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HomeAircraftHelicopterBeginners Corner › I Really Want A T-Rex 250
04-24-2011 11:04 PM  7 years agoPost 1
Iainhol

rrNovice

Saratoga Springs, NY

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I learned to fly RC airplanes about 10 years ago, I have some experience with helicopters but I would still say I am a beginner though. I am getting back in helicopters and everyone is saying get a larger helicopter but I want a T-Rex 250.

I understand it is not the ideal trainer and I fully expect it crash it a few times but I live about an hour away from the closest flying field which heli guys regular fly at. Considering I live in the NE, I will be able to fly summers only and about once a week. That probably means I will be going to the flying field 26 times a year.

If I got a T-Rex 250, I am sure the guys at the club will help me set it up but I could fly multiple times a day in my backyard during the summer and during the winter I could fly in our indoor archery range.

I know some of you will say to get a larger heli for the summer and then a T-Rex 250 for the winter, however right now I am not looking to get overloaded with helicopters. I am sure a larger one will follow, however until I have learned and mastered the basics I think 1 ship is plenty.

I am not looking for the 250 to be my introduction to 3D, but just get me in the air. Is my rational between 600+ flights per year and 26 a good reason to not follow the ideal.

What are your thoughts?

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04-25-2011 01:06 AM  7 years agoPost 2
wrongler

rrProfessor

Brewerton, New York

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Stick time is the only way to learn, either a flight sim or a 250, I started the same way, with the 250 in my yard, lots of crashes and repairs, but with the 250 is wasnt expensive. Its a very twitchy bird, but if you can fly the 250, The bigger birds will seem easy. Spend as much time as you can on the flight sim. Good luck to you, and have fun.
Bill.

Bill Whittaker

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04-25-2011 01:31 AM  7 years agoPost 3
Gamb

rrApprentice

Belle Mead, NJ USA

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If I got a T-Rex 250 ... I could fly multiple times a day in my backyard during the summer and during the winter I could fly in our indoor archery range.
The T-Rex 250 is a very nice looking machine, and looks great when flown well. I don't have, nor have I flown a T-Rex 250, but those who do, say it is very squirreley, and when you do have to work on it, the parts are very small and hard to handle. My heli's start from a Blade 400 and go up. If you have a back yard where you can fly a 250, you could fly a 400 - 450 size machine just as well, especially since it would be your "starter" heli. I chose my heli's for the same reason. When I get home from work, I just grab my gear, go out in the back and do some hovering, etc. Not doing any 3D stuff, so it is not a problem. I went electric to avoid complaints about the noise from the neighbors. The Blade 400 that way has served me well. The only thing is you need a smooth and flat surface for take off (which would be true for the T-Rex 250 as well). Depending on the size of your "archery range", you should still be able to fly the Blade 400 (T-Rex 450, etc.) in an indoor space. You will not regret getting a larger heli, and find that you will tend to move up in size, not down. When you get really good at 3D the T-Rex 250 would be a great platform to show off your talents in a limited space!
Is my rational between 600+ flights per year and 26 a good reason to not follow the ideal.
Wow! Doing the math, 26 flying sessions, 600 flights = 23 flights per session. Assuming an average of 8 - 10 minutes per flight (not counting down time) this would equal 3.8 hours of flying per session! You would need a lot of battery packs ready to go! I wish I had time to get 600 flights per year!! This weekend it rained on Saturday - no flying. Sunday was sunny, but ground soggy - but flew anyway. Three helicopters, two sets of batteries each; had to do some blade tracking on one, contend with ESC overheating on the blade 400, etc. so altogether about 30 minutes of flying. Then it started raining again! Happy flying!

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04-25-2011 01:58 AM  7 years agoPost 4
Iainhol

rrNovice

Saratoga Springs, NY

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My 600 flights would be with a heli I can fly in my yard - the 26 flights would be if I needed to commute to the field.

