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HomeAircraftHelicopterFuel-Helicopters New or Limited ActivityAvant › Rusty Pinion from the Aurora E kit
01-27-2012 05:59 PM  6 years agoPost 1
remotemadness

rrApprentice

singapore

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Hi,

I've bought the kit awhile ago.. and didn't have time to go thru it enough..

This is what I've found.. sad and disappointed

will someone help me out here..

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01-27-2012 08:15 PM  6 years agoPost 2
GraZer

rrApprentice

Cape Town, South Africa

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I assume that your rusty pinion is from a new kit?
Difficult call this one. Avant RC may be willing to help and replace the pinion or you may just have to buy a new one. Either way I would suggest replacing it as it will just cost you in the long run with worn out main gears.

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01-27-2012 08:20 PM  6 years agoPost 3
marked23

rrKey Veteran

Lynnwood, WA

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Polish it up with a brass brush wheel on a dremel tool. But wear eye-protection, those bristles are not eye friendly. Try to stay away from the threads, but a little brushing won't hurt them.

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01-27-2012 08:52 PM  6 years agoPost 4
seemore74

rrNovice

London England

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Agree, just clean it up with Mr dremmel & you'll be all good.

Shape 9.0, Outrage Fusion 550, Outrage G5 + Futaba transmission.

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01-28-2012 01:34 AM  6 years agoPost 5
remotemadness

rrApprentice

singapore

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oh.. ok.. no replacement

I'll try and see if I can polish it off..

I actually don't mind replacing it..

Just that from where I am.. It's not easy to get them..

The local shop that I bought the kit from went busted.. can't go back there for help..

And to get from C.X... I'll need to spend US$75 or US$100 before they send out..

thanks guys..

cheers
quest

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01-28-2012 03:22 AM  6 years agoPost 6
Justin Stuart (RIP)

rrMaster

Plano, Texas

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When you buy any helicopter kit, you've got to take all of steel parts out and liberally douse them in oil. From main shafts to tail shafts to pinions to screws to everything else. They can and will oxidize if they are not covered in oil. The higher the carbon content of the steel, the stronger the steel, and also the faster it will oxidize. All helicopter companies will put oil on their parts before they put them in the bag, but the oil will eventually evaporate leaving the steel exposed to moisture and oxygen in the air.

I have a zip lock bag full of Trex 450 main shafts that are soaking in oil as we speak. They have been in the same bag for about 3 years now, and they still look brand new.

But as far as that pinion is concerned, you can clean the rust off with a wire brush. Just make sure you check it for pitting or any damage after you have cleaned it, and then after you have cleaned it, douse it liberally in oil.

Here is a little cup of oil that I have some Aurora spare parts soaking in. They have been soaking in this oil for at least a year, and they still look brand new.

Whenever I build a new helicopter, after all the Loctite has dried I go through and put oil on all of the steel parts. I focus especially on the center of the socket headed cap screws, the pinion, the bearings, the tail pitch slider, and the part of the main shaft where the swash rides up and down. These are the parts that you want to always be covered with oil.

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01-28-2012 05:28 AM  6 years agoPost 7
remotemadness

rrApprentice

singapore

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Hi Justin,

thanks..

I think I just take a lot of things for granted.. of cause steel rust..

I'm buying a gallon of oil now.. hehehehehe..

thanks..
quester

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01-29-2012 05:58 AM  6 years agoPost 8
Hicksy

rrApprentice

Mt Isa QLD Australia

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Might be a stupid question, but what kind of oil? I use Boca lightning lube oil on my heli bearings/shafts etc but its very expensive for a small amount. I dont really want to use it for parts which may just sit for a long time...
Cheers.

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01-29-2012 06:43 AM  6 years agoPost 9
carcrasher

rrElite Veteran

east coast

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Get some marvel mystery oil or 3in1.

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01-29-2012 11:41 AM  6 years agoPost 10
Mike0251

rrVeteran

Hills of the Blue Ridge VA

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Surface oxidation. 30 seconds on a drill press with a brass wire wheel and it will look better than new.

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01-29-2012 12:18 PM  6 years agoPost 11
Hicksy

rrApprentice

Mt Isa QLD Australia

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Cheers Carcrasher i'll check that out. Sorry to drop in on remotemadness' thread.

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01-29-2012 01:30 PM  6 years agoPost 12
remotemadness

rrApprentice

singapore

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Hey.. It's ok..

Good knowledge.. I'm picking up quite a few good tricks

Cheers
Quest

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01-29-2012 05:57 PM  6 years agoPost 13
Justin Stuart (RIP)

rrMaster

Plano, Texas

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I think I remember reading a study once where the guy found "Marvel's Air Tool Oil" (which is much harder to find than Marvel's Mystery Oil) to be the best oil to use for long term preservation of parts. But in all reality, it doesn't matter. Any cheap petroleum based oil should be fine. Your goal is simply to place a barrier between the metal and the oxygen/moisture in the air.

Steel comes in many different grades, from stainless steel to high carbon steel. Steel is by definition an alloy of elemental iron + elemental carbon, but modern steel almost always includes various other elements including vanadium, tantalum, molybdenum, chromium, etc to increase ductility, malleability, corrosion resistance, etc. For parts that need to be extremely strong, a manufacturer will mix in a lot of carbon with the iron but will leave out all of the other "stainless" elements including chromium, molybdenum, etc. This makes the steel stronger, but also generally more prone to rusting (oxidation).

Now it should be noted that steel rusts (oxidizes) much slower than iron (due to the reducing effect of the carbon content), but steel with the "stainless" elements included in the alloy will rust even more slowly.

So the purpose of soaking your "high carbon steel" in oil is to exclude moisture and oxygen. Oxygen is the oxidizing agent which causes the rusting, while moisture (water) functions as a catalyst. If a manufacturer wanted to, they could place their steel in contact with a metal with a higher reduction potential so that the other metal oxidizes (rusts) first (magnesium for example--which is how they keep boat hulls from rusting). Or the manufacturer could pack their steel in airtight containers full of nitrogen or argon gas.

But the easiest and cheapest way to prevent steel from rusting is to soak the parts in oil.

When it comes to oil, there are many grades from very thin to very thick. For MAXIMUM rust protection, a manufacturer would soak their steel in the very thickest oil possible. They might even go a step further and choose grease or wax. But this is messy and inconvenient. If a manufacturer soaked their parts in really thin oil, the oil would evaporate quickly leaving the parts exposed to air and moisture. So a manufacturer has to choose an oil grade somewhere in the middle between really thick grease and really thin oil.

So when you are choosing your oil to soak your steel parts in, you want thicker oil for long term storage and thinner oil for short term storage.

But you don't want to choose organic oils (vegetable oils, soybean oils, olive oil, etc) because they are composed of molecules which oxidize into organic acids that then function as a catalyst to actually PROMOTE oxidation instead of retarding oxidation. In other words, don't use cooking oils on your steel parts.

To make a long story short, some 10W-40 motor oil, or 3-in-1 oil, or WD-40 will all work fine--but with thinner oils you have to apply them more often.

Here is the reaction of iron rusting if you are interested.

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01-30-2012 12:05 AM  6 years agoPost 14
Hicksy

rrApprentice

Mt Isa QLD Australia

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Thats excellent info-cheeers Justin.

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