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HomeAircraftHelicopterBeginners Corner › scratch build to nose in hover
11-19-2011 01:51 AM  6 years agoPost 1
George Colby

rrNovice

Greentown,Pa

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Hello All,

I would like to build an Align or similar 50 class heli from scratch. What's the best way to go?

I own an T-Rex 600N that I bought used about 7 months ago and flew it carefully a few times. I'm afraid if I crash real bad I will not know how to repair it. Alot of parts on that swatchplate...very intimidating.
I have been flying the MCPX micro, SR-120 and the Blade 400. I crashed the Blade 400 2 weeks ago just making a turn about 50' up and it came down sideways real fast before I could correct it. Bummer!

Also, what is the best way to learn nose in hovering? Is there a secret to it? I try on the sim, but it's real hard.

I can fly pretty well when the nose is in if I'm moving in forward flight.

I thank you for your time,
George C.

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11-19-2011 02:14 AM  6 years agoPost 2
wrongler

rrProfessor

Brewerton, New York

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If you need to see what parts go where, Just download a manual for the heli you are working on.
There is no easy way to learn how to nose in hover, I did most of it on the sim. Just a little at a time and it will come.

Bill Whittaker

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11-19-2011 04:04 AM  6 years agoPost 3
budz

rrApprentice

las vegas

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get a manual and take your heli apart. it'll not only teach you how to build/repair it but it's also an opportunity to maintenance check it.

team solo

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11-19-2011 05:08 AM  6 years agoPost 4
csatellite

rrNovice

Brookings, SD USA

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Practice
George

Practice and more practice. Practice nose in with the smaller birds and use a simulator if you have one. Start with the Blade 400 and with about 1 mistake or so of altitude make sure you are able to "bail" out of nose in hovers. What I mean is set yourself up so that you can get out of trouble if needed. Piro into a nose in stance and try to hold it there. Piro out right away if needed. Keep it high enough and keep trying.

My Blade 400 has been my trainer for the most parts. I have had a few tough hits on it but it is an good enough bird to train on.

Now, don't feel too bad if you practice on the simulator and still dumb thumb it in real life. I did a good job of that the other day. It felt like I shut off my brain when I powered up my Blade 400. It got to take a dirt nap because of it. It happens...at least to me.

Arend

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11-19-2011 10:04 AM  6 years agoPost 5
Neon Juripuri

rrVeteran

Peculiar Mo USA

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Forward flight is how I learned to nose in hover. But I flew airplanes before I started flying helicopters. Unfortunately forward flight will also teach you more about "working" on your helicopter because with the extra speed in a crash it will break more things.
I wish the MCPx would have been out when I learned nose in. I think that is the next best thing or step after the simulator. But practice on the simulator is still hard to beat.
Fred

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11-19-2011 10:37 AM  6 years agoPost 6
Hicksy

rrApprentice

Mt Isa QLD Australia

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This is what worked well for me- do it on the sim untill it starts to feel a little monotonous, then put the training wheels back on(just for that little added confidence), spool up and hover, then pyro round whichever way you're most comfortable with and then hold it. This is how i did it, from the simulator straight to my back yard which is only about 15 foot x 25 foot. I found the instincts i learnt from the sim kicked in straight up and i have not yet even come close to crashing while hovering nose in, actually i think because i practised so hard for so long nose in is actually feeling more comfortable than tail in. Different for eveyone though, i've heard of many people who prefer to learn by spooling up/take off nose in. Either way i think basically it comes down to practise practise practise...

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11-19-2011 11:00 AM  6 years agoPost 7
RappyTappy

rrProfessor

Traveling the USA

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Lol, when I heard 'scratch build' I was thinking milling your own parts and making it all by scratch. But like others said, download the manual and ask questions along the way.

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11-19-2011 06:21 PM  6 years agoPost 8
dkshema

rrMaster

Cedar Rapids, IA

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I would like to build an Align or similar 50 class heli from scratch. What's the best way to go?
1. Buy a kit.

2. Open the instruction manual.

3. Figure out which end of the hex-driver is the handle. If you have trouble with this step, consider a different hobby.

4. Build the kit.

Then, go to your local flying site, get it in the air and PRACTICE. Altitude is your friend.

Meanwhile, if you have a simulator, USE it. If you don't have a simulator, consider BUYING one.

-----
Dave

* Making the World Better -- One Helicopter at a time! *

Team Heliproz

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11-19-2011 06:42 PM  6 years agoPost 9
xv-townboy

rrApprentice

Abbotsford.bc. western canada

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Everything said above.I learned to nose in hover in about two weeks with a Flymentor.It's obviously different when you get rid of it or switch it off but it allowed me to look at the helicopter (nose in) in a stable hover three feet off the deck for the first time in years.I progressed fairly quick from there.Its not the only method obviously but it worked for me..Good luck

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11-19-2011 07:57 PM  6 years agoPost 10
dkshema

rrMaster

Cedar Rapids, IA

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I'm afraid if I crash real bad I will not know how to repair it. A lot of parts on that swatchplate...very intimidating.
Swashplate, not a swatchplate.

