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05-29-2012 06:24 PM  6 years agoPost 1
michael88997

rrElite Veteran

Lewisville,Tx

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So I'm planning to start flight school up in June, my friend has recommended to try and find someone with their cfi and a plane to teach me to... Is anybody here a pilot or know one that has their cfi and a plane in the Dallas area?

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05-29-2012 11:46 PM  6 years agoPost 2
FILE IFR

rrApprentice

Anytown, USA 01234

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Do you plan on a career in flying?... or are you just interested in earning a private or recreational certificate?

... Yes, I fly.

Futaba.. Always Imitated, Never Duplicated.

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05-30-2012 12:03 AM  6 years agoPost 3
michael88997

rrElite Veteran

Lewisville,Tx

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Career... I worked at a flight school for a year so I learned a lot there... And have watched kings flight videos twice now fixing to start again... The flight schools around here charge around 8k for private license and most of that goes to feed the guy upstairs

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05-30-2012 12:28 AM  6 years agoPost 4
FILE IFR

rrApprentice

Anytown, USA 01234

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For a great career, this is the school to go to... IMHO

http://www.flightsafetyacademy.com/index.php

Futaba.. Always Imitated, Never Duplicated.

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05-30-2012 01:15 AM  6 years agoPost 5
Eury

rrProfessor

Dover NH

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I agree with that. I went to a couple of schools, and Flight Safety is hands down the best I've seen. Now that I fly for the airlines, I still go to Flight Safety, in fact I was down at their facility in Houston last week for some sim training.

Now, if you are just flying for fun and not intending to do it as a career (and please, please, please reconsider doing it for a career) I'd go to the local airport and talk to the CFIs there and find one you connect with. The 2 of you will be spending a lot of time together and invariably your first instructor's habits will become part of yours.

Nick Crego

Citizen #0168

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05-31-2012 04:08 AM  6 years agoPost 6
MAVRICK

rrVeteran

Northwest Georgia

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got my PPL two years ago with 53hrs. total and it cost me about $8k to get it. Going to school this fall to get my A&P cert.
I would have gone with a similar route but i didn't want to be $70+ in debt. Plus I can't get a loan anyways. So my plan as of now is to earn my A&P and work my way up.

best of luck to you

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06-26-2012 11:28 PM  6 years agoPost 7
helibill

rrApprentice

London, Ontario, Canada

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I'm a flight instructor in Canada and have some advice for you that will save money.

If you are going to do it, fly as much as possible. For example, I would suggest at least 3-5 times per week. If you fly once a week, your progress will be slow as some time will have to to spent reviewing things as you get 'rusty'. For example, air cadets fly 2 times per day and get their licence in 45 hours in 6 weeks. Flight programs fly for 8-9 months and get a licence in 70-80 hours. Some people spend 2 years and 100+ hours privately.

Progress also depends on the amount of effort you put into your flight training. Come prepared ie. do all assigned homework - don't just read it once, (this isn't like school) this stuff matters, you need to read it enough that you understand it. As far as procedures, you study them so that you can answer confidently and without hesitation. Couch fly a lot (practice the maneuvers out loud and actually think through them and what you are doing).

Read in excess of what you are told to. If you don't know the answer to something, then you need to know the answer. Look it up yourself and if you need clarification, then confirm with your instructor.

If you do all of the above, your progress will be much faster and you will save money.

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06-29-2012 12:05 AM  6 years agoPost 8
seldred

rrVeteran

Newnan, GA

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If you have the option to go through part 141 training, I would recommend looking into it. I took that path, and also know many people who went part 61. I feel the 141 is a little more in depth and you learn a little more. Have you looked at any local airports to see if they offer these programs?

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06-29-2012 04:31 AM  6 years agoPost 9
Justin Stuart (RIP)

rrMaster

Plano, Texas

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I did my private fixed wing at Addison airport. It's a friendly place.

I would go walk around the hangars out there and ask around.

