RunRyder RC
 5  Topic Subscribe
WATCH
 1 page 671 views POST REPLY
HomeAircraftHelicopterMain Discussion › Curious, What's the max G rating helis endure in those 3D flights?
03-09-2008 05:06 AM  10 years agoPost 1
aerton

rrVeteran

Longueuil, QC, Canada

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Anyone has any idea about it or data?
Really curious to find out.

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
03-09-2008 06:01 AM  10 years agoPost 2
Gam

rrApprentice

Australia

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Lots!

PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR  Quote
03-09-2008 01:31 PM  10 years agoPost 3
krashtagain

rrKey Veteran

ohio

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

depends on who's doing the stick stirring

If you're not living on the edge you're just taking up space !

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
03-09-2008 02:04 PM  10 years agoPost 4
Yug

rrMaster

UK. Herts

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

When the heli hits the ground

Vegetable rights and Peace

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
03-09-2008 03:02 PM  10 years agoPost 5
Seablade

rrKey Veteran

earth

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Somebody should have tested this by now at some of the bigger manufacturers, but who?
Without trying to give you a smart answer - more then any human can survive!

"Vini, Vidi, Velcro"

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
03-09-2008 04:04 PM  10 years agoPost 6
holzback

rrKey Veteran

noblesville IN United States

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

i would say around 15-20. watching szabo do the wall, i can almost feel it.

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
03-09-2008 04:43 PM  10 years agoPost 7
nighttrain

rrApprentice

Louisville KY

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Our models can only "sustain" about 3 1/2 to 4 Gs. Instantaneous G's can spike to about 5. Any aircraft in a steady state (not climbing/ desending, accelerating in any direction) 82degree Angle of bank, coordinated turn is at 4 Gs. 60 degrees AOB is 2 Gs or 2 times the models weight, still very impressive. Try putting your model in a tight turning circle increasing AOB and back stick staying level and not slowing down. It must be steady state. You'd be lucky to get 3 Gs. You can then multiply that by about 1.5 to see how much you can spike. Don't confuse Gs with quickness. Sustained G is our concern and is an expression of power. The G "spike" is a structural concern in getting our model back in one piece. Some maneuvers store up momentum and do a spike maneuver but it's not sustainable. The energy is depleted and must be regained again, hence the above expression of power available is our primary concern again. Jet fighter planes trade altitude for more Gs, you could also trade speed for more G in a spike turn, maybe for the kill shot. Facing an opponent, your concern is how powerful is it, ie., how much G can he sustain. Most models ought to be around 3Gs.

PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR  Quote
03-09-2008 05:06 PM  10 years agoPost 8
RayJayJohnsonJr

rrKey Veteran

Midwest

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Endure doesn't equal sustained. I don't care about max sustained G's, I'd like to know how many G's some of these guys are putting on their machines in HARD 3D flight. Surely there's a small electronic accelerometer available to find out. Would very pretty interesting. I'll bet the 'number' is right up there!

-Mark

There, their and they're. It's really that simple.

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
03-09-2008 05:36 PM  10 years agoPost 9
Leif

rrElite Veteran

USA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Sustained Gs only tells you how powerful the engine is. It doesn't tell you the capabilities of the airframe. It also doesn't answer the OP's question...

Pull-outs at the bottom of falling moves (tail-slides) and fast direction-switching moves like "the wall" probably reach the highest Gs. I don't know the actual number, but it is likely higher than 5G.

It should be possible to calculate based on the speed with which the heli changes direction. The Wall would be a good move to use for calculations, as you can determine the time going from full forward speed to stopped.

As far as the AOB question, I've seen 90-class helis doing sustained funnels at angles greater than 75 degrees.

Leif

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
03-09-2008 06:34 PM  10 years agoPost 10
QueeQueg

rrVeteran

West Texas

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

I've seen a measured 8G max on a Joker with an FDR that had an accelerometer function. These spikes came during hard reverse collective movements.

8Gs is enough to make the heli appear like it's going to come apart.

PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR  Quote
03-09-2008 09:38 PM  10 years agoPost 11
aerton

rrVeteran

Longueuil, QC, Canada

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Thanks for the info.
8G. That's interesting. That's about what i was thinking.
Just merely thinking about it 1g is ~10m/s^2, which I believe is about 33feet/sec^2, like an acceleration of a "free fall". To get 2G it should accellerate up just like a free fall, 3G should be 2 times faster than free fall and going up. Which already seams pretty powerful to me.

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
WATCH
 1 page 671 views POST REPLY
HomeAircraftHelicopterMain Discussion › Curious, What's the max G rating helis endure in those 3D flights?
 Print TOPIC  Make Suggestion 

 5  Topic Subscribe

Saturday, June 23 - 8:59 pm - Copyright © 2000-2018 RunRyder   EMAILEnable Cookies

Login Here
 New Subscriptions 
 Buddies Online