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10-13-2011 02:06 PM  6 years agoPost 1
red_z06

rrProfessor

Dumont, NJ

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Does anyone know what the helium cost will be to keep this thing inflated?

Watch at YouTube

How often do you expect to refill?

Helium is running out.

http://gizmodo.com/5618561/the-worl...tually-cost-100

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10-13-2011 03:49 PM  6 years agoPost 2
jfint

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Simi Valley, CA

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we have about 10 of those here at work, cost people between $0.50 and $1.50 depending on how they flirted with the party store lady.

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10-13-2011 03:50 PM  6 years agoPost 3
red_z06

rrProfessor

Dumont, NJ

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That is not so bad. How long does it stay inflated?

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10-13-2011 03:58 PM  6 years agoPost 4
Justin Stuart (RIP)

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Plano, Texas

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That's so cool.

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10-13-2011 04:01 PM  6 years agoPost 5
Justin Stuart (RIP)

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Plano, Texas

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It is my understanding that helium comes from naturally occurring radioactive alpha decay in the earth's core. The helium atoms get trapped at the top of natural gas reserves.

It seems to me they could make a breeder reactor to produce helium. I don't know why this is not possible?

I believe a major use of helium is in MRI machines since the 4C temperature is necessary to keep the superconducting magnets in the correct state.

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10-13-2011 04:59 PM  6 years agoPost 6
red_z06

rrProfessor

Dumont, NJ

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Here is some interesting reading.
WASHINGTON — Trapped within a subterranean expanse of rock near Amarillo, Texas, is the world’s largest supply of helium, the Federal Helium Reserve.

The US government is on track to sell the last of this stockpile within five years and let the private sector control the market.

But some scientists fear that within a few decades, there may not be any helium to control. They say we are close to running out of the second most common element in the universe. (In our solar system, most helium is inside the sun.)

At the current rate of usage, “the world would run out in 25 years, plus or minus five years,’’ Robert Richardson, a Cornell University physicist who won a Nobel Prize in 1996 for his work with superfluid helium, told a gathering of Nobel laureates in August. This is troubling news for anyone who uses helium, and that’s not just stores selling party balloons.

Anyone getting an MRI depends on helium. The extremely stable, supercooling properties of the gas maintain the scanning machines’ superconductive magnets. MRI machines account for more than a quarter of the helium used in the United States; it is also widely used in welding and provides the inert atmosphere necessary to manufacture optical fibers and liquid crystal display (LCD) screens.

Helium is used to pressurize and purge the fuel tanks in NASA’s rockets. It prevents the particle accelerators at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois and the Large Hadron Collider at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN from overheating.

“Helium is central to half of my ongoing research and the dissertation work of several students,’’ said Daniel Lathrop, a University of Maryland physics professor.

The earth’s retrievable sources of helium were created over millenniums by the radioactive decay of rock, and it is often extracted from natural gas. The most productive reserves are in the United States, which also consumes about half the helium used worldwide.

In the past few years, Algeria, Qatar, and Russia have created helium processing facilities. According to the US Geological Survey, Poland, Canada, and China also have natural gas fields that could produce helium.

But the Federal Helium Reserve is the only known place on the planet with the kind of rock formation that can store helium. In addition, the helium naturally occurring there is found at an unusually high concentration — it makes up about 2 percent of the reserve’s natural gas, compared with less than 0.3 percent in most gas fields.

Richardson, who in 2009 cochaired a National Research Council committee on the sale of the helium reserve, has repeatedly warned that the United States is squandering its control of this unique, nonrenewable resource.

“We will have no helium,’’ he said in an interview, “and we will have to rely on Russia and Qatar and Algeria.’’

Helium was first seen as a strategic resource in the early years of the 20th century, when lighter-than-air dirigibles seemed to have military potential. The Federal Helium Program was established in 1925; in 1960, the reserve was created under the control of the Bureau of Mines, which closed in the mid-1990s. The Bureau of Land Management then assumed control of US helium operations.

The government site occupies 11,000 acres on the edge of the Hugoton-Panhandle Gas Field, a portion of Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas where helium and other gases permeate a layer of porous brown dolomite rock.

After the Cold War ended, the expected global demand for helium did not materialize, and in 1996, a Congress eager to pare federal spending passed the Helium Privatization Act, requiring the BLM to stop refining helium by 1998 and sell off the reserve by Jan. 1, 2015.

