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03-05-2008 03:30 AM  10 years agoPost 1
Disciple4123

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USA

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03-05-2008 06:31 AM  10 years agoPost 2
rroback

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Irvine (UCI), Ca

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a last generation Macbook Pro. The best you can get for graphics, and in a nice sturdy design.

Rhett..... I can't fly, but the Profi sure can.

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03-05-2008 07:44 AM  10 years agoPost 3
Badllarma

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North West UK

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I've not long go ta Dell Inspiron 1720 and love it nice 17" glossy screen 2 x 120 gig hardrives and 2 gig of ram works well for me.

Just out of interest what is the input you use to get the down link video signal in? I've just had 3 weeks of pratting around with a Pinnacle Hybrid Express card without any look (returned 2 cards).

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03-05-2008 08:05 AM  10 years agoPost 4
rroback

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Irvine (UCI), Ca

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I use eyetv hybrid.

Rhett..... I can't fly, but the Profi sure can.

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03-05-2008 01:09 PM  10 years agoPost 5
Hogster

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Surrey, UK

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Another vote for the Macbook Pro Their screens now use LED backlights (very uniform and bright) and you can get superb battery life out of them - >4 hours depending on usage

Btw, all Macs can dual boot into Windows now - all you need is the Windows installer disk ...

http://www.apple.com/macbookpro/

David

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03-05-2008 05:20 PM  10 years agoPost 6
Disciple4123

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03-05-2008 05:28 PM  10 years agoPost 7
Hogster

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Surrey, UK

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I haven't used the latest version of the Mac operating system, but I believe one of it's (many) main features is allowing the user to very easily boot into XP/Vista. I'm using the previous version of the operatings system and used a beta version of the Windows installation software to create the Windows partition on my hard drive, and it all went very smoothly. Just select whether you want to start up in Windows or MacOS and hit restart. For all intents and purposes it will behave just like a PC - it's most useful! I use it for running the PhoenixRC simulator and also various bits of software for my Uni work.

All the screens Apple use tend to be very good quality, particularly on their iMacs. The laptop screens are very good too - see if you can find a store local to you to try one out! I'm sure you'll love it the moment you set eyes on it

I think that small white Mac you saw was the Mac Mini ... branded as a very cheap way to get into the world of Macs by allowing you to use your current PC monitor, keyboard and mouse with it ...

David

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03-05-2008 05:29 PM  10 years agoPost 8
AceBird

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Utica, NY USA

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Btw, all Macs can dual boot into Windows now - all you need is the Windows installer disk ...
Band-aiding a system to run two different operating systems would not be my first choice. That is always a compromise. Maybe it is Mac’s way of letting a Mac owner use Windows so they get a bad taste for it.

Anyhow before giving any advice on purchasing a computer it would be necessary to know what your processing requirements are instead of your wish lists. Laptops are very confining which doesn’t give you much in the way of ad-ons for the future like a desk top does. Video is a huge processing hog. If all you are looking for is still pics then the cheapest no-named laptop from Walmart would do the trick. For any graphics a stand alone monitor is best that doesn’t run from a varying power source like a laptop. If you have the bucks a purely digital monitor is used for critical applications but be prepared to shell out thousands of dollars for these type of monitors.

Ace
What could be more fun?

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03-05-2008 05:32 PM  10 years agoPost 9
vrwired

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Boulder County, CO

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You may want to look at the XPS line of laptops at dell..
They offer the high res lcd your looking for(WUXGA).. They are the higher end laptops from Dell. The Dell Precisions are pretty nice also (just bought one for a staff member where I work). She wanted WInXP and not Vista.. Dell is still selling the Precision laptops with WinXP installed at the moment. She was so happy.

Make sure you get lots of ram.. the Core 2 Duo processors are sweet. And also make sure you get a 7200 rpm drive.. 5400 bogs.

Then again.. ditto on the new Macbook Pros.. Nice machines.

Actually now that I have seen this post, it is reminding me that I too need an upgrade!

JR GSR260 - Mark IV Cam Mount
Trex 600NSP
Trex 600 to 700 Stretch
Trex 450SE
Hornet X3D

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03-05-2008 05:33 PM  10 years agoPost 10
Hogster

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Surrey, UK

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Actually because Macs use Intel chips now, Windows has full usage of all the Mac's hardware .... so I doubt you would see much difference in performance over an *actual* PC, that's why it's been such a popular move.

I don't know of many areas where PCs excel over Macs, except in the range of software available. But even then, the larger software companies like Adobe all port their software to both Mac and PC ... what sort of software were you considering using?

