RunRyder RC
WATCH
 9 pages [ <<    <     6      7     ( 8 )     9     NEXT    >> ] 8486 views POST REPLY
HomeAircraftHelicopterMain Discussion › Loosing eyesight with age a major problem!
01-23-2010 04:58 PM  8 years agoPost 141
Daves

rrApprentice

Tallahassee, Florida

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Paul,

You are correct. I should have added a caveat about the High Index Plastic lens. Actually, glass would be better, but my optometrist told me that my Rx was such that the weight of glass lens would make them extremely uncomfortable and therefore recommended the High Index plastic.

I probably would have given contacts a try earlier, but no way with bi-focals. I've heard too many complaints and again my opto recommended against them.

The key to all of this is to provide your opto with detailed information about your life style including work place and hobbies.

-- dave --

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-23-2010 05:28 PM  8 years agoPost 142
Reesy

rrKey Veteran

In the doghouse ... Nottingham UK

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

100% spot on there Dave

Glass is "theoretically" better but in the real world the difference is very slight and it's heavy and if a whirlybit flies towards you....

Hi index plastic can be good but it depends a bit on your prescription.

FWIW
I have 2 pairs of specs I use for flying:
1. a clear pair distance optimised to green with Anti-Reflection coating for lower and normal light these have the highest possible LTF (light transmission factor) and give the closest approximation to perfect vision.
2. a similar pair with a 15% LTF tint and AR coating which OFC I wear when it's too bright for the clear lenses.

Both are single vision for flying as I'll tolerate not a smidge of any other correction while twiddling the sticks, for fettling I put on vari's or readers depending on whats to hand.

Some guys I know swear by a more yellow tint and these can work extremely well in certain conditions.

As far as contact bifocals go the latest designs do work (I describe them to my Px's as female lenses, I've read the manual, done the theory but no way can I explain how they work)
But if I were to wear CL's I'd simply get a small supply of 1Day (distance Rx) lenses, we do have some who use monovision normally and simply wear 2x Distance for flying

Paul

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-23-2010 06:18 PM  8 years agoPost 143
pgoelz

rrVeteran

Rochester MI

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

The lens itself is designed with concentric rings that defract light differntly depending on if you are looking close or far.
So you have distance correction in the center and near correction all around the periphery? Nice for working under the dash of your car and looking up, but I'd like to hear what your experiences are flying with them. Kinda like looking through the clear center of a slightly foggy tunnel?

Paul

Paul Goelz
Rochester MI USA
http://www.pgoelz.com

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  Attn:RR  Quote
01-23-2010 08:00 PM  8 years agoPost 144
hootowl

rrProfessor

Garnet Valley, Pa.

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Remember the lens is moving with your eye. Not like glasses where you have a sweet spot that doesn't move but your eyes do and your peripheral vision is compromised by the rest of the glass and the frame.

Wolves don't lose sleep over the opinions of sheep

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-23-2010 08:18 PM  8 years agoPost 145
wopwop

rrNovice

St Augustine, FL

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Don't give up hope!!
I have always been nearsighted (about 20/600), until I had Lasik surgery on both eyes back in 2000. Then like a miracle I had 20/20 and 20/15 vision for about 6 years, then my eyesight began to get nearsighted again at an alarming rate. I figured it was just part of getting older. I notice when flying my RC planker, I had a hard time seeing its orientation. I wouldn't dare fly helis. So I just got a bigger model (1/4 scale) - that helped a little but I was still having difficulty with orientation. When I went to the DMV to renew my license they made me look into a machine and read the letters. I couldn't even see the letters with my left eye and had great difficulty with my right eye. They said I needed a letter from my optometrist stating my vision was OK. Well, to make a long story short, my optemetrist said "I see your problem" - "you have cataracts!" After having cataract surgery on both eyes and implanting artificial lenses, my vision is back to 20/20 and am back to flying heli's - and loving it. The cataract surgery was a very simple and painless procedure (about 30 minutes per eye) and much easier to go through than a root canal. I can't believe I've had these problems since I am only 65!!

PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR  Quote
01-25-2010 12:12 AM  8 years agoPost 146
Dilbeck

rrElite Veteran

Springdale Arkansas

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

. I can't believe I've had these problems since I am only 65!!
Well f@$k me, Im only 47 and i had 20/20 vision and now cant see $hit. I guess its time to go get it checked out.

