RunRyder RC
WATCH
 1 page 908 views POST REPLY
HomeOff Topics › 100,000 tons of statecraft US style
01-23-2012 12:28 PM  6 years agoPost 1
Heliguychris

rrKey Veteran

Perth, West Australia

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

So the Iranians said they would block the straits of Hormuz, the buisiest waterway for oil tankers in the world. Blocking of this waterway would be a disaster for the worlds economies, some have said of the scope of the 70s oil shortages.

Its heating up peeps......

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/wor...-of-Hormuz.html

Licensed (CASA) UAV operator certificate holder 1-YFOF5-01 www.helicamaerial.com.au

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-23-2012 12:35 PM  6 years agoPost 2
Heliguychris

rrKey Veteran

Perth, West Australia

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Just thought id add, that each of the Chester Nimitz Class super carriers packs 90 birds, more than the entire Iranian Air Force......

Licensed (CASA) UAV operator certificate holder 1-YFOF5-01 www.helicamaerial.com.au

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-23-2012 03:44 PM  6 years agoPost 3
SSN Pru

rrElite Veteran

Taxachusetts

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

You know what that's called?

100,000 TONS OF DIPLOMACY

Stupidity can be cured. Ignorance is for life!

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-23-2012 04:00 PM  6 years agoPost 4
Dennis (RIP)

rrApprentice

Oregon

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

I'll bet the US Navy can completely destroy the Iranian Navy, including all its land based support and leadership within 48 hours of an engagement.

Liberty once lost, is lost forever.

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-23-2012 09:33 PM  6 years agoPost 5
ticedoff8

rrKey Veteran

Morgan Hill, CA. USA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Yes! Great Idea!

Then we can hoist the "Mission Accomplished" banner that Bush-2 used - and make sure Obama is wearing the same neat flight-suit that Bush-2 wore - makes it look like he has big cock.

Then, after 10 more years of Nation Building we can well and truly be bankrupt - just like the USSR in '89. Except, we don't have the oil reserves that Russia has, so we would stay bankrupt.

Because, after all, do you really think the Iraqi people WANT "Democracy"? Or, do you have delusions that they will embrace our invasion of their country and greet us as "Liberators"?
How well did that work out in Iran?

Oh, and Iraq really does have WMD - at least one nuke, maybe more.

The best "defense" against this "Iraqi BS" is not attack - it is drive 55 ( or slower) and get rid of the 3-ton Buses we call "SUV".
Convert all commercial trucking to LPG (compressed natural gas) and say "To Hell With The Middle-East" - let them work it out.

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-23-2012 09:56 PM  6 years agoPost 6
Heliguychris

rrKey Veteran

Perth, West Australia

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Have you got a link to the Iraq nuke info ticdoff8 ?

Licensed (CASA) UAV operator certificate holder 1-YFOF5-01 www.helicamaerial.com.au

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-23-2012 10:32 PM  6 years agoPost 7
ticedoff8

rrKey Veteran

Morgan Hill, CA. USA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Same source as everyone else: "Them" and "They".

But, it is pretty easy to trace the Pakistani nuclear program to the uranium enrichment plants being built in Iraq now.

The centrifuges that are being used by Iraq are quite capable of making weapons grade material. Cancer research my ass - there aren't that many people in Iraq that need radiation treatment.

They have developed a pretty nice delivery system too - but the rockets don't seem big enough to do a lot of harm: as long as you assume they are going to carry conventional warheads.

Anyone that assumes otherwise is making a big mistake.

And, it is people that say "We can take out the whole Iraqi air force in a day" that are not thinking about this.
With Iran, there was no evidence of WMD - just a bunch of lies based on smoke, mirrors and innuendo.

With Iraq - it is all right in the open.
And, it is being lead by a group of religious zealots who have a long history (rightfully so) of hating Westerners (Europeans mostly, but the US recently).

We won't be the ones to bear the brunt of the retaliation that Iraq will unleash if we try to break their blockade of the The Strait of Hormuz.
It will Israel or Western Europe.
And we KNOW that Israel has at least 20 to 30 short to medium range nukes tee'ed up and ready to go.

You think a blockade of The Strait of Hormuz would hurt the "World Economy?
How about a "small scale nuclear war"?

