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HomeAircraftHelicopterAerial Photography and Video › Camera settings for AP
02-05-2008 08:55 PM  10 years agoPost 21
kookboy

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Vancouver, BC

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Are you moving around quite a bit while depressing the shutter ?

Jesse

... But honey it was only $$$

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02-05-2008 09:05 PM  10 years agoPost 22
Jesper

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Sweden

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Well, the heli hasn't been perfectly still due to some gusty wind conditions, but you would think that out of maybe 100 pictures at least one should be okay - but no, they all look like this...

May be there is something I can do with the Askman mount? The shocks used to stabilize the camera seem to be very light (moves very easily), but at the same time I haven't seen the camera swinging during hovering...

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02-05-2008 11:42 PM  10 years agoPost 23
Hogster

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Surrey, UK

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Hmm from the looks of it that was taken in very poor lighting conditions. I think many cameras would have struggled ....

Can you upload the original image somewhere? It will contain information about the camera's settings like shutter speed, aperture size and ISO speed which are useful pieces of information when trying to isolate the cause of the poor image quality ...

Thanks,

David

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02-06-2008 06:00 PM  10 years agoPost 24
AceBird

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Utica, NY USA

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The blur appears to be more up and down than left and right. Did you balance the rig after you added the mount? If it is nose or tail heavy the heli is going to hop with every swipe of the blade. You might not be able to see this visibly when you look at the heli in flight. If the rig has tilt ability there may be some slop in the linkage. A light torsion spring or rubber band might put enough of a load on that axis to keep the slop in one direction.

Ace
What could be more fun?

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02-06-2008 09:55 PM  10 years agoPost 25
talk the torque

rrApprentice

SA

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Jesper

Send us some photos of your rig

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02-07-2008 10:43 PM  10 years agoPost 26
Jesper

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Sweden

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Thanks for you guys taking an intrest in my problem. I have been away from home for a few days, be back home tomorrow.

Hogster,

I found the information you where talking about, and as it turns out, the shutter value wasn't what it was supposed to be (turned out to be anything between 1/25 to 1/50!). I didn't realize that the automatic flash had to be turned off. When it's on the shutter speed will be 1/500 or longer. After turning it off, I went out to try to take some more pictures (camera not on the heli). I tried shutter speeds from 1/500 to 1/1600 and apatures varying from 2.8 to 5.6. The result was some very "dark" pictures. In order to get some okay pictures, I had increase the shutter to about 1/50 (the weather in Sweden this time of year is almost always overcast). It seems to me that it would be almost impossible to take AP pictures in reduced lighting conditions such as when the sky is overcast? Remember that I am a complete idiot when it comes to cameras, so I may very well be doing something wrong!

Acebird,

Are you saying that if the heli dosen't balance on the main shaft, it will oscillate back and forth with every revolution of the rotor?
My rig, not being a 100% complete, is tailheavey. I thought that this would only be a problem to me when the rig is rotating, causing the CG of the heli as a whole to change, requiering some corrective cyclic inputs to maintain a stationary hover?

My rig has adjustable tilt. I will check the belt for any slop that might allow the camera to move.

talk the torque,

Since I am not home, I can't take any detailed pictures of my rig. However, I have one picture of the heli in my laptop. Don't know if it helps but here it is.

Thanks again,

Jesper

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02-07-2008 10:56 PM  10 years agoPost 27
Hogster

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Surrey, UK

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Hey Jesper,

Try setting the dial on your camera to 'Tv', then set the shutter speed to around 1/400s (the slowest I've ever gone down to), and take a photo or two. If they come out dark, try increasing the value of the ISO in steps until the photo is properly exposed. In overcast conditions you will need to use a higher ISO. In really low-light I've used ISO 400 but you will see a fair amount of noise in the images at that speed .... I try not to use it if I can avoid it.

It is ESSENTIAL that your helicopter balances when supported from the main shaft (ie. lifting the helicopter by the blade grips). If it's tail heavy as you say, then the whole time the rotors are spinning, they are having to change their angle to provide more lift at the back than they are at the front. Move components around until the heli remains level when you pick it up by the blade grips ....

All the best and let us know how it goes!

Cheers,

David

PS. That's a nice looking rig you've got there!

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02-07-2008 11:00 PM  10 years agoPost 28
Jesper

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Sweden

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Great stuff! Hopefully I'll have some better weather conditions this weekend, so I can give it another try.

Thanks,

Jesper

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02-08-2008 07:57 AM  10 years agoPost 29
CKY

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Sunshine Coast, BC, Canada

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I beg to differ, go to aperture priority set to the smallest number, 2.8 or better (smaller), set ISO to a bigger number, might as well go to the max.

With those settings you may get a picture. Setting the shutter to a fast setting will not work as you will run out of aperture. Setting aperture to full open you will at least get some sort of picture.

You cannot run out of shutter speed, low side at least, but aperture opening is limited to the lens used. The bigger ISO number will give a grainy picture but allow a faster shutter.

Remember, you cannot make a silk purse out of a sow's ear, just like you cannot have a fast shutter speed with low light.

Chris

PS...you may have to work on your mount. Looks like a verticle vibration problem.

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02-08-2008 03:04 PM  10 years agoPost 30
Hogster

rrKey Veteran

Surrey, UK

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Sorry I don't follow your logic

A fast shutter speed is the key to getting clear photographs! In low light when the camera is set to Tv mode, the camera WILL choose the largest aperture possible!

That's why I suggested he did some ground tests to see how the images will turn out.

1) Set the camera to Tv mode
2) Set the shutter speed to the minimum you will allow for blur-free photos (I suggest 1/400s as a minimum)
3) Take a few test photos
4) If it's too dark, increase the ISO by a stop or two (eg. from ISO 50 to 100, or 100 to 200, or 200 to 400 etc)

If you still can't get a correctly exposed image then you can start decreasing the shutter speed ... but the more you decrease it, the more chance you will have of blurred photos.

See how you get on anyway

David

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02-08-2008 05:31 PM  10 years agoPost 31
AceBird

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Utica, NY USA

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Are you saying that if the heli dosen't balance on the main shaft, it will oscillate back and forth with every revolution of the rotor?
Essentially yes, the more unbalanced the heli is the more cyclic is needed to counteract the unbalanced condition. Cyclic is a pulsating force by nature. Cyclic is smoothed out somewhat by the mass (inertia) of the helicopter / mount, the heavier the mass the more the smoothing. Depending on how rigid the mount is to the helicopter the two masses could act together or oscillate at different frequencies.

What I would do is intentionally balance the heli a little nose heavy. Then with a small weight that is clamped to the boom you can try different positions down the boom until you get the smoothest photo in a hover. At some point the nose heavy condition will be eliminated and be perfectly balanced which should give you the sharpest photo (in theory). Of course there could be some unbalanced condition that exist left and right that appears as up and down in the photo because of the structure of the mount and how the oscillations propagate. But in your photo there is a definite up and down motion present so I would attack that axis first.

Ace
What could be more fun?

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02-08-2008 07:36 PM  10 years agoPost 32
CKY

rrVeteran

Sunshine Coast, BC, Canada

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Sunny 16 rule

Should explain some camera setting issues

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