RunRyder RC
WATCH
 8 pages [ <<    <    ( 1 )     2      3     NEXT    >> ] 12794 views TOPIC CLOSED
HomeAircraftHelicopterSafety - RC Helis are not toys › Telling newbies to go big
04-09-2010 12:59 AM  8 years agoPost 1
Solmanbandit

rrElite Veteran

Tucson , AZ

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

I seem to see it a lot where people tell the newbies to go big. "Bigger is better and more stable" is what I hear. Well lets think about this for a second. There are those who are basically telling new people with none or little experience to go buy the biggest flying guillotine you can get.
Yes I can An experienced pilot in texas was trimming a someone else heli after doing as such he gave back transmitter to said pilot, said pilot lost control and took his chopper right into the throat of the experienced pilot
Would you tell someone who has never ridden before go buy a GSXR1000 sport bike? I sure hope not! But time and time I again, I see people telling newbies to go big. As many times as I have crashed of of three things would've happened. 1. In the poor house because of buying parts. 2. Killing or injuring myself 3. Killing or injuring someone else.

Trex 700E / Trex 500 ESP - Ikon/ HD 500 - Ikon 2/ Goblin 500 Ikon 2

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR
04-09-2010 01:19 AM  8 years agoPost 2
HeliFisher

rrVeteran

Verdi , Nevadafornia

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

+1^^^^^^^
IMO, I think the 425mm blade helis are probably a good place to start. Fairly stable helis at that size, and not over the top on crash costs.

The less a man makes a clarative statement, the less likely he is to look like a fool in retrospect.

PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR
04-09-2010 01:23 AM  8 years agoPost 3
Solmanbandit

rrElite Veteran

Tucson , AZ

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

425 or 325mm? A 450 comes with 325 mm blades.

Trex 700E / Trex 500 ESP - Ikon/ HD 500 - Ikon 2/ Goblin 500 Ikon 2

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR
04-09-2010 01:27 AM  8 years agoPost 4
rcmiket

rrVeteran

El Paso,Texas

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

You can get hurt just as bad with a 450 as you can with a 500.. Most won't recommend anything over a 500 to a beginner. The 500 size is just easier for the newbie to learn on and about the same cost.
Mike

"When Inverted down is up and up is expensive"

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR
04-09-2010 01:32 AM  8 years agoPost 5
Frank Bostwick

rrElite Veteran

Cincinnati Ohio

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Cant say on the 425s and to be honest if I had it to do over, Ida started on a 50 or an electric swinging 550s. As it is I started on a Hawk with an OS37 swinging 550s. It is a very stable Heli and not as intimidating as a 50 or a high head speed 500 bladed 6s set up.
You get up in the 550s and there is a very noticeable stability gain with the added rotor span.

I see the biggest problems with a new guys, and I did the same thing, as; trying to fly in the wrong places, starting without adequate knowledge, flying alone, and as a result flying with a poorly set up heli.

If those problems are "a given" as in its going to keep happening, the the smaller helis are best to start on. If those common problems can be over come; flying at a field, good basic understanding of the machine, starting out with experienced help and flying a properly set up heli, then I say the bigger the better.

RIP ROMAN

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR
04-09-2010 02:06 AM  8 years agoPost 6
Flying Brian

rrElite Veteran

St. Clairsville, Ohio

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Those CY 430mm radixs blades scare the hell out of me when they are spinning 2800 hundred mph.........But I fly them anyways.

"I just don't Listen" "

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR
04-09-2010 02:44 AM  8 years agoPost 7
philip 01

rrElite Veteran

ft worth

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

10 to 15 years ago you had no choice other than to learn on a .30 size nitro heli. and you did. or you learned on a .46 or .60.

not as many options as there are now.

big is good. pick something and go with it and be safe.

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR
04-09-2010 02:46 AM  8 years agoPost 8
rexxigpilot

rrProfessor

Florida

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

A 325mm blade on a 450 can kill or seriously injure you or a bystander. One of our club members cut off his lip and nose with a Blade 400! A bit lower and he would have lost his life. He is fortunate to only have wicked scars on his face.

The added stability and easier to see orientation of a larger heli far outweights the ill conceived notion that a smaller heli is any safer. The very incorrect idea that the smaller heli is safer is one of the things that contributes to their danger.

Why don't you pick up a baby rattlesnake and see if its poison is less lethal than an adult rattlesnake's venom.