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-23-2012 10:57 PM  6 years agoPost 8
Heliguychris

rrKey Veteran

Perth, West Australia

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

You sure you dont have those two countries mixed up in that post ?

Sooo, you think we should retire from the area ? Do we then have to pay Iran to use what are international waters ?

Nothing is stopping the Iranian navy from parking one of their super carriers 24 miles of the US coast......

Licensed (CASA) UAV operator certificate holder 1-YFOF5-01 www.helicamaerial.com.au

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-23-2012 11:03 PM  6 years agoPost 9
helicopter

rrApprentice

Omaha, Nebraska

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

tice, you've got your IRAQ and IRAN reversed.

But here on the Shahab 3>>>

Shahab 3
Country: Iran
Associated Country: North Korea, Pakistan
Class: MRBM
Basing: Road mobile
Length: 16.58 m
Diameter: 1.38 m
Launch Weight: 17410 kg
Payload: Single warhead, 1,200 or 800 kg
Warhead: Nuclear, HE, chemical, or submunitions
Propulsion: Single-stage liquid
Range: 800-1300 km km
Status: Operational
In Service: July 2003?
Details
The Shahab 3 is a medium range, liquid-propellant, road-mobile ballistic missile. The Shahab 3 represents Iran’s first successful attempt to acquire medium range ballistic missiles that give Iran the capability to threaten targets (like Israel) which lie beyond Iran’s immediate borders. The original Shahab 3 missile is nearly identical to the North Korean No Dong 1 missile, and almost certainly is based on technology and parts from North Korea. Pakistan has also shared in this technology to build the Hatf 5 missile. Later variations of the missile, which may represent significant domestic technology improvement, are covered in a separate entry.

North Korea, a country that has long supplied Iran with missiles and missile technology, began development of the No Dong 1 in the mid-1980s. Neither North Korea, nor Iran, nor Pakistan had well-developed missile programs at the time, so it is believed that the original technology came from either Russia or China. It seems likely that the North Koreans borrowed engine designs from the Russian SS-3 (R-5) missile, though the No Dong missile is significantly smaller.1 The connection to the Russian missile seems likely for two reasons: 1. Russia has been known to declassify obsolete missile designs, thus allowing them to fall into other hands. 2. The No Dong missile is believed to use the same fuel and oxidizer as many Russian missiles. Regardless of where the technology came from, the North Koreans almost certainly did not build the missile without some outside guidance, as their limited experience would have required far more initial testing than is believed to have been conducted. Moreover, both Iran and Pakistan invested in the North Korean technology prior to much testing – a move that they probably would not have made if the success of the technology was uncertain (as it would be if it had not yet been heavily tested elsewhere).2

Both the No Dong missile and the Shahab 3 missile look much like an oversized ‘Scud’ missile; however, the later missiles represent some major departures that are important from technology and performance perspectives.3 On the technology side, the missiles use an engine that is similar, but larger than that used on the ‘Scud’ missiles. This fact is important because North Korea’s prior experience was almost entirely gained by modifying – not redesigning – ‘Scud’ engines. From a performance perspective, the increased size allows for a significantly increased range without making a missile that is too large for TEL-basing. While using a single-stage liquid propellant engine (like a ‘Scud’), the No Dong and the Shahab 3 employ a separating RV unit. The ability to build a two-stage missile (engine + re-entry vehicle) is potentially a significant intermediate step between short-range, low payload missiles (like ‘Scuds’) and much longer-range, heavier payload missiles.

More at this link: http://missilethreat.com/missilesof...sile_detail.asp

I love gravity, it always keeps my feet planted when I fly!

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-23-2012 11:27 PM  6 years agoPost 10
neilg.

rrVeteran

north of borston

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

NUKE EM

In Nomeni Patri Et Fili Spiritus Sancti

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-24-2012 01:36 AM  6 years agoPost 11
haha

rrApprentice

Woodstock,GA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

i think we should send them a MAP of the middle East without Iran in the map. Send it as a gift.

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
WATCH
 1 page 908 views POST REPLY
HomeOff Topics › 100,000 tons of statecraft US style
 Print TOPIC  Make Suggestion 

 4  Topic Subscribe

Tuesday, August 21 - 2:43 pm - Copyright © 2000-2018 RunRyder   EMAILEnable Cookies

Login Here
 New Subscriptions 
 Buddies Online