Clint

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-25-2010 01:47 AM  8 years agoPost 147
zjoffe

rrNovice

Bahama, NC

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Very helpful info. Does progressive lenses have any affect on depth perception
Zalman

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-25-2010 01:52 AM  8 years agoPost 148
Yug

rrMaster

UK. Herts

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Dilbeck - me 47 too, scary how this happens at this age. Perhaps a healthy dose of magic mushrooms and a firm belief that I'm still a teenager would rectify this !

Vegetable rights and Peace

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-25-2010 01:57 AM  8 years agoPost 149
Dilbeck

rrElite Veteran

Springdale Arkansas

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Clint

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-25-2010 02:37 AM  8 years agoPost 150
pgoelz

rrVeteran

Rochester MI

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Very helpful info. Does progressive lenses have any affect on depth perception
In my case (farsighted with progressive eyeglasses) the progressives have no noticeable effect on depth perception. Unless you move your head so distance objects are well below the center of the lenses, it is as if you were wearing single vision lenses. This assumes you get properly fitted, and that for me has been quite a voyage. The first couple tries were spectacularly awful. But when they finally got it right, they work very well. The correction transitions smoothly from distance to closeup as you tilt your head to place the desired object in the correct part of the lens. This is much more automatic and intuitive than you would think.

Flying is unaffected if you are looking anywhere close to directly at the heli.

One small issue when flying is sunglasses. Unless you like the bugeye look of the ones that go over your prescription glasses, your choices are either prescription sunglasses or clip-ons. I have several pair of decent clip-ons but finding good ones that fit and do not have noticeable optical aberrations is not an easy task. And I also find that the reflections between the surfaces decrease contrast quite a bit. It helps to wear a cap with a bill that covers the top of the glasses.

The only real danger is going down stairs... if you can see under the bottom of the lenses when you look down, the stairs are perceived as being in a different place through the lenses vs. under them.

Paul

Paul Goelz
Rochester MI USA
http://www.pgoelz.com

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  Attn:RR  Quote
01-25-2010 08:12 AM  8 years agoPost 151
Reesy

rrKey Veteran

In the doghouse ... Nottingham UK

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Pretty good summary there Paul.

As I mentioned above I ended up getting a straight distance pair for flying, just raising your head into the "zone" for a moment cost me an "upgrade opportunity" which proved far more expensive than a simple pair of distance specs.

The "voyage" you refer to sums it up, in simple terms work out how many hours a week you fly, then how many you drive, look at a computer, read etc. Optimising the Rx for flying prob isn't the most logical when you think of it like that.
EDIT
Sorry just to clear that up, it's possible to optimise Varifocals for driving, VDU or reading by raising/lowering a mm or so and altering whats called the pantoscopic angle (angle from vertical as looked at from the side) we tend to work on the "most used" of the 3 as a rule.

There is a clip on that is pretty good, they have an anti reflection coating and retail for about £25 but still you have the effect of four lens surfaces rather than 2 which can go whoosh if the sun hits them obliquely.

Paul

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
01-25-2010 02:03 PM  8 years agoPost 152
Daves

rrApprentice

Tallahassee, Florida

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Guys,

With respect to choices for sunglasses, I highly recommend the Bolle glasses. They have many styles from which to choose and several with perscription inserts. You buy the glasses for around $50-$80 and then an Rx adapter for around $20-$25.

The glasses come with several different colored lens and the Rx adapter just pops into the frame behind the lens. They offer 2 different sizes of Rx adapters.

Advantage: You have multiple colors of lens (for different flying conditions) and if you need to change your perscription, you don't have to throw away your sunglasses and start over with a totally new pair.

I use the larger of the 2 Rx adapters because I wear progressive lens and the added size gives me a better field of vision. However, I have also successfully used the smaller adapter.

Take a look, just Google "Bolle". There are multiple stores that offer them. If you want to see a pair up close, check out one of the sun glasses shops in your local shopping mall.

-- dave --

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
03-22-2010 12:14 AM  8 years agoPost 153
RICH.L

rrKey Veteran

gentry arkansas

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

since I got my glasses my bowling average has gone up 17 pins per game!!

And that is in 3 months!

I can't wait to see how much my golf improves now with the new glasses.

I may have to give up my mini titan e325,I am having a hard time with all the little screws.(even the bi-focals don't help)

rich

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
03-22-2010 12:26 AM  8 years agoPost 154
Clearance

rrVeteran

Rain Forest of Western Canada

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Yet another problem with age:

Massive Floaters right in my line of vision!!!