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04-25-2011 02:28 PM  7 years agoPost 5
helismash

rrKey Veteran

Gloversville, NY - Fulton

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Squirley little heli. Parts are cheaper than the bigger heli's but bigger is more stable and will take the wind a little better. If you really want to get into something smaller, I would think a 450 size would be better than a 250 size heli.
Another option could be a Raptor 30, they are around on the groups for sale and are pretty inexpensive and even more stable.

Hey, Who put the ground there!
T-Rex 500/T-Rex 600N FBL/T-Rex 600E PRO/T-Rex 700N/T-Rex 700FBL

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04-25-2011 03:14 PM  7 years agoPost 6
BeltFedBrowning

rrKey Veteran

Kansas City

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I actually do own and fly a 250 and a 450. I don't see much difference in the way the 250 flies and the way the 450 flies. The 250 just needs a lot less room. Don't hesitate to get the 250 for practice, I love mine!

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04-25-2011 10:57 PM  7 years agoPost 7
Fnity

rrKey Veteran

Socal - Lafayette, IN

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Go for it!

The 250 is a great backyard/park heli.

Yes its a bit touchy and you need to be a little quicker than the larger machines, but that alone will make you a better pilot

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04-25-2011 11:03 PM  7 years agoPost 8
Justin Stuart (RIP)

rrMaster

Plano, Texas

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My Trex 250 is MUCH more difficult to fly than my 450, and as a result seems to require almost the same amount of room due to the need for corrections. Not only that, but parts on the 250 are not exactly cheap.

FWIW, I think the 450 with wood blades is a great learning helicopter.

Avant RC
Scorpion Power Systems
Thunder Power RC
Kontronik Drives

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04-25-2011 11:36 PM  7 years agoPost 9
Mike Fortin

rrElite Veteran

USA

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Your much better off getting a larger heli to learn on, I'd say a 500 size at the very least. the larger size will handle wind better and most importantly be easier to see.

Plus, for almost the price of a 250 Super Combo you can get a new Trex 500E with everything except RX and Battery.

The smaller the helicopter the harder it is to learn.

Have Rotors, Will Fly!

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04-26-2011 10:45 AM  7 years agoPost 10
OH-6 Cayuse

rrVeteran

san antonio tx, USA.

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I have a 250 and to tell you the truthits so awesome!!! I love that lil heli, once you set it up good its a joy to fly and if you learn with this one. The larger helis will be nothing!!! Mine comes with me everywhere I go and honestly it's so convenient as I just take it out and start flying anywhere! Get yourself a 250 you'll love it!!

!!For some people the sky is the limit, for me it's home!!

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04-29-2011 04:53 AM  7 years agoPost 11
Newbe Guy

rrNovice

Phoenix, AZ

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Damn, now Im starting to think anout a 250! lol.

Blade mSR / Trex 450se V2 - AMA#965156

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04-29-2011 11:19 PM  7 years agoPost 12
RC Dbutz

rrApprentice

Newman Lake, WA

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Just keep in mind that if you get a 250, you will run the risk of chasing down some serious tail wag. I had 2, the first one I had held solid right away, the second one I had was a PITA. To finally get the wag acceptable I put a CF pushrod on it, metal tail pitch arm, and a flippin' mini sized digital servo. Tried to use a few microheli products and those ended up being a complete waste of $$.

CITIZEN#005 - MD Helicopters, Xpert Servos, Scorpion Power, OptiPower

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04-30-2011 01:03 PM  7 years agoPost 13
JOLT

rrVeteran

Baltimore, MD

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I don't think it is a good first helicopter for these reasons:

Really small
Really fast
Becomes really small really fast

But everyone is different as far as how they progress. I am a very conservative flyer and take my time getting into a new maneuver. I have had a 250. It's pretty cool, but intended for the experienced flyer.

If you really want one, get it and put together a build log and flight journal. That way you can either prove the consensus right or wrong for the sake of future pilots who have trouble making the decision.

