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Home✈️Aircraft🚁HelicopterBeginners Corner › Flight stabilization system ?
02-26-2010 10:37 PM  10 years ago
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ianlor

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Dallas, Texas

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Flight stabilization system ?
Is it worth investing in a stabilization system if you are new pilot.
I have a trex600 and wanted to hear your opinions, brand suggestions, features and prices.
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02-26-2010 10:50 PM  10 years ago
ScottV

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El Dorado Hills, CA

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I personally feel that you should not get one. It is better to put the money into a sim and practice there as much as possible. The reason I am against the idea is that you will not get to feel what the true flight characteristics is of your heli and you would have to learn all over again once you take it off. Make sure you have a good pilot check your heli before you put it in the air, Just have them go over the settings on your radio and check to make sure your swash and all the connectors are aligned. And especially make sure the tail is set up properly. Every time I think I had a heli setup right a more advanced pilot always found something that I missed or was able to fine tune it for me.

Another great thing is to find a local flying club and join, next to a sim I think it is the smartest thing you can do. I love getting help form others, especially with setup which is so crucial.

That is just my opinion, and I am sure you will get both yes and no on your question.

And if you already have a sim, use the extra moeny for parts. And welcome to the club.
So long and thanks for all the fish!
`·.¸¸.·´¯`·.. ><((((º>`·.¸¸.·´¯`·.¸><((((º>
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02-26-2010 10:58 PM  10 years ago
ianlor

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Dallas, Texas

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Thanks for comments
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02-27-2010 01:21 AM  10 years ago
Jakeskully

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CA

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I agree with Scott. more SIM time. although some will argue stabilization systems can save you from a crash - true.

but at the same time it may develop bad piloting skills.

I would say learn to fly without one in the beginning and decide later on if you need it.

I started off without one then used it after. I do not fly 3D. only normal flying around. I fly the heli farther and higher than most normal situations so the stab system has saved me.
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02-27-2010 01:42 AM  10 years ago
ianlor

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Dallas, Texas

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Jake, do you have a switch to activate in an emergency, or is it on all the time?
PS. I do have a sim and am practising on it all the time.
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02-27-2010 01:50 AM  10 years ago
Jakeskully

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CA

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depends on which system you use. most of them can be activated with a switch of slider.

stab systems can help you learn as well until you feel comfortable with your orientation. you can fly with it on all the time. they're great for scale helis or aerial type work.
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02-27-2010 01:56 AM  10 years ago
ianlor

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Dallas, Texas

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I would assume that it does not give a beginner "bad habits" if one switches it on only when you get into trouble..........or is that the bad habit?
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02-27-2010 12:31 PM  10 years ago
rotormonkey

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Ottawa, ON - Canada

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I don't think you'll develop "bad habits" if you put it on a switch. I agree with the others though in saying you're probably better off learning without it.

Mainly because they're REALLY expensive. For the cost of a helicommand you could buy a whole new helicopter. You'll get many a crash out of that money before it pays for itself. Also keep in mind that if you do put it on a switch you need to have the presence of mind to hit that switch when you lose it; And quickly! If you're not quick enough on the switch then you may as well just not have it at all.

That being said there's lots of guys out there that swear by these stab systems. They can't all be wrong. But I learned without one. If *I* can do it ANYONE can
If it can't hover, it ain't worth flying.
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02-27-2010 02:16 PM  10 years ago
JRjoe

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Jonesville , IN USA #1

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Forget about it, get a sim...
JRjoe.....
Indoor plumbing??? No, we don't need that!!!
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02-27-2010 03:30 PM  10 years ago
rexxigpilot

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rexxig2@comcast.net

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Forget the stabilization system. Use your sim and get a buddy box set up with an experienced pilot. We have one guy in our club who tried more than one stab system. None of them worked for him. He's been trying to fly a heli for over a year without success. By that I mean flying more than a couple feet off the ground and not panicking and jamming the heli into the ground when it got a little out of control.

We got him on the buddy box a couple of weeks ago. It was the first time he could fly his heli around and know there would not be a crash as a result. He was smiling for ear to ear afterwards.

Years ago a buddy box was used for training most new RC pilots - planks and helis alike. Now, for some strange reason everyone wants to go it alone. I suppose the reliance on sims has something to do with this.

Often we will see the pseudo buddy box where an experienced pilot will stand next to the novice. The novice then hands the TX to the experienced guy if the novice loses control. The problem with this is it takes too long to transfer the TX in many cases, particularly if a neck strap is used.

Most of the time you will be able to find someone with a compatible TX to buddy box with, so it costs nothing. Even if the novice has to buy his own spare TX, it still costs less than a stab system. Ths spare TX can be used as a back-up, to train others, or sold after the novice learns to fly on his own.
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02-27-2010 06:07 PM  10 years ago
RescueRev

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Albany, Oregon

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Auto pilot
I am new to RC helicopters and have not flown my used Rave 450 yet. I am saving for a TX. I thought about this very subject and I also believe it is better to learn to fly the helicopter without it. How can I say this with no RC helicopter experience. I have 22 years of flight time flying in a Coast Guard rescue helicopters as the rescue man in the back. When not flying I was a helicopter mechanic the rest of the time. Our pilots were required to learn how to fly without the auto pilot. I don't know if that has changed since I retired from the Coast Guard some time ago. One other point, you can still crash with a auto pilot and destroy the auto pilot in the crash. Anyway just my $0.02 worth of input.

RescueRec
RescueRev
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02-27-2010 08:29 PM  10 years ago
RcRules

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Akron ohio Usa

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I myself am new to helis,i will soon be biulding a trex 500.I looked into those .But i decided to go the sim route and msr indoor route.In the end i would rather learn to fly my copter than have a computer do it for me just my opinion. Rich
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02-27-2010 11:49 PM  10 years ago
ianlor

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Dallas, Texas

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Thanks guys for your views.
So far the feeling seems to be use the sim. and a buddy !
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03-03-2010 04:15 AM  10 years ago
JasonJ

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North Idaho

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I would assume that it does not give a beginner "bad habits" if one switches it on only when you get into trouble..........or is that the bad habit?
Here is the reality of the so-called "safety switch". It seems so easy: I'll just flip a switch if I get in trouble. The reality is unless you are high up, you will crash before the switch gets flipped. Most new pilots don't go high enough to allow for reaction time, time to flip the switch, and time for the helicopter to save itself.

If you do manage to get the switch flipped and save the helicopter, what did you just learn? Did you learn the stick inputs required to save the helicopter, or did you learn how to flip a switch?

How hard do you think it is to unlearn something verses learn something? You don't want to ingrain something like flipping a switch instead of proper stick inputs. It will bite you later on.

I tried a stab system early on and ditched it quickly. The helicopter didn't feel right, and I recognized that I didn't want to have to unlearn anything. Plus you know what? I wanted to be able to say with pride that I learned without a stab system. I won't say it's cheating, but I sure felt like it was.

The sim was what got me through the hovering wall into proper flight. With the sim, you spend the money once and that's it. You learn to properly fly through repetition. You can't get the kind of repetition with a stab system that you can on the sim.

With the sim, you can fly as long as you want, day or night, in any weather. With a stab system you are still limited by flight time, conditions, and crash costs. Yes, you can still crash with a stab system.

Long story short, in my opinion, spend the money on a sim.
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03-03-2010 06:17 PM  10 years ago
ianlor

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Dallas, Texas

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I have taken the majority advice and am putting hours into the SIM.
Thanks for everyones opinion.
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