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HomeAircraftHelicopterMain Discussion › The Future of helicopter
01-16-2010 02:12 AM  8 years agoPost 21
skidbender

rrApprentice

Morehead,KY

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And as long as folks keep buying ARF'f, it will only get worse.

It don't matter how you get there, if you don't know where your going.

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01-16-2010 02:16 AM  8 years agoPost 22
Yug

rrMaster

UK. Herts

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Times are hard for real LHSs given the competition of internet based sellers as well as the modern day mentality of 'get something for nothing'. This doesn't really apply to true modelling enthusiasts as is the case at my local field where you get some fly-by-night-chuck-it-and-see types while the core members are scratch or real builders. Sadly, only a few of these are real flyers but WTF, it takes allsorts.

Vegetable rights and Peace

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01-16-2010 02:45 AM  8 years agoPost 23
Justin Stuart (RIP)

rrMaster

Plano, Texas

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I think the ARF airplanes is one of the best things that has come to this hobby. I remember back in the day spending 5-6 months building an airplane, and then when it crashed it felt like your dog got hit by a car. Now, when you crash your ARF, you're out $250 but no blood, sweat, or tears are shed.

Yet with the helis, I do not trust the ARFs. I bought a fully built 450 ARF once, but had to completely take it apart before I felt comfortable enough to fly it. There were screws that had no Loctite on them. With the airplane ARFs, it is kind of the same thing. Before you can fly them, you have to go through and reinforce much of the glue joints, especially on critical places like the landing gear and engine mount.

Avant RC
Scorpion Power Systems
Thunder Power RC
Kontronik Drives

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01-16-2010 10:55 AM  8 years agoPost 24
Terrabit

rrElite Veteran

Seattle, WA - USA

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I would much rather unwrap, inspect, and assemble every single part to my specifications. I've done exactly this more than a dozen times. I've done major rebuilds countless more. I'll even go so far as to say that I am damn good at it. There is probably no part on any of my helis that I can't replace or repair in fifteen minutes or less.

In my opinion if you don't learn how to build, repair, and tune your heli you won't last in this hobby - unless you're rich. And with all the help to be found here and elsewhere there is simply no good reason not to.

Just my opinion.

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01-16-2010 02:30 PM  8 years agoPost 25
geink

rrApprentice

nova scotia, Canada

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size designation
Hi,
I was out of helicopters a few years back, back then helos were ident by the size of engine -ie .30 .40 .60 .90 and now even larger gas heli,s.
since then they have come out with 250, 300, 450, 600, 700,and even larger heli. Is that suppose to be the legnth of the main rotor blade ?
I must have missed something.

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01-16-2010 03:45 PM  8 years agoPost 26
Justin Stuart (RIP)

rrMaster

Plano, Texas

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Is that suppose to be the legnth of the main rotor blade ?
I've wondered the exact same thing. I think this is Align's designations, and so the rest of the world followed them. You can still find new helis that are listed by engine size such as the soon to be released Miniature Aircraft Fury 55 which is supposed to use a .55 engine.

Avant RC
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01-16-2010 03:55 PM  8 years agoPost 27
Jim-bob

rrApprentice

Little Hocking OH USA

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I remember back in the day spending 5-6 months building an airplane, and then when it crashed it felt like your dog got hit by a car. Now, when you crash your ARF, you're out $250 but no blood, sweat, or tears are shed.
I respectfully suggest this is why ARF,s have taken alot away from the fixed wing portion of our sport. You don't have the tears from that crash but you also don't feel the same sense of accomplishment that can only come from something you built and covered yourself.

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01-16-2010 10:26 PM  8 years agoPost 28
Dirthead

rrApprentice

Thornton Co.

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I really dont think that anyone whos never built and trimmed and adjusted there own heli has any idea of the satisfaction, not to mention the PRIDE of that maden flight. If you dont feel comfortable with building your own then I dont think you should even fly at all.
I know I was a very good mechanic long before I was ever even close to a decent pilot, which is the way it should be. If you dont know if somthing is wrong then you are a danger to yourself and anyone who may be around.

Keep ur head out the dirt only in the grass

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01-17-2010 12:49 AM  8 years agoPost 29
2tall

rrVeteran

Crystal Lake, Illinois, USA

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ARF is here because that is the major market - plane (sic) and simple. If the masses didn't want it they wouldn't buy it, and it would be gone. No one is buying ARF kits at gun point.

I'm about to retire from my second career and have spent the past nine years working six and seven days a week, and I know I'm not alone. Without ARF, RC flying would not have been an option for me.

Having said that, there are some issues essential to ARF. First, manufacturers need to accept responsibility for their work. Don't sell me an ARF something or other and then insist that I disassemble and reassemble various components in order to make sure that the original build was accomplished correctly. If you can't do it flawlessly at the factory, every time, then leave it undone. Did anyone take apart their PC prior to first boot just to make sure Mrs. Acer Dell was not having a bad day during final assembly?

Yes, building an RC Heli from the ground up provides both entertainment and education. I'm building a Century Predator now, probably my 12th kit build since the Heli-Boy I started with in the early 70s. However, I can't imagine a complete novice taking on this kit without a mentor and/or Runryder. The instructions are vague, parts and alignment are different than those pictured in the IB, I could go on and on.

So what is worse, a total newbee attempting a complex, poorly documented kit unassisted, or working through the electronics install in a well done ARF?

Perhaps the best middle ground would be to leave the mechanics build and set-up as an unbuilt kit, while providing well fitted, detailed ARF scale bodies as an option.

As always, that's just my opinion - and I could be wrong.

"Pay attention...lest the ground rise up and smite thee."

