda like, "Hey, you got peanut butter on my chocolate!" "No, You got your chocolate in my peanut butter!"

Enjoy things that money can buy IF you don't lose the things money can't buy.

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
WATCH
 2 pages [ <<    <    ( 1 )     2     NEXT    >> ] 4366 views POST REPLY
HomeAircraftHelicopterSafety - RC Helis are not toys › Spotlight Night Flying
 Print TOPIC  Make Suggestion 

 10  Topic Subscribe

Thursday, August 16 - 3:28 am - Copyright © 2000-2018 RunRyder   EMAILEnable Cookies

Login Here
 New Subscriptions 
 Buddies Online