Nothing is intimidating if you take the time to understand it. An instruction manual for your 600N is on line,

http://ms.align.com.tw/mpeg/manuals...ters/600NSP.pdf

Setup is not difficult, if you have a local flyer to help you, they can teach you. If not, basic info is everywhere,

https://rc.runryder.com/p4325158/

for example. Radio, basic mechanical setup, gyro, all in one place.

As for that nose-in stuff. You say it's no problem as long as the heli is moving. Simple. Get decent, safe altitude, fly towards yourself, SLOWLY. Then gradually work on the slowly till you're not moving. Time spent practicing is time spent learning.

-----
Dave

* Making the World Better -- One Helicopter at a time! *

Team Heliproz

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11-19-2011 08:20 PM  6 years agoPost 11
MichiganFlyer

rrElite Veteran

Lansing,MI

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The mCPx taught me nose in. I flew it till nose in was something I didn't have to thing about how to control then I started doing it on my larger helis.
Tons of hours of SIM time too.

Friends don't encourage friends to fly helis! It can cause part shortages.

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11-20-2011 11:03 PM  6 years agoPost 12
George Colby

rrNovice

Greentown,Pa

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Thanks all for your imput. I still think there must be a simpler way to hover nose in. LIke in airplanes we imagine ourselves as the pilot in the cockpit.Has anyone use this method. Also putting the 'stick under that thing to lift that wing'.

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11-21-2011 09:09 PM  6 years agoPost 13
ticedoff8

rrKey Veteran

Morgan Hill, CA. USA

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Build a set of trainer sticks for your 600n.

Use 4 arrow shafts, one 2"x2"x1" wood block and 4 2" whiffle balls.

On the wood block, drill holes on the 4 sides that you can slide the end of the arrow shaft into. This forms a big X shape.
On the outer ends of the arrow shafts, slide the whiffle balls. Use rubber bands to secure the balls.

Now, sit the heli at the center of the X. The arrow shafts are the legs, and make sure the legs are 45-degree left & right of the nose of the heli.

Rubber band the legs to the heli skids.

Now, go out an practice your nose in hover at a low level.

If things get out of hand, set the collective to mid-stick (0-degree pitch) and let it settle to the ground. Even if the heli is moving across the ground, the balls keep the legs from digging in and should keep the heli upright.

And, the best way to learn how to repair your heli is to take it completely apart and put it back together. Download the manual and use it as a reference.
If you are afraid of repairing the 600n, you will never learn how to fly

IMHO: The mCP-X is cool - but not a good training aid. Its 3-axis FBL system adds a lot of un-natural stability that isn't in a flybar'ed heli (like your 600n).

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11-22-2011 06:47 PM  6 years agoPost 14
Heli Maine

rrNovice

Embden, Maine

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Hi – fairly new guy here as well.
If I were you the first thing I would do is set up a nice work-bench, download an owners manual (or Finless Bob video from that other website), tear down your helicopter and build it back up. I was intimidated at first too – however by taking my time I found that the building can be a lot of fun as well. It will also take a lot of the fear out of flying (and possibly crashing) the helicopter. My personal opinion is if you don’t learn how to work on the heli this hobby is either going to get really frustrating or really expensive.
If you have an MCPx then use that to practice all your orientations. Although your flybarred helis may be less stable your finger movements will be the same to make any corrections. I went from an MCPx & Phoenix sim to a Trex 450 pro. Although I’m not doing everything on the 450 that I am on the MCPx the learning curve has been minimal.
Good luck to you and remember the most important thing is to have fun!

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11-22-2011 09:33 PM  6 years agoPost 15
Gyronut

rrProfessor

Martinsville In.

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Gerorge

Do yourself a hugh favor and get a sim and practice and stop trying to imagine yourself in the cockpit.

Rick

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11-22-2011 10:05 PM  6 years agoPost 16
Gearhead

rrMaster

Vt

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sim sim sim sim sim sim

1 thing you should not do is set there hovering Tail-In and use the Rudder to bring the Nose around,,
if I was teaching you I would have you do a circle about 20ft in diameter (or larger) and as you come in with the Nose pointing at you I would tell you to pull back on the Cyclic Stick to slow down the heli, then after doing that a few times I would tell you to stop it Nose-In and hold it there as long as you can, then push the Stick forward and do another circle and stop again Nose-In

Jim
Buzz Buzz Buzz

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11-23-2011 12:57 AM  6 years agoPost 17
George Colby

rrNovice

Greentown,Pa

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I will try the circle around and then hold nose in on the sim. I like taht idea. Thanks george

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