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06-29-2012 05:28 AM  6 years agoPost 10
G200driver

rrApprentice

Arkansas

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You want solid advice....Get rich outside of aviation, and then buy your own plane...

But if you insist in doing it for a living, just know that the days of old are over which means you need to dedicate yourself to 5-10 years of barely making ends meet to get the experience required to move into a position that makes it all worth while..Damn insurance companies dictate the corporate market in many ways.....bear in mind, the airline and corporate worlds are very fast moving/changing markets, and what's here today is sometimes gone tomorrow..you must be dedicated, flexible and willing to make a lot of sacrifices of your time, your family and yourself...I really hate to see someone get into this job market that have had a ton of sunshine blown up their backside by some flight school about how great and easy this job market is in order for them to make a few bucks..just know that it's a very volatile, rapidly changing market, and go into eyes wide open..

I love flying..would I do it again...yes, I would....would I let my kids go into this job market...no...

Good luck with whatever you do..

www.gearlegs.com

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06-29-2012 11:27 AM  6 years agoPost 11
RayJayJohnsonJr

rrKey Veteran

Midwest

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Well said G200driver. Especially the part about your kids!

There, their and they're. It's really that simple.

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06-29-2012 11:33 AM  6 years agoPost 12
Eury

rrProfessor

Dover NH

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As I'm facing a displacement and possible furlough, its good to hear that I'm not the only one who doesn't want my kid to follow my path.

Nick Crego

Citizen #0168

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06-29-2012 12:01 PM  6 years agoPost 13
Justin Stuart (RIP)

rrMaster

Plano, Texas

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You want solid advice....Get rich outside of aviation, and then buy your own plane...
Find yourself a job in healthcare as one of the countless technical professions, and you'll be able to afford general aviation as a hobby. That's a job they can't outsource, and there is fixing to be a LOT of old people needing care. You could go to Collin College, become a surgical scrub tech in 18 months, and then go out and earn $22 an hour. With $22 an hour plus overtime, you'd eventually be able to afford to get your private and instrument rating.

Or join the Air Force, quality for a pilot spot, and get all your hours paid for.

My civilian CFI was dirt poor. He had spent thousands of dollars to finance his CFI, and still needed to get hundreds of more hours before he would be eligible for a commercial spot.

If I wanted to be a professional pilot, I would find some way to borrow the money to get my single-engine fixed wing commercial, get a rotary wing add-on, go spend a few years flying people back-and-forth to the oil rigs in the Gulf of Mexico, and hopefully end up as a pilot on one of the medical evacuation helicopters. You'd only make about $50,000 a year, and you'd have to worry about flying in some pretty in bad conditions (trying to land alongside powerlines and such), but at least there would be a fairly good job for you in the end.

They did a story on NPR last month about how little commercial airline pilots are earning these days, and how many of them needed to have a second full-time job in order to make ends meet. The story said that many commercial airline pilots had borrowed in excess of $100,000 to get the required hours, and yet only earned about $20,000 a year.

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06-30-2012 10:49 AM  6 years agoPost 14
Scotty

rrNovice

Calgary, Canada

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Wow..What a pathetic sense of entitlement I'm reading into this thread.
Referencing pay when you have no experience.
You are speaking about a profession of which management of a multi million dollar asset that belongs to a company,,, managing a complete crew...flying all over the world.. which you have no experience doing.
And the pay is bad...really?
Pay your dues..Just like the rest of the people that worked their way up threw the ranks... That is life.
Aviation has been a great life for me and my family..
28 years into the profession... 11 to go...loved ever minute of it!
For the young people that are looking at it as a career...
go for it...
Its way better than sitting in a cubical looking forward to your 2 week vacation each year.
Scott

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06-30-2012 01:33 PM  6 years agoPost 15
G200driver

rrApprentice

Arkansas

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Scotty,

Not really sure who you aimed this at, but I'll address it...I know all about paying dues..spent 15 years living on peanuts(been doing for 24year now)for flying every piece of crap out there with wings, in the worse weathers, long hours, no pay. Today, the airline job suck and anyone in the industry knows that. It's a terrible life sytle if you have a family, TSA has completely ruined the experience for both pilots and passengers. I spent 2 years dealing with it in the 90's,(even before TSA) so I do know. As far as corporate...it's as volatile today as the airlines unless you get REALLY lucky with who you land a job with. The crash of 2008 market damn sure didn't help anything.