David

PS. Be warned, once you've tasted the 'light side' you won't want to go back

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03-05-2008 08:27 PM  10 years agoPost 11
kookboy

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Vancouver, BC

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Band-aiding a system to run two different operating systems would not be my first choice. That is always a compromise. Maybe it is Mac’s way of letting a Mac owner use Windows so they get a bad taste for it.
I've been at IBM working with servers/laptops/desktops for quite some time.

I've always been a PC/linux guy until I went and picked up a mac.

The dual-boot system is not a band-aid.

Running dual-boot Mac OS/XP or Vista is not a handicap.

Both OS's use the full extent of the hardware in both the mac desktops and laptops.

It's the best thing since sliced bread.

I work with people that will never own a mac because they hold some kind of loyalty to PC's. I find that ridiculous.

The ability to use 100% hardware resources on one computer via 2 separate OS platforms and have cross-file format ability is amazing and is a huge leap for photo/video editing depending on your software used on either system.

Back to the first post.

I wouldn't recommend a macbook for a main editing system, especially for video processing.

They are good for processing in-field so long as you max out the ram and have some scratch HD's.

Jesse

... But honey it was only $$$

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03-05-2008 08:33 PM  10 years agoPost 12
rroback

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Irvine (UCI), Ca

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There are a number of options to run windows on a mac. You can use bootcamp, which boots into windows, and fully makes you feel on a windows machine. You can also use Parallels (which is what I have) that allows me to run windows programs, while hiding the actual windows desktop, or in such a way that completely masks mac OS X off. I can run xp, and it seems to run as fast as my girlfriend's vaio. The computer you likely saw was a lower end macbook, or ibook. The macbookpro is aluminum.

Rhett..... I can't fly, but the Profi sure can.

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03-05-2008 09:44 PM  10 years agoPost 13
AceBird

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Utica, NY USA

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I work with people that will never own a mac because they hold some kind of loyalty to PC's. I find that ridiculous.
People are loyal to PC's because they are manufactured by multiple companies and the guts can be sourced from hundreds more. I don't like the confines of one single source and limited third party software.

Until you push a system you don't know what the performance is or isn't. Just going to a laptop is a degrade in processing performance.

Ace
What could be more fun?

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03-06-2008 01:38 AM  10 years agoPost 14
TCGliderguy

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Albuquerque, New Mexico

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>People are loyal to PC's because they are manufactured by multiple companies and the guts can be sourced from hundreds more. I don't like the confines of one single source and limited third party software.

Until you push a system you don't know what the performance is or isn't. Just going to a laptop is a degrade in processing performance.<

Acebird.... Once again, there is just no beginning to your wisdom and knowledge..... and it is amazing how you can display it in so many different venues around here....

-TC

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03-06-2008 01:59 AM  10 years agoPost 15
xcellgasman101

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WOODWARD, OKLA....

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Acebird.... Once again, there is just no beginning to your wisdom and knowledge..... and it is amazing how you can display it in so many different venues around here....
Good one Taylor.... He's a jack of all trades, But Master of Nothing,,

John Crotts
www.soonerhelicamproductions.com

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03-06-2008 02:10 AM  10 years agoPost 16
Disciple4123

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03-06-2008 03:01 AM  10 years agoPost 17
ErichF

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Sutton, NH

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The field laptop of choice for professionals and the military is the Panasonic Toughbook line.

At work we have three CF-29s and one CF-74. The CF-74 is the candy machine. When not being used to fly UAVs, it's in the shop connected to a 42" plasma running G3.5 at full res All our machines have touchscreens and sunlight readable.

These machines are ruggedized to the highest Mil-Spec standards. The neat thing about Toughbooks is that you don't need a laptop case...they are their own case with handle and magnesium alloy outer frame and chassis.

The only downside to these machines as the cost. A well equipped CF-74 with touchscreen is nearly $2800.

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03-06-2008 03:28 AM  10 years agoPost 18
Disciple4123

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03-06-2008 03:48 AM  10 years agoPost 19
TCGliderguy

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Albuquerque, New Mexico

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>When I was a kid, in the late 80's Apples, as they were called then, were a joke. They were designed for a fifth grader to use, and IBM's were "business machines." I am sure things have come a long way, but I am still weary. Anyone recall the "Apple" (mac) of years back? Howcome no off brand makes Mac's clone? I am not trying to be arrogant, just want to get a better feel for how the PC's are still around if they are potentially not competitive.<

I've been making my living with Macs since 1985..... desktop publishing, photo editing, video production, and I edit/design/produce a quarterly 128 page magazine on a Mac. So, yes... I am somewhat biased....

