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Home✈️Aircraft🚁HelicopterAerial Photography and Video › Deshaker users. Critique please.
12-21-2010 12:24 AM  9 years ago
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webdr

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Atlanta GA

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Deshaker users. Critique please.
Im new to Deshaker, and I ahve a question about some footage.
This is from a glider thats moving about in 12-15mph wind. The deshaker took alot of the jitters out but there is this weird movement in the middle of the screen from time to time.
Any advice?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3-IjQSUiUAQ
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12-21-2010 02:30 AM  9 years ago
Wayne Mann

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That looks like video from a GoPro HD camera. Do you notice how the horizon is very curved at the top of the screen...that is because the lens on those things really suck as they have a ton of distortion. This distortion drives Deshaker or Smoothcam nuts. The same thing happens on DSLR wide angle lenses also if the lens has much distortion at the wide end.

I hope this helps.

Wayne Mann
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12-21-2010 03:11 AM  9 years ago
webdr

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Atlanta GA

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Its a Contour HD, but yea, same distortion. thanks for clarifying that. So that liquid movement in the center of the frame will go away with a less wide angle clip?
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12-21-2010 04:14 AM  9 years ago
Wayne Mann

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Basically yes. You need a lens or focal length that doesn't distort the picture. If you can hold the camera and look at the horizon with the horizon near the top or the bottom of the frame (this assumes that you are looking at a relatively level horizon...no mountains) and the horizon is still level Deshaker should be able to handle that without causing the video to look like jello.

Wayne Mann
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12-21-2010 04:44 PM  9 years ago
onlocation

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Wyoming

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You also may try using the rolling shutter correction built into Deshaker. You have to turn it on and set it for both pass 1 and pass 2.
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12-21-2010 05:57 PM  9 years ago
comet

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Neuilly sur Seine, Fr

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true
for cmos sensors, enter a rolling shutter value
nonetheless, great video
VT "slow&low"
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12-21-2010 05:58 PM  9 years ago
webdr

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Atlanta GA

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thanks guys, Ill add a value to the cmos section.
matt
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12-21-2010 07:39 PM  9 years ago
comet

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this is from http://www.guthspot.se/video/deshaker.htm

Camcorder has a rolling shutter:

Most modern camcorders (those with a CMOS sensor instead of a CCD sensor) don't capture the whole frames at once, but instead use a "rolling shutter". Here the lines of a frame are captured one after another at slightly different (although usually overlapping) times, which can cause some ugly effects. For example, vertical lines will get slanted when doing a fast horizontal pan, and when panning up/down everything will get squeezed and stretched.
For Deshaker, a rolling shutter means that the camcorder shake parameters (panning, rotation and zoom) aren't necessarily constant over the entire frame, but can change slightly from one line to the next. If you enable this setting, Deshaker will therefore allow these parameters to change linearly in the vertical direction during pass 1 (and you will see a range of values under the output video). This makes extracting these parameters more reliable and it also makes it possible for pass 2 to remove the rolling shutter distortions if you keep the setting enabled during that pass too. Although the actual camcorder shake isn't linear during the capture of a frame, it's usually a good enough approximation to make the distortions disappear almost completely. But I still strongly recommend using the internal camcorder stabilizer too.

If you have one of those compact CMOS cameras with bad (or no) internal stabilization, and the clip has very fast shakes (for example if the camera is mounted on a bike or similar), you probably won't be able to get a very good result from Deshaker, since the distortions will be far from linear in this case. Get a CCD camera capable of high shutter speeds for these kind of videos.

Different camcorder models may have different rolling shutter speeds (how fast the shutter rolls downwards). And a certain model could possibly even have different speeds under different conditions. To be able to handle all speeds properly, you can enter an amount from 0 to 100%. You can try which amount setting looks best, or you can measure it more precisely yourself using the following procedure:

Put the camcorder on a tripod (or something flat) and point it towards some vertical line (or bar) that covers the whole height of the frame. Now, using a fast shutter speed (to make the line sharp), record some video where you pan left and right (direction doesn't matter) at a pretty fast constant speed, as well as when it's completely still. Then, pick a still frame and a panning frame (where the vertical line is slanted). If you recorded interlaced video, the panning frame will contain two fields (and the line will appear twice), which is what you need. If you recorded progressive video, you'll need two consecutive frames instead. Then, find the horizontal position (x-pos) of the vertical line at 5 places, namely at St = top of still frame, Sb = bottom of still frame, Ft = top of first panning field/frame, Fb = bottom of first panning field/frame, Nt = top of next panning field/frame. Now, the rolling shutter amount should be calculated as: 100 * (Fb - Ft + St - Sb) / (Nt - Ft).

The default rolling shutter amount is 88%, which was measured from the Sony HDR-HC1(E) camcorder. (Deshaker versions before 2.4 had 88% fixed.)
If you measure the amount for another camcorder, please let me know so I can publish the values for other users. Here are the ones I've got so far:

Canon EOS 500D: 71%
Canon EOS 550D: 66%
Canon EOS 5D Mark II: Probably somewhere between 66% - 72%
Canon HV20, at 1440x1080 25p: 38%
Canon LEGRIA HF M36, at 1920x1080 50i: 82%
Casio Exilim EX-F1 Pro, at 1280x720 30fps: 22%
Casio Exilim EX-F1 Pro, at 1920x1080 60fps: 72%
Casio Exilim FH-100, at 1280x720 30fps: 33%
Drift Innovation HD170, 1080p: 60%
HD Hero, at 1280x720 60fps: 82%
iPhone 4: 97% (+/- 2)
(Note: Deshaker assumes that the rolling shutter rolls downwards over the frames. For this to happen, the iPhone must record video in landscape mode with the lens in the upper part of the phone. Otherwise you'll probably need to rotate the video before Deshaker, and rotate it back afterwards.)
Kodak Zi8: Somewhere between 80% - 100%
Oregon Scientific ATC5K: 100%
Panasonic GH1, at 1080p 24fps: 66%
Panasonic HDC-SD300 EG-K: 73%
Pentax K7, at 1536x1024 30fps: 75%
Sanyo Xacti HD1010, at 1280x720 60fps: 48%
Sanyo Xacti HD1010, at 1920x1080 30fps: 28%
Sony HDR-FX7: 86.4% (+/- 2.0)
Sony HDR-HC1: 88%
Sony HDR-HC1E: 88%
Sony HDR-V1U: 86.4% (+/- 2.0)
Sony HVR-A1E: 82%

Note that only rolling shutter distortions that are caused by moving/shaking the camcorder can be removed. Fast moving objects within the frame will sadly still look as strange as before.

and the contour HD is with a cmos sensor
the advantage of cmos is that they require less energy to function well
and they can also vary sensivity inside a same picture, for sky and ground for example.
VT "slow&low"
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