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR
04-09-2010 03:01 PM  8 years agoPost 9
Solmanbandit

rrElite Veteran

Tucson , AZ

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

I know that any heli can do harm. Finding experienced people who is willing to mentor is a daunting task. I know people now who are experienced, but have yet to find one to go fly with and help me expand. So where does that leave the majority of us who want to learn? Do we just hang out and not fly because we can't find people to mentor us? Let's think about what I have said, a person is most likely to learn to fly on his own. Would you want to see them trying to fly a big heli? I sure wouldn't because that was me last year. I smacked myself once in the leg trying to learn to hover and almost took myself out learning forward flight. Since it was a 300 size heli(CP Pro 2), smacking my leg did no damage other than an ouch. Other than safety, cost comes into play. I see on Ebay a lot where someone buys one and after a few flights, doesn't like it anymore.

Anyways, this is what started my rampage.
For my opinion, Do not ever try to fly a cheap stuff at all, espicially 450 size, this size of heli is for advanced pilot,

Then try to learn more about heli's buliding, after that, Try to fly at least 50 size, whether Electric or Nitro, this size is much staible at the air than 450 heli.
These kinds of comments is bull. The guy he is telling this too can't even get his heli off the ground safely and can't even figure out how to install his training gear.

Trex 700E / Trex 500 ESP - Ikon/ HD 500 - Ikon 2/ Goblin 500 Ikon 2

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR
04-09-2010 05:51 PM  8 years agoPost 10
crofty

rrApprentice

Phoenix, AZ - USA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

I think this is a question of assessing risk. It is likely that being hit by a smaller machine will cause less damage than being hit by a bigger machine. It does not eliminate risk it reduces it. If you could run the numbers and give 1,000,000 novices 50 size helis and another 1,000,000 450s and then count the doctor bills I think the answer would be pretty obvious.

Fortunately the wallet normally prevails. The wallet normally dictates smaller for novices. I would also make a ridiculous generalization that those novices that go out and buy a large heli to learn on fall under the "more money than sense" category and would probably skew the numbers and increase the likely hood of injury.

I have nerves of steel but thumbs of jelly!

PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR
04-10-2010 12:11 AM  8 years agoPost 11
Solmanbandit

rrElite Veteran

Tucson , AZ

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Funny you mention that. I went to a jet rally and had a guy tell me that even though they can afford it, doesn't mean they all know how to fly well. Want expensive, Heli's start about $10K and planes $15K on up. Some may be cheaper and a lot more expensive, but that is what I have seen.

Trex 700E / Trex 500 ESP - Ikon/ HD 500 - Ikon 2/ Goblin 500 Ikon 2

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR
04-10-2010 12:34 AM  8 years agoPost 12
rcmiket

rrVeteran

El Paso,Texas

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

"Fortunately the wallet normally prevails. The wallet normally dictates smaller for novices. I would also make a ridiculous generalization that those novices that go out and buy a large heli to learn on fall under the "more money than sense" category and would probably skew the numbers and increase the likely hood of injury."

If that were the case than all the new guys would be flying the $100.00 knockoffs from HK and the carnage would be devastating to the sport. Price is not the deciding factor here. Most guys who get into heli's are not all morons. They do their homework and ask questions. Some succeed and some don't just like guys who fly planks. I'm curious about one thing what even brought this topic up? Has there been some drastic rise in over 450 size Heli accidents that I'm not aware of? Every new guy who gets into helis is different some can handle a 600 right off the block others require something like a CX2 or less. I still think the 500 size is a good starter platform for someone serious about succeeding in helis. Unless that is someone can give me a solid reason why I shouldnt.
Mike

"When Inverted down is up and up is expensive"

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR
04-10-2010 01:29 AM  8 years agoPost 13
tomdavey

rrNovice

Rhode Island

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Size and stability
3 years ago, I learned to fly on a Raptor 50 nitro pretty much by myself (not many helis at my field then). The size made for a stable platform and the noise & power helped me to respect it. A little fear is a good thing. The problem with these smaller electrics is that you get hot-shots flipping it around before they can even do nose in. They all are dangerous so safety needs to be emphasized at any size.

As far as one size being better to learn on than another, that's personal preference. I like the big heli's but I've seen plenty of guys start on the smaller birds and do great. Kind of like the thumb vs. pinch debate. Do what feels right and what you can afford. But most of all BE SAFE.

TRex 600N - Raptor 50v2 - TRex 450SA - Futaba 9C

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR
04-11-2010 01:41 PM  8 years agoPost 14
ChrisMoore

rrApprentice

Bay Village, OH

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

is bigger actually more stable or does it just appear to move less because it is large?

Chris. AMA 497715 IRCHA 3351

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR
04-11-2010 02:06 PM  8 years agoPost 15
CX1

rrKey Veteran

Canada

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

if safety was a concern for noobs,
why not start them with Blade MSR or Novus ??
maybe keep them on probation for 6 months
if after 6 mths they are still interested move them up to a 450 size
LOL
I'm doing that to my neighbor

btw
I went from cx to Hawk pro with out the training gear
is bigger actually more stable or does it just appear to move less because it is large?
IMO
the larger the rotor disk the slower it moves
a 450 is faster then a 90

like comparing a humming bird to a pigeon

" Team Protoast "

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR
04-11-2010 04:24 PM  8 years agoPost 16
cdrking

rrElite Veteran

Seattle

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

An idiot with 325 mm blades is not a good thing. I suggest all idiots not get into helis.

