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HomeRC & PowerAircraftHelicopterRadio - Servo - Gyro - Gov - Batt › Help: Soldering balancing wire
09-27-2012 03:49 AM  6 years agoPost 1
rudyy

rrElite Veteran

E. Amherst, NY

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I have a red balancing wire detached in my 6s lipo. Does that wire go to the same terminal as the big red 10 gauge wire?

Rudy

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09-27-2012 10:42 AM  6 years agoPost 2
wrongler

rrProfessor

Brewerton, New York

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Cut the plastic away on the top of the lipo (carefully) and you will see where it came from.

Bill Whittaker

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10-06-2012 03:10 AM  6 years agoPost 3
GMPheli

rrElite Veteran

W. Bridgewater, MA USA

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Does anyone know what kind of solder is used here. Anyway to tell if it is non lead based? Will regular lead based solder mix with non lead based?
Thanks

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10-06-2012 01:45 PM  6 years agoPost 4
wrongler

rrProfessor

Brewerton, New York

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I just use lead free silver solder. I add my own flux.

(edited) Thanks.

Bill Whittaker

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10-06-2012 01:53 PM  6 years agoPost 5
Ace Dude

rrProfessor

USA

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I hope you don't mean solder with silver in it. Silver solder is not needed for electronics. Regular electronics lead/tin solder w/flux available at radio shack will work fine.

I use Kester 63/37 eutectic solder myself.

  

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10-06-2012 03:36 PM  6 years agoPost 6
G-Limo

rrApprentice

Europe

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Unless you are a 'Tree Hugger' - use whatever comes to hand!

Unleaded is more environmentally friendly, but I guess you have no desire to bury the battery in the ground.. Leaded doesn't suffer so much with creep of the alloy over time.

/DG

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10-06-2012 07:05 PM  6 years agoPost 7
GMPheli

rrElite Veteran

W. Bridgewater, MA USA

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I am just asking if they are compatible? Has anyone used lead based solder here and did it work?

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10-06-2012 09:34 PM  6 years agoPost 8
Ace Dude

rrProfessor

USA

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Lead based solder should work fine. The only time you need to worry is if you're using a lead-free iron/tip. You don't want to contaminate it with leaded solder.

  

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10-07-2012 12:23 AM  6 years agoPost 9
Zaneman007

rrElite Veteran

Texas - USA

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Lead based, Non-lead based, sounds like we are talking about plumbing?

You definitely don't want to use lead based on your plumbing,

I prefer to use solder without flux. I apply the flux myself, before soldering. The key is to have clean joints and solder tip. If not, the required temp goes way up. All those melted deans plugs are mostly due to dirty solder joints.

The only other concern is the size of the wire. Some of these new batteries are coming stock with what appears to be 10 gauge wire or bigger? A small solder iron, adequate for servo wires, just will not get hot enough.

Old Guys Rule!

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10-07-2012 01:53 AM  6 years agoPost 10
Ace Dude

rrProfessor

USA

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Obviously we're not talking about plumbing but lead-free solder has been in use for years in electronics as well. In many places it's required by law. Problem is, lead-free is quite difficult for hand soldering.

I've always used rosin core solder, never had a problem. Have also used extra rosin when necessary.

  

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10-07-2012 04:26 PM  6 years agoPost 11
rexxigpilot

rrProfessor

Florida

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60/40 or 63/37 rosin core solder is probably the best for soldering all your electronics. The 60/40 is slower to set once it is melted compared to the 63/37. This gives a little time to move/adjust the items being soldered after the solder melts and the heat/iron is removed. 63/37 sets almost instantly once it reaches it melting/freezing point. If you don't have something to hold the pieces to be soldered still until set, the 63/37 can get cold joints easier. If you can solder very well, you can solder faster with 63/37. I find 60/40 best for me.

Lead free solders are more difficult to work with as they melt at higher temps.

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