RunRyder RC
WATCH
 1 page 2917 views POST REPLY
HomeAircraftHelicopterAerial Photography and Video › Parachute for multicopters?
01-25-2012 04:55 PM  6 years agoPost 1
Helikam

rrApprentice

Italy

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Since now imagine an RC Heli Platform with an emergency parachute was impossible because of the main rotor!
BUT what about a parachute for a Multicopter AP Platform in case of a power loss? Any suggestions?

Something like this?

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-25-2012 06:18 PM  6 years agoPost 2
Chris Bergen

rrElite Veteran

cassopolis, MI USA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Something like that...

Chris D. Bergen

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-25-2012 06:30 PM  6 years agoPost 3
R Hudson

rrKey Veteran

Denver, CO

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

There still may be complications though. If motors are 100% stopped and it is falling level, bottom-side-down, there may not be tangled strings when it deploys. However, if it is not 100% level there are multiple props it can still catch on during deployment.

I hope someone does some testing on this. It does indeed seem a bit more viable to do when compared to a helicopter.

I know I would feel a bit more comfortable (mostly for liability reasons) if a reliable ballistic chute existed for these.

Signature

PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR  Quote
01-28-2012 05:07 PM  6 years agoPost 4
Helikam

rrApprentice

Italy

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Chris: Sorry for my bad english!
Hudson: Thanks for your answer!
Right! The strings could be tangled but it's one chance more to save the equipment! hopefully someone does a good product in that direction.

Watch this:

Watch at YouTube

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-28-2012 07:07 PM  6 years agoPost 5
hogfarmer

rrNovice

USA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

A long time ago I considered this idea and even stated making a prototype for regular r/c helicopters using Estes model rocket engines. My idea was to attach the rocket directly to the deployable bag and shoot the whole package strait through the main blades very near the head. The parachute would be on the end of a long single Kevlar webbing that would essentially tangle in the head and stop the blade's rotation before they could wind in too much and damage the chute. Of course with a multicopter it would be even easier, you only need to clear the arms by a few inches and the Kevlar would stop the light weight blades very quickly.

But there are huge legal liability and safety issues considering a design using a rocket on R/C aircraft. Basically there is no simple safe way you can design a deployment system that would be failsafe for the average consumer. Someone would shoot themselves in the face with the rocket and that would be the end of the company.

Also we have to consider the actual survivability of a parachute landing. Even if we are high enough to have a successful deployment (which can take several seconds), then in many cases this will result with the heli landing with significant vertical speed directly on the camera and camera mount, which are usually the most expensive things you are trying to protect. Even with a full deployment and slow deceleration, the final impact with the equipment and a hard surface would still likely cause significant damage. Imagine dropping your entire heli and camera setup from 8-10 feet onto concrete, sure it's better than terminal free fall but it's still going to cause a lot of damage. It's not like a person coming down under a parachute that has it's own built in crumple zone (ankles, knees, hips).

I'm reminded of a high school science project where the goal was to protect a raw egg in a 2 story fall using only a few sheets of paper. The successful designs are not parachute systems but rather simply large crumple zones that slow the final deceleration and pad the egg against the hard landing surface.

In the end I think a quick deployable airbag would be much safer for the user and more practical in most crash situations (added benefit over water too).

PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR  Quote
01-28-2012 07:14 PM  6 years agoPost 6
llbr22

rrApprentice

Oakland, CA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

what about something spring loaded like this? have a servo ready to pull the pin.
http://www.the-rocketman.com/model-recovery.html

Although I really don't know where to put it and how much it weighs.

PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR  Quote
01-28-2012 07:20 PM  6 years agoPost 7
hogfarmer

rrNovice

USA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

The spring loaded idea could work but there are other things to consider. In those rockets the parachute is probably thrown by itself out of the rocket with a very short bridal, but when we are dealing with heli wreckage and possible rotor blades we need to have the parachute inside a deployable bag to get it away from the mess before it tries to open. Basically the deployment bag (the final bag that holds the chute) must be propelled the length of the bridal, so the bridal can exert the force needed to pull the closure pin on the bag and allow it to open. Aerodynamic force is enough to make this happen but only after the aircraft has accelerated in freefall for a few seconds, obviously a big problem when most of your flight is at low altitude.

PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR  Quote
02-04-2012 05:30 PM  6 years agoPost 8
Yeehaanow

rrApprentice

Vermont

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Seems pretty difficult to do well and keep lightweight.

http://www.myresearch.lt/blog/parachute/parachute.phtml

-Tim

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
02-06-2012 03:44 AM  6 years agoPost 9
classic

rrElite Veteran

All over the place!

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

The large round tube under the boom on this helicopter is a ballistic chute unit.

When fired, it would deploy the chute 35 ft out behind the heli, it was fired with a small blasting cap that launched it pretty fast out the back.

The insurance that the UAV company had required that we have these on the helis, however we were never able to actually use it in the field. Frankly,
It just wasn't a practical application for any kind of hobby craft.

The main reasons?
Besides the ovious extra weight issue,
There just isn't enough time for a chute to deploy and open fully to save the aircraft, unless your well over 500 ft and in the correct position for launching it, your going to crash before it has a chance.

Most of the time, when something happens on a heli or any rc aircraft, you only have at best a few seconds to react to save it, and usally those are spent trying to recover control.

Which is worse, ignorance or apathy? I don't know and I don't care!

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
WATCH
 1 page 2917 views POST REPLY
HomeAircraftHelicopterAerial Photography and Video › Parachute for multicopters?
 Print TOPIC  Make Suggestion 

 5  Topic Subscribe

Saturday, December 15 - 1:56 am - Copyright © 2000-2018 RunRyder   EMAILEnable Cookies

The RC discussion world needs to consolidate. RR is now one choice for that. Its software is cutting edge. It hosts on-topic advertising. Help RR increase traffic buy making suggestions, posting in RR's new areas (sites) and by spreading the word.

The RunRyder Difference

• Category system to allow Rep/Vendor postings.
• Classifieds with sold (hidden) category.
• Classifieds with separate view new.
• Answer PMs offsite via email reply.
• Member gallery photos with advanced scripting.
• Gallery photo viewer integrated into postings.
• Highly refined search with advanced back end.
• Hosts its own high end fast response servers.
• Hosts thousands of HD event coverage videos.
• Rewrote entire code base with latest technology.
• No off-topic (annoying) click bait advertising.
Login Here
 New Subscriptions 
 Buddies Online