Post was referencing the simple facts that if you are going to fly for a living, be prepared to pay your due, and don't expect it to be like the grand ol' days to aviation, cause they are gone!

BTW, it's a Multi-Billion dollar flight department that I manage, and I do fly all over the world. Now, gotta go, we're buying a Falcon 2000 this morning

www.gearlegs.com

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06-30-2012 02:04 PM  6 years agoPost 16
Eury

rrProfessor

Dover NH

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Wanting a living wage isn't entitlement, Scotty, it's completely reasonable. Yes, we all have to pay our due flight instructing and doing the misc things to get time, and that is the sort of thing that doesn't pay well, but at least you can usually have a second job (That's what I did to make ends meet). Let's address airline jobs.

Do you REALLY think it's reasonable for someone with 1500+ hours and an ATP (That is the new minimum effective Aug 2013 for 121 flying) to go spend their first year with 12-14hr duty days 5 days a week and only make $23K, with a bump to $26k the second year? That is not a living wage when you consider that very few regionals have bases where the cost of living is low enough to afford to live on that pay, and is downright PATHETIC when you consider that a convenience store manager starts at $30k. So to make that $23k you have to invest around $80k+, what other things could you do with that money? Let me answer that, a lot of things that would afford you the chance to fly for fun and actually enjoy it instead of worrying about the next furlough, or whether Delta's TA is going to pass so they will be parking 200+ CRJ200s thus kicking you back down the seniority list and possibly back onto the streets forcing you to start over AGAIN at $23k and on reserve.

Yes, you have more time off than the average cubicle dweller, but at the cost of being away from family and friends, a lack of job security, and substandard wages for years in exchange for exorbitant training costs. Is it worth it? That's for each individual to decide, but too often people get into aviation today having only been told what it was like for the 26 year 767 guy back in the late 80s and early 90s, which is vastly different from the current reality.

Nick Crego

Citizen #0168

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06-30-2012 05:41 PM  6 years agoPost 17
Justin Stuart (RIP)

rrMaster

Plano, Texas

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The medical evacuation helicopter pilots seem to have it pretty good. They are not rich by any stretch of the imagination, but they are usually just sitting around 20 hours of a 24 hour shift waiting for a call which means that they can sleep, eat, and get caught up on other things making it pretty easy to have another full-time job and still see their family.

The only downside is that every 3 or 4 months, a medical evacuation helicopter somewhere in the United States crashes killing all 4 onboard.

But if you're going to go out of this world, you might as well do it wearing night vision goggles trying to land a helicopter on the bank of the river in the middle of the night during a rainstorm.

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06-30-2012 06:17 PM  6 years agoPost 18
Eury

rrProfessor

Dover NH

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But if you're going to go out of this world, you might as well do it wearing night vision goggles trying to land a helicopter on the bank of the river in the middle of the night during a rainstorm.
Awesome quote.

Nick Crego

Citizen #0168

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07-01-2012 12:27 AM  6 years agoPost 19
marc8090

rrElite Veteran

Long Island, N.Y.

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I'm currently employed as a part 121 pilot (major airline). I agree with everyone saying take another career path. If I knew then what I know now I never would of made flying a career. Don't get me wrong, I love the flying, but everything else that goes along with it just down right sucks. Low pay, not as much time off as you think, no job security, etc.

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07-01-2012 04:33 AM  6 years agoPost 20
Smithprod

rrVeteran

Oklahoma

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I just read a book about this very subject, "Squak 7700". What a good book and pretty blunt about pilot careers in todays times. I own a Cessna 150 and fly for fun but I sure wouldn't want to make a career out of it.

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