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10-13-2011 05:42 PM  6 years agoPost 7
Justin Stuart (RIP)

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Plano, Texas

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It seems logical to me that anywhere you have a thick rock formation, you should have helium trapped underneath it. How can that one field in Texas be the only place to get it from? But just like everything else, its going to get more expensive. What I don't understand is why they can't make it. An alpha particle is a helium nucleus. And electrons are not that hard to come by. Don't we have a bunch of low level nuclear waste sitting in cooling pools near every nuclear reactor?

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10-13-2011 06:41 PM  6 years agoPost 8
red_z06

rrProfessor

Dumont, NJ

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Helium can be made. So is gold. But, the cost of gold is much much much cheaper than artificially making them so no one is (Yet) in practical quantities.
Helium is made either by the nuclear fusion process of the Sun, or by the slow and steady radioactive decay of terrestrial rock(in other words, over millions of years), which accounts for all of the Earth's store of the gas. There is no way of manufacturing it artificially, and practically all of the world's reserves have been derived as a by-product from the extraction of natural gas, mostly in the giant oil- and gasfields of the American South-west, which historically have had the highest helium concentrations.

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10-13-2011 07:55 PM  6 years agoPost 9
Justin Stuart (RIP)

rrMaster

Plano, Texas

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I guess I just don't understand why alpha decay which is so common cannot be used synthetically to produce elemental helium. Perhaps the helium 2+ nuclei which are released through alpha decay from radioactive fission byproducts exit so fast that they cannot be captured.

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10-14-2011 04:40 AM  6 years agoPost 10
dkshema

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Cedar Rapids, IA

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Go green. Build yourself an electrolysis system to generate hydrogen from water. Fill your fish with hydrogen instead. But keep it away from spark and open flame.

Perhaps you can get some of the left-over Solyndra loan money to install that green hydrogen generating plant in your house...

-----
Dave

* Making the World Better -- One Helicopter at a time! *

Team Heliproz

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10-14-2011 04:47 AM  6 years agoPost 11
Justin Stuart (RIP)

rrMaster

Plano, Texas

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Hydrogen balloons. Safe for all ages.

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10-14-2011 03:18 PM  6 years agoPost 12
red_z06

rrProfessor

Dumont, NJ

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Unfortunately, some people in Korea have been doing exactly that to save on the cost of filling. They have used huge nylon fabric balloons filled with hydrogen. The worst part is that the nylon melts as it explodes and sticks to wherever it lands and continue to burn.

Sadly, these were balloon dolls at children's events and some kids got permanently disfigured.

It is much like the polyester shirts from the 70' Imagine that catching fire and starts to melt and stick to your skin?

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10-14-2011 08:07 PM  6 years agoPost 13
Justin Stuart (RIP)

rrMaster

Plano, Texas

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Like napalm. Terrible.

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10-14-2011 08:22 PM  6 years agoPost 14
red_z06

rrProfessor

Dumont, NJ

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Apparently, China also uses hydrogen filled balloons.

In Korean.
http://www.pgr21.com/zboard4/zboard...sc=asc&no=42534

1500 baloons waiting to be distributed to kids in a school event blew up all at the same time, requiring 70 people to be hospitalized.

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10-14-2011 11:58 PM  6 years agoPost 15
03fomoco

rrApprentice

Tucson AZ

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Long term
If you gonna play with the thing long term buy a welding tank or if you know someone who does a lot of welding hit them up. Welding stores dont care which inert gas cyclinder you exchange so if you got a friend tell him to swap a mix gas or an argon tank for helium next time. About 30-35 bucks and come at 1800 psi, you could fill about 100-150 of those fish from empty. lol.

I got an old regulator that I rigged up with a blow off nozzle that I keep laying around for all the kids Bday parties. It never fails someone will ask my wife "wow how much did you guys spend to fill 200 ballons". The kids love it though and people are dumb enough to think we paid 75 cents a piece or more. What a rip.

As a side note fill a few baloons with Argon which is quiet a bit heavier than ambient air (25%) and that will confuse a few people to see a baloon fall so fast, just unexpected. Just dont let some idiot inhale it as it wont leave the lungs... Darwin will take over.

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10-26-2011 08:23 PM  6 years agoPost 16
haha

rrApprentice

Woodstock,GA

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where can i get one of those?

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10-27-2011 12:59 PM  6 years agoPost 17
miker

rrApprentice

north port fl

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haha..toys r us had them on sale for 37 bucks that was a coulpe of weeks ago bought two for the kids

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