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01-30-2010 10:32 PM  8 years agoPost 30
geink

rrApprentice

nova scotia, Canada

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How far ahead in time is it when == We take our heli to the flying field , put a fully charged battery in it, push a button, the helicopter goes flying by itself and you go sit with your buddies , have a beer and chat.

What would we do for the good old day,s

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01-31-2010 12:46 AM  8 years agoPost 31
B.Waitkus

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Massachusetts

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01-31-2010 03:48 AM  8 years agoPost 32
KCinNC

rrApprentice

Mooresville, NC

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i crashed my T-500 big time a few weeks ago. i have all the repair parts ready. i'm actually excited about tearing it down and rebuilding it !!! i love tweaking this stuff

nothing to it but to do it

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01-31-2010 05:57 AM  8 years agoPost 33
JetFire

rrKey Veteran

The Golden STATE

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ARF... has its place IMO. I personally, started off with an ARF kit as my first Nitro heli and I've observed that it helped me gain confidence back then when I didn't know any local heli pilots at the time nor did I have the learning tools I have today. I honestly don't think it slows the learning process down because I can easily build a heli just as easy as the next guy present day. Don't get me wrong, I enjoy building my helis from ground up. In fact I prefer it in kit form now because I have some knowledge under my belt. In a nutshell, We all have different reasons why we chose the rout to get where we at today and it really doesn't matter which approach you chose because it gets you flying either way. Having said that, I certainly hope not everything will come in ARF form in the future because I for one would like the choice.

my2cents


Trex700N Pro
DX8-2.4
Spartan/BL9088

-The ONLY way you fail is when you quit.-

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01-31-2010 06:14 AM  8 years agoPost 34
Aaron29

rrProfessor

USA

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My personal opinionis I thnk that techonolgy is coming to that point some day where you don't have to sit and built a heli it will already be prebuilt just add radio and go fly.
We sort of have this right now with helis like the Blade 400. The Raptor 30 has an ARF model. I think the head is built on the JR birds and if you buy a Trex 450 it looks like you bolt 4 or 5 pieces together. Hard to tell but as it sits in the box it looks built.

The only problem is crashes.

I'll be rebuilding it soon after I buy it and fly it for the first time, so it doesn't matter to me if it's built for me or not.

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01-31-2010 01:32 PM  8 years agoPost 35
XxCaTMaNxX

rrApprentice

Navarre, FL - U.S.A.

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There are a lot of complaints about ARF, yet bind-and-fly seems to be so popular in the classifieds on this and other forums. Are we to trust another heli-mans build more than the manufacturers? I wouldn't.
I spend 9 to 10 months of the year at sea. If it weren't for ARF, I would never get any flying done. If I wanted to spend all of my free time building, I would have gotten into models or basket weaving. I think I get the same satisfaction trimming a Trex600 for hands off hover as some may completing a kit build. Even more so when I get it right the first time.

Feel free to toss some IMO's in there...

I told the doctor I broke my leg in two places. He told me to quit going to those places...

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02-01-2010 03:40 AM  8 years agoPost 36
MANCHA

rrVeteran

Cabo San Lucas, Baja- Mexico

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R/C is like anything else in the hobby world, some years my GOLF handicap has been 11 and other years 23; it has always BEEN UP TO what job I have and what is my work load.

Same for R/C hobby, some years I have been able to build and some others I have been perfectly happy with ARF.

It is a no contest IMO.

As for the heli future: alternate fuels, more space age materials, better & friendlier FBL systems and more powerful & smaller batteries and; I am sure much, lighter electronics.

MANCHA

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02-01-2010 06:30 AM  8 years agoPost 37
gboden

rrNovice

Chugiak, AK

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I spend 9 to 10 months of the year at sea. If it weren't for ARF, I would never get any flying done.
I agree. There is no better thing than a RTF to get into or keep up with flying while being deployed or when time just isn't there for a build. BNF and RTF doesn't mean its airworthy. It just means I get all the stuff that I need with one payment.

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02-01-2010 09:12 AM  8 years agoPost 38
helicopter nut

rrNovice

pleasanton, ca usa

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My first model heli was built in 1980 from scratch. Just a plywood frame and bearing blocks, homemade clutch and cooling fan for a 40. The thing was fixed pitch, no gyro, four channels and a handful to fly at all. It took several blades (all hand made) to just get to hover a little. Four years ago, after being out of the R/C helicopter game for many years, I broke down and got an RTF job mail order style. It was a far cry from building pattern machines or my first R/C helicopter. It flew right out of the box well enough that I began to like helicopters. That led to a cp type and then to my EXI 450 which has been my trusted friend for a year of flying. I would say I hate RTF, but it has a place. I might even try a nitro heli again now, but that will be home made...

Lord hear our silent prayers to Thee
For those who fly from ships at sea.

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02-01-2010 09:28 AM  8 years agoPost 39
Parsifal

rrVeteran

Singapore

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Easy to build stuff has made my life easier, but at the same time, it has brought a lot of people into the hobby that i wish had never started.

You know the sort, the people who buy cheap ready made junk, don't pay attention, crash into people, and then go out and buy another one when their present model is a pile of scrap.

It is sadly the way the hobby has been moving of late, shame if you ask me. I miss the days where guys would spend winters building their models and care for them enough not to do stupid things at the field. Those days are gone sadly.

Pars

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02-01-2010 11:09 PM  8 years agoPost 40
chopper_crazy

rrElite Veteran

Delphos, Ohio

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Even though I don't fully enjoy building helis, it definately has its advantage when you need to work on it. There are a lot of things that I would have no idea about if I didn't build it myself.

It's a complex, costly, glow powered anti-gravity machine!

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