Worst in my right eye now, long dark ribbons swimming around, and no one knows what I can do about them.

Frustrating. Can't track the heli properly.

Ken

PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR  Quote
03-22-2010 01:32 AM  8 years agoPost 155
ADHD

rrApprentice

Jacksonville, FL

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

I think Alan Szabo Jr is testing some new Align glasses...

I generally don't have problems until it gets into the tree line.. then depth perception becomes a pain.

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
03-22-2010 02:55 AM  8 years agoPost 156
B.Waitkus

rrVeteran

Massachusetts

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

psychedelics may help, may worsen

Brandon W

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
04-02-2010 02:41 PM  8 years agoPost 157
hootowl

rrProfessor

Garnet Valley, Pa.

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Earlier in this topic I reported that I had Clear Lens Replacemnt surgery done. Basically cataract surgery except I didn't have cataracts. The lenses I had "installed" are Restor brand. So far here are my experiences.

Before the surgery without glasses my vision was clear in the 10 foot range only. I needed glasses for long distance including driving and I needed glasses to read.

I was finally into bifocals.

All I can say is building helis and seeing them flying was always less then optimum. I could not get used to flying with corrective lenses. I didn't have good depth perception or peripheral vision. Working close I hated constantly having to tilt my head to see what I was doing. Sunglasses had to be clip-ons or prescription.

These new implants are designed for near and far correction.

Yesterday was the first time flying in a large area with my Trex450. I was wearing non prescription sun glasses. I have my eyes back again in far vision 100%. Absolutely amazing to see without the restrictions of prescription glasses. Crystal clear and my depth perception is back 100%.

The close up vision is not as good as I would have liked but still very good. These lenses require good lighting to be able to focus. Reading on a white background in good lighting at reading distance is excellent. Reading in low lighting and non-white background is challenging. I have to take a pair of magnifying reading glasses to read the menu at the restaurant.

Night vision for driving is excellent. Low lighting does not effect distance vision. I do have some haloing with bright lights. This I will get used to and ignore over time. It's caused by the concentric rings in the lenses that give me my close focus.

Using the computer I have to have my face at reading distance for optimum focus about 12-14 inches.

Working on helis, I do have to use the reading glasses because my focal distance is pretty limited to the reading distance. 3D objects do not focus consistantly but with reading glasses it's perfect.

I'm free! Tested vision is 20/20, 20/25.

Wolves don't lose sleep over the opinions of sheep

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
04-03-2010 01:24 AM  8 years agoPost 158
Dilbeck

rrElite Veteran

Springdale Arkansas

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Thanks for sharing your results. Gives me something to consider with everything out there. What was your vision before the surgery, and what was the total cost to correct it? Im 47 and 50 is just crawling up the back porch. Im going to have to do something eventually, Right? Ive read every reply and heard some good and bad and am a little scared to make my eyes worse but excited about the possible 20/20 vision. Seems to be a lot of different procedures out there and finding the right one for a particular individual is one of research.

Clint

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
04-03-2010 01:37 AM  8 years agoPost 159
hootowl

rrProfessor

Garnet Valley, Pa.

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

I'm 51. I don't know what my old numbers were. I would have to look at my records. They weren't horrible but I required glasses for near and far.

Cost is around $4000 per eye which included all visits, five weeks of drops and if I needed laser tweek which I did not. So about $8000 out of pocket for the whole thing. Insurance will not cover it.

Procedure takes you out of work for the day, back the next. NO PAIN.

Not cheap but it's done, paid for and I'm in heaven.

Wolves don't lose sleep over the opinions of sheep

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
04-03-2010 01:55 AM  8 years agoPost 160
Dilbeck

rrElite Veteran

Springdale Arkansas

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

So about $8000 out of pocket for the whole thing. Insurance will not cover it.
Damn, there went the turbine! 8 thoussssand dollars? I may have to think this one through a little longer.

Clint

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
WATCH
 9 pages [ <<    <     6      7     ( 8 )     9     NEXT    >> ] 8486 views POST REPLY
HomeAircraftHelicopterMain Discussion › Loosing eyesight with age a major problem!
 Print TOPIC  Make Suggestion 

 42  Topic Subscribe

Sunday, August 19 - 8:37 am - Copyright © 2000-2018 RunRyder   EMAILEnable Cookies

Login Here
 New Subscriptions 
 Buddies Online