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HomeAircraftHelicopterEngines Plugs Mufflers Fuel › Engines made specialy for helicopters
08-11-2012 07:08 PM  5 years agoPost 21
bobbyra

rrApprentice

Fort Myers Fl

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http://www.eastcoastvario.com/index%20splash.html

Look at this one.Helicopter kit Sky Fox Boxer

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08-11-2012 07:44 PM  5 years agoPost 22
TruckRacer

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Des Moines, Iowa

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The Honda and Stihl 4 strokers are fairly large, heavy engines compared to the Zenoah 2 stroke. I might be wrong on this but I believe the Honda also uses oil in the crankcase like most conventional 4 strokes. That could be a problem. I have read in other forums about using these engines in plank applications and there have been problems making these engines run reliably for that application. It might be a real problem using these in a more demanding heli application. The main problem seems to the be the EPA adjustment restricted carb that just doesn't seem to work well in an aero environment, making replacement necessary. It seems difficult to adapt 2 stroke Walbro carbs to the 4 stroke engine. There is a lot of info about converting these engines if one does the searches.

Now if a guy likes to tinker more than fly .... have at it and the rewards could be quite enjoyable.... or not. For me, I would just go with the proven 2 stroke gasser and enjoy the fuel economy.

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08-11-2012 08:00 PM  5 years agoPost 23
dkshema

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Cedar Rapids, IA

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If you are looking for fuel economy, your best bet is to just build a gasser heli, using the appropriate two-stoke gasoline motor designed to fit.

You can use the standard gas/oil mix, or you can even run Coleman fuel/oil mix in it. You can fly for pennies per flight and a tank of fuel goes a long way.

Finding and modifying a 4-stroke gasoline engine, then fitting it in the airframe may give you great fuel economy but may make the heli heavy enough that it wouldn't be worth the effort.

There was a time you could just take a standard airplane motor and bolt it into a heli airframe and go fly. But as the helicopter established itself in the hobby, motors began to be purpose-made. Larger bore carburetors, three-needle carbs to improve running throughout the throttle range, demand regulator systems for more reliable operation, more horsepower, perhaps different port timing, and of course, massive heads with lots of cooling fin area.

-----

As noted above, many smaller 4-stroke motors don't have their lubrication system designed to run at all orientations.

-----
Dave

* Making the World Better -- One Helicopter at a time! *

Team Heliproz

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08-11-2012 11:55 PM  5 years agoPost 24
shaiko

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Chicago, IL - US

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bobbyra,

what engine does the "Sky Fox Boxer" use ?

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08-12-2012 12:21 AM  5 years agoPost 25
dkshema

rrMaster

Cedar Rapids, IA

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This four stroke is what the Sky Fox Boxer uses:

http://us.vario-helicopter.biz/shop...oducts_id=35304

Nitro powered, not gasoline.

-----
Dave

* Making the World Better -- One Helicopter at a time! *

Team Heliproz

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08-12-2012 12:33 AM  5 years agoPost 26
shaiko

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Chicago, IL - US

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dkshema,

You're correct about the Honda storing it's lubricant in the crankcase. But as far as Honda notes - you can use it in any orientation...
http://engines.honda.com/models/model-detail/gx25
It is VERY heavy though...

Twice as much as the Zenoah with half the power.

Does the Zenoah use electronic ignition or Magneto like the Honda?

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08-12-2012 06:20 AM  5 years agoPost 27
dkshema

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Cedar Rapids, IA

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Zenoah engines manual here:

http://www.horizonhobby.com/pdf/ZEN...-03-02-2007.pdf

More horsepower than your Honda, about twice the RPM.

The four stroke will be heavy, less horsepower, and you will have built an expensive boat anchor.

If you want fuel efficiency and something that will actually fly well, go with a 2-stroke gasser.

I don't know what kind of endurance you're looking for, or why, but unless you install a generator system as well for the radio (such as the Jewel) you're going to need to keep the electronics alive, too.

-----
Dave

* Making the World Better -- One Helicopter at a time! *

Team Heliproz

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08-12-2012 06:52 AM  5 years agoPost 28
Justin Stuart (RIP)

rrMaster

Plano, Texas

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A couple of people have built helicopters that use a Honda 4-stroke. But I've only seen them hover in videos.

Avant RC
Scorpion Power Systems
Thunder Power RC
Kontronik Drives

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08-12-2012 09:37 PM  5 years agoPost 29
shaiko

rrNovice

Chicago, IL - US

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Is there a rule of thump or some kind of rough eproximation for the required engine HP per helicopter weight ?

The Honda gives out around 1.1HP
My machine is around 10 Kg - this will make it seriously underpowered...

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HomeAircraftHelicopterEngines Plugs Mufflers Fuel › Engines made specialy for helicopters
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