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HomeRC & PowerAircraftHelicopterEngines Plugs Mufflers Fuel › How long do nitro engines last?
10-14-2011 01:59 AM  7 years agoPost 1
ckombo

rrApprentice

Boston, MA USA

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So i think i may have burnt out my engine, but not quite sure until i take it apart...

Ive been flying on it for 2 years, with a few instances where it ran too lean. Does that seem like normal "mileage" or should these engines last a lot longer?

When i take it apart, what should i look for?

When i ran the engine last it literally had no power and unresponsive to throttle imput....

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10-14-2011 02:12 AM  7 years agoPost 2
airdodger

rrElite Veteran

Johnston USA

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How long they last is directly related to how well they are treated. One lean run you take a lot of good miles away. I have seen engines wear the liner down to brass when it started to lose power. The rear bearing is always a good place to look first. Post clear pics when you take it apart someone will answer about what is in need of replacement.

Chris

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10-14-2011 03:04 AM  7 years agoPost 3
JasonJ

rrKey Veteran

North Idaho

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The good thing about these engines is they are not super expensive to refurbish. New bearings, sleeve and ring bring it right back to like new status.

As far as your question, the #1 killer of these engines are lean runs. Lean runs occur because people come onto internet forums and for some insane reason walk away from that internet session thinking they need to lean the living crap out of their engine for that awesome max power but they don't fly in a way that even remotely needs that kind of power in the first place. Run a bit on the rich side and you will get many many trouble free flights.

Also, if you run 30%, you can run a bit rich and still have more than enough power. If you run 15% you come closer to a lean run because 15% has a much narrower window of running well and being too rich/lean, you really have to watch your tune with 15%. 20% is a great compromise if you are sport flying.

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10-14-2011 03:25 AM  7 years agoPost 4
MANCHA

rrVeteran

Cabo San Lucas, Baja- Mexico

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Two years is a good run !
I go to the field a good 60 times a year, fly an average of 6 flights per session.

There are 2 helis that get to go most of the time and they fly 2 to times per session on the average.

That will be about 100 flights a year and my engines last about a year !

I have red on flyers putting as much as 300 flights on an engine however, it depends on where you fly, on top of, how you take care of them.

I fly sea level, dry salty lake and one year is good enough for me, on those ships.

My competition helis fly 3 months out of the year only and engines last 3 years so far, ball bearings died first though !

As JasonJ said, parts are not that expensive when changes are done in time..

MANCHA

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10-14-2011 09:54 PM  7 years agoPost 5
w.pasman

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Netherlands

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I think in the order of 100 hours

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10-14-2011 09:56 PM  7 years agoPost 6
w.pasman

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Netherlands

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and for your question:

>When i take it apart, what should i look for?

Look for play, any metal particles, check that the bearing is 100% smooth (after getting out the oil from the bearing), check for wear in the liner, check that piston ring fits still tight; check that cylinder head has no dents or bends

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10-14-2011 10:12 PM  7 years agoPost 7
Richardmid1

rrProfessor

Leeds, England

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Replace the bearings and piston ring (assuming it has been treated well) and it will carry on going. Good fuel helps.

60% of the time, it works every time!

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10-14-2011 10:30 PM  7 years agoPost 8
BladeStrikes

rrElite Veteran

Shelby TWP,Mi

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+1 on what Richardmid1 said..

I get around 300 to 400 flight's on my motor's then change the ring/rear bearing..Just make sure the sleeve/liner doesn't have bad scratches..

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10-15-2011 09:37 PM  7 years agoPost 9
helixangle

rrKey Veteran

Mamaroneck, NY - USA

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Had around 900 flights on a YS91SR before I had to do PRS and bearing

Be sure the juice is worth the sqweeze
Remember life is hard...even harder for stupid people

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10-16-2011 11:05 PM  7 years agoPost 10
Jeff polisena

rrElite Veteran

westpalmbeachflorida usa

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I can't remember the date but when OS 91HZ was released I got one and still have it and have yet to rebuild .I don't run headspeed over 1910 and used powermaster 30%.In the past I used cool power 30% in other motors and replaced bearings .I feel there is many variables that will change every situation .

I stole it ,flew it and gave it back ;)

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10-17-2011 01:04 AM  7 years agoPost 11
carcrasher

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east coast

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Depends really on how well they are tuned so they don't run lean. Do you run the fuel out of it and ETC. Also do you fly in dusty conditions? Do you store it in humid conditions after flying for the season? The only times I had to rebuild an engine was when others tuned my engine and it would lean and that was the end of it.

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10-17-2011 02:34 AM  7 years agoPost 12
Zaneman007

rrElite Veteran

Texas - USA

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Experience = longer life
When I first started in this hobby, my engines OS50, didn't last long. A season at best.

Now they last for quite awhile. So to resolve the issue, I go out and buy a YS56 with three needles. Hopefully, I'll figure out how to tune this baby before the engine losses faith in me.

Old Guys Rule!

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10-17-2011 02:46 AM  7 years agoPost 13
Santiago P

rrProfessor

South West, Ohio

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I have an OS50 hyper that is 5 seasons old. New rear bearing every year, and one piston/ring replacement two years ago after one really, really lean run. Still strong as heck.