This has been asked many times by new hobbyists. The thought is: it's compact and inexpensive so it must be perfect for a newbie. The same logic was applied to and marketed by Eflite in the Blade CP series helicopters--what a disaster for the unsuspecting LHS shopper!!--and Eflite knew exactly what they were doing with their disposable birds.

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04-30-2011 05:00 PM  7 years agoPost 14
MpVpRb

rrNovice

Burbank, CA

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I started with a 250. It was really hard for me as a beginner.

Hard to fly, and hard to build. Working with those tiny parts made me feel like a watchmaker.

Switched to a 600..much better!

You can probably practice hovering in a backyard. Forward flight and circuits are another thing. Beginners tend to go wide and far until they develop good control.

An expert can do tight figure 8s in a backyard, but a beginner probably can't.

I used to practice in a baseball field surrounded by mountains. Even though it was plenty big, it felt really small, and I was constantly concerned with going too far out.

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05-01-2011 01:04 PM  7 years agoPost 15
mrford

rrApprentice

elmwood park nj usa

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do you really want a 250
I learned on a 450 thats all their was 12 years ago I am no grate flyer a flying buddy said try my 600 e so I just took off and hovered the difference was incredible needless to say there was a used t rex 600 that folioed me home .If you go 250 you will be going the other way it will make you a grate pilot or frustrate you to stop flying . I am not an aggressive flyer I fly to relax my head its a mini vacation .But every one is different as long as you have the correct information and make an educated pick you may love it I fly a T rex gasser conversion and love it

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05-04-2011 09:54 PM  7 years agoPost 16
swoop_g

rrApprentice

Lake Charles, LA USA

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I got a 250 as my second heli and I do love that little bird. As a first heli, I don't know. It can be done no doubt and it is cheap to fly all things considered. I say if you want it, get it. I had about a month or two experience on a 450 before I got my 250 and now I rarely fly my 450! It is just too slow and cumbersome, really. I love the way the 250 darts here and there. It is so nimble, like a hummingbird. The piro speed with a spartan quark is crazy, probably like 3 turns per second, seriously. You can't keep up with it when you have it pegged. It is a little hard to fly cause of its twitchiness but once you get used to it you will love it, I know I love mine.

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05-09-2011 03:57 AM  7 years agoPost 17
Stephen Born

rrElite Veteran

USA

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Squirley 250... be careful.

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05-09-2011 05:14 AM  7 years agoPost 18
Heli Ace X

rrApprentice

Crystal Lake, IL

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If you want a 250 just get the microheli vortex. That is a little beast.

Whats life without a lil danger

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05-09-2011 06:05 AM  7 years agoPost 19
Wingspinner99

rrNovice

Dallas, tx

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The t250 is a great little ship. That said, it is by no means a beginners ship. I have three of them in various configurations and by far the most enjoyable is the one I have a Skookum sk720 in. Because my yard is small I fly it with 50% self leveling turned on and it's absolutely non-twitchy and very, vey stable. It's pretty awesome actually. You must widen the frames out slightly to fit an SK720 but it's not difficult and it's the best upgrade you can possibly do because od the sk720s self leveling and bail-out modes. Saves a lot of crashes while learning and even after you are good. The sk720 is double what a BeastX is new but about the same as Vbar used and the self leveling / bailout capability will pay for it after two or three avoided crashes. If you really want a t250 the absolutely put a sk720 in it.

That said, I recommend a t450. Only a little more expensive but much larger and not nearly as e pensive as 500 on up.

If you often have calm conditions get a mcpx. Great little machine. Very stable and very inexpensive but absolutely requires calm conditions or indoors.

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05-10-2011 03:01 PM  7 years agoPost 20
pigs dont fly

rrKey Veteran

City, State - Country

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snip...."If you often have calm conditions get a mcpx. Great little machine. Very stable and very inexpensive but absolutely requires calm conditions or indoor"

....lol sorry but thats completely untrue. It flys in the wind like a champ.

Warning...This hobby is very addictive and may damage your wealth

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