If you use common sense and get help a 90 size machine is no more dangerous than a 450 size machine. The problem I have seen lately is that there are so many people getting into the hobby and their build skills and knowledge of basic setup is not where it should be. And some of these people choose not to get help and choose not to read and learn.

Jeff

To hover is divine, the alternative is rather PLANE.

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR
04-11-2010 07:18 PM  8 years agoPost 17
Solmanbandit

rrElite Veteran

Tucson , AZ

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Finding help isn't all that easy. Most of us have to learn on our own and even then, you still have to learn to pick out which advice is good.

Trex 700E / Trex 500 ESP - Ikon/ HD 500 - Ikon 2/ Goblin 500 Ikon 2

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR
04-11-2010 07:53 PM  8 years agoPost 18
helibeast

rrApprentice

Mn

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

When I started flying there wasn't a internet so I did a thing that some have forgotten about. I bought books about RC helis. A book from the designer of a RC heli can be trusted. A book from a world champion flier can be trusted.

Champion,Magic,MiniBoy,Xcell60+50,Intrepid,Intrepid Gas,Baron30,Whisper,300X,mCPXv1v2,Concept,Nexus

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR
04-12-2010 04:49 PM  8 years agoPost 19
Rogman88

rrElite Veteran

West Monroe, LA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Some of the posts I've read seem to assume someone is going to get hit by a heli by a new pilot so he might as well strike the innocent bystander with a smaller heli instead of a larger one. But what is the actual incidence of people actually getting struck by helis? I would venture to say somewhere in the .0001 percentile probably less. If you factor in all the millions of people flying heli's around the world flying multiple flights per outing etc the actual incidence of a heli striking a person would be quite rare. The law of probablility of folks getting struck with 450 and under helis is probably higher due to more folks don't want to make the big investment in an expensive heli at first thus many more new pilots have 450 sized heli's.
As far as the 250 and less sized helis go in respect to a new pilot. Every sub 400 sized heli I've seen fly has been a handful and is quite squirly. Many folks have tried flying them as newbies and got discouraged due to the difficulty level associated with small helis (non- coaxial). I don't really like flying my 450V2 anymore since getting my 600ESP due to it not being as stable.

I personally started with a 450V2 and quickly flew it into my house because I was trying maneuvers I shouldn't have been trying because my orientation training wasn't sufficient at the time. An inexpensive heli was what I needed early on because I hit the ground alot when learning (I didn't get a good simulator until later). I moved up to 600 sized heli and in 6 months have never wrecked it.

How did I get into this long post anyway? Sorry.

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR
04-12-2010 05:06 PM  8 years agoPost 20
ErichF

rrElite Veteran

Sutton, NH

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

I have seen a HUGE spike in the "look at my blade gash" posts and incidents since the 450 electrics became popular.

Folks learning on 30 and 50 nitros 4-5 years ago tended to respect their models more, and kept their distance. They also would usually seek experienced help with their model.

Enter the 450 electric era...folks are checking blade tracking while holding the heli in their hand, flying around in their face, and generally hold less respect for these models.

So, in my opinion, the false assumption that larger nitro helis being more dangerous to learn with is rather a misconception brought about from newer folks' experience and bad habits with 450 size models.

Erich

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR
WATCH
 8 pages [ <<    <    ( 1 )     2      3     NEXT    >> ] 12794 views TOPIC CLOSED
HomeAircraftHelicopterSafety - RC Helis are not toys › Telling newbies to go big
 Print TOPIC  Make Suggestion 

 21  Topic Subscribe

Sunday, October 21 - 1:08 pm - Copyright © 2000-2018 RunRyder   EMAILEnable Cookies

The RC discussion world needs to consolidate. RR is now one choice for that. Its software is cutting edge. It hosts on-topic advertising. Help RR increase traffic buy making suggestions, posting in RR's new areas (sites) and by spreading the word.

The RunRyder Difference

• Category system to allow Rep/Vendor postings.
• Classifieds with sold (hidden) category.
• Classifieds with separate view new.
• Answer PMs offsite via email reply.
• Member gallery photos with advanced scripting.
• Gallery photo viewer integrated into postings.
• Highly refined search with advanced back end.
• Hosts its own high end fast response servers.
• Hosts thousands of HD event coverage videos.
• Rewrote entire code base with latest technology.
• No off-topic (annoying) click bait advertising.
Login Here
 New Subscriptions 
 Buddies Online