I have several plank engines over 20 seasons old, changed bearings once.
Is all relative to the care you give to any engine.

Santiago

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10-18-2011 02:49 AM  7 years agoPost 14
Deltaoverride

rrApprentice

Beaverton, OR

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I put over 80 Gallons threw my last motor. I was replacing the rear bearing every 10 gallons and ring every 20 gallons. If you are a stick bangger I would highly recommend changing that rear bearing every 10 gallons.

With that being said like the other guys mentioned its all about how you take care of it.

Angry Timmay
West Side Heli
Tammies Hobbies
YS Engines
KDE Direct

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10-18-2011 05:20 AM  7 years agoPost 15
dkshema

rrMaster

Cedar Rapids, IA

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Gee, maybe it's time I rebuilt the Supertiger Blue Head 60 I bought something like 35 years ago...ran great last time I flew it in a Kaos about 5 years back.

Treat 'em right, they are like Tootsie Rolls, they last a long time.

-----
Dave

* Making the World Better -- One Helicopter at a time! *

Team Heliproz

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10-20-2011 05:50 PM  7 years agoPost 16
nbit

rrNovice

Houston, TX - USA

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I used to buy CP30 in a 55 gallon drum once a year. I had an YS61ST that I did 90% of my flying with in an Ergo 60 Sport for those three years. I entered that in the IRCHA drag races the third year it was used and got fourth place. I never replaced the PRS, only the rear bearing in the three years. Finally the hover needle seat wore out and I couldn't lean the mixture enough for hovering. Figure that engine had well over a hundred gallons through it before it needed work to fix any issue. I took it out of storage a couple of months ago, replaced the rear bearing, and it runs great, still with the original piston and sleeve. (Would this be a good big block upgrade for a 600N? Hmmm.) Engine is well over ten years old, I guess.

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10-22-2011 03:16 AM  7 years agoPost 17
ckombo

rrApprentice

Boston, MA USA

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OK here are pics of my engine.
DO you guys see anything wrong? Does it look normal?

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10-22-2011 03:47 AM  7 years agoPost 18
dkshema

rrMaster

Cedar Rapids, IA

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The pictures really don't say much, except, what happened to the bottom end of the con rod? It doesn't look round, instead it looks like it's been deformed and hammered flat.

I see a little rust, nothing uncommon, though. Either the exhaust manifold lighting is poor in the first pic, or that part of the motor is covered in black goo, indicating more than an occasional lean run.

You should bite the bullet, and dismantle it completely so you can inspect for damage -- scored piston skirt, scored cylinder, broken or stuck ring, etc. And find out what happened to the bottom end of the con rod.

New rod looks like this:

Nice and round on the bottom. Yours seems flattened a bit. Look at the groove in the rear of the crankcase the provides clearance for the bottom end of the rod as it goes round and round, looking for evidence of the rod slapping against the crankcase. If you see marks in that groove, it's time you put in a new rear bearing before it lets go completely and trashes the motor.

Note that the bottom end is on the left in the picture...if you look real close at the bronze bushing, you'll see that it is chamfered. This is the FRONT of the rod, the side that goes toward the crank web when you reassemble. Small detail, but important as that slight chamfer provides necessary clearance for the radius that's present between the crank web and the con rod journal.

-----

By the way, to answer your original question -- "how long do nitro engines last", the answer can be many years or one lean run, whichever comes first.

-----
Dave

* Making the World Better -- One Helicopter at a time! *

Team Heliproz

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10-23-2011 04:42 PM  7 years agoPost 19
SkateFreak

rrElite Veteran

Cambs UK

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Hey,
I think you will find that is normal, its not the con rod thats deformed but the conrod runs through a grove and its the lip of that grove that is making it look like the conrod has been damaged.

On topic, an engine will last forever if you treat it right and replace the consumables (if that is, you consider bearings, piston, rings etc consumables heh).

Two years is not bad atall but be careful, a couple of bearings, piston and a set of piston rings could set you back nearly the cost of a whole new engine so keep a close eye on how much it comes to as it may well be worth getting another engine and either selling on the crank case etc or keeping them for spares.

That being sad, both bearings can be had for pittance from a bearing shop so that may help keep the price down.

Best regards

-Jvr

Non-3D heli pilots are planker spys trying to bring down the heli community from the inside - Topher

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10-25-2011 05:31 AM  7 years agoPost 20
dkshema

rrMaster

Cedar Rapids, IA

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The arrow points to the bottom of the con rod, it sure looks flattened out, not nice and round. The portion of the rod that's under the lip of the crankcase groove is about 100 degrees clockwise from the arrow...

I'd venture a guess that at about the 5 o'clock position in that same groove (12 o'clock being straight up), there are some marks inside the groove where that flattened portion of the rod bottom has been whacking the crankcase on the downward side of the power stroke.

Replace the rear bearing, and see how much of its gone up through the piston and cylinder. Probably some good score marks on the piston skirt and ring lands.

-----
Dave

* Making the World Better -- One Helicopter at a time! *

Team Heliproz

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HomeRC & PowerAircraftHelicopterEngines Plugs Mufflers Fuel › How long do nitro engines last?
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