The reason that Mac clones no longer exist (they did about 12 years ago, when John Sculley, the former head of Pepsi was CEO...) is that Apple has managed to keep a tight grip on their operating system. Every Mac program that you open has the same interface, same menu bars, etc.... and as a result, you can move from program to program very seamlessly. And by keeping control of the operating system (and thus the developers), the door has been pretty well kept closed on the virus/worm/trojan horse crowd. I've never owned a virus protection program for a Mac. I don't need one....

When Mac OS X came on the scene (built on a Unix backbone), the Mac moved "to the head of the class". Unix is the operating system that the big kids use.. to run huge databases, enterprise servers, etc. Banks, insurance companies, corporate America in general, runs Unix. Mac OS X puts a very user friendly graphical interface (GUI) between the user, and the Unix operating system.

So what does this mean to the end user?.... The system is pretty much bullet proof. I leave my two primary Macs on 24/7 (One is a 733 mHz G4 that I use for "business" stuff... e-mail, web browsing, Photoshop work, magazine layout, etc.... the other is a Dual Processor 1.8 gHz G5... that is strictly dedicated to video editing with FinalCut Pro, and 2D animation (Adobe AfterEffects) and 3d animation (Cinema4D). Both machines run... and run.... and run.. I never have to reboot. No "blue screen of death"... No "fatal error", etc.

All of that said, I'm a realist. There are a lot of programs that are not available on the Mac platform. QuickBooks Pro, for example... yes, Intuit offers a "Mac version. It's a watered down piece of garbage. I never understood that. QuickBooks is a databaswe program. The complicated part is all of the bookkeeping functions, tax functions, etc., that they already have worked out.
Anyway... I run QuickBooks on the Windows XP side of my MacBook Pro.
And my Phoenix flight simulator... and my EagleTree telemetry stuff... and my CastleCreations speed controller software... and my CNC foam cutter and CNC router. All of these PC programs run seamlessly on the Windows side of the Mac.

To do this, you have to have one of the newer Macs with the Intel processor. Then you have a couple of options... The OS X software comes with a utility called Boot Camp. You do a quick install, and that allows you to install Windows XP... or Vista. (yes... you do have to buy a legit copy of Windows...) Once installed, when you boot the computer, you hold down the Option key, and a window pops up, asking you which operating system you want to use. Click the arrow keys to select what you want... and the machine boots accordingly.

Another option is to buy a $90 program called Parallels. That allows you to switch... on the fly... between Mac OS X and Windows. You can even copy and paste stuff between similar programs on the separate operating systems. And you can have an OS X window and a Windows window open... side by side. The down side of this is that there is a bit of a performance hit when running the dual systems. I'm perfectly happy with the BootCamp option... I know what I will be doing when I boot the machine, and it isn't that big of a deal to reboot if my needs change. (Disclaimer - You DO need virus protection on the Windows side of a Macbook Pro. Windows is Windows)

I scoffed at Acebird's comments... because I know that the Macbook Pro's are some of the fastest machines out there... of ANY size.
I have several friends who edit full 1920 x 1280 HD video on Macbooks... The TV show "Scrubs" is edited on Macbooks on airliners flying from L.A. to the East Coast. (Both editors live on the east coast, but commute to L.A. where the show is produced...)

There have been a number of benchmark tests where Windows applications have actually run faster on a Mac than on a similarly spec'ed PC....

The Mac market share is growing all the time. (particularly with the release of the best marketing program Apple ever devised.... it's called "Vista". Sure, the Mac is more money... but so is a Porsche.
If a Ford Fiesta suits your needs.. go for it. But I don't think you will ever regret buying a Macbook Pro. Do yourself a favor, and at least go look at them at an Apple store.....

Thus endeth today's sermon....

Go in Peace!

-Taylor

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03-06-2008 05:33 AM  10 years agoPost 20
duff

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Calgary, Alberta, Canada

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If your going to run windows on a MAC then just go for a PC notebook. Why pay the premium for the Apple name when your not even going to utilize the most powerful part of the mac... the OS. You can get more powerful hardware on a PC for the same price as the MAC.

With that said if you wish to go for windows then the one I would recommend is the Asus G2s-B2.

The following site has specs and prices in Canadian. "very close to American right now"

http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/PID-MX19511(ME).aspx

With vid editing you need ONLY a decent video card and a wicked processor. Video editing is very processor Dependant.

Asus is a Tier 1 vendor for many PC components. You will find their hardware in almost any computer manufactures computer at some time. It comes with a 2 year international warranty that INCLUDES a one time Accidental damage feature. Dropped your notebook? send it in for a new one. Turn around times for Asus repair is typically 1 week if you deal direct.

From what you have stated I think this notebook would be your best bet.

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