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Home🌌Off Topics🌌Off Topics Main Discussion › TWO MOONS ON 27 AUGUST!
08-03-2007 12:31 PM  13 years ago
Rotor

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Springfield, MO USA

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I have a street light outside my bedroom window that each and every night appears to me to be as bright as the sun...My motto is this..Fly...Rebuild...Fly
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08-03-2007 06:11 PM  13 years ago
Ed Moore

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West Sussex, UK

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It really upsets me that there are people in a western society that manage to get through an education system yet still believe this stuff. There's a problem somewhere.
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08-03-2007 06:27 PM  13 years ago
Furious Predator

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Kitchener, Ontario, Canada

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you know whats really weird?
if you get to see a huge moon on the horizon...and you try to take a pic of it...the moon looks like a little dot in the pic!!!!

i know its optics, but i cant remember the explanation of why it looks bigger to the eye then the cammera.
Shawn
Team Leisure-Tech
Team HelixRC
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08-03-2007 06:43 PM  13 years ago
GimbalFan (RIP)

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Big Coppitt Key, FL

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i cant remember the explanation of why it looks bigger to the eye then the cammera
Relative perspective.
op-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-t
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08-03-2007 07:01 PM  13 years ago
Mark C

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Houston, TX - USA

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There is one other effect to take into account on perceiving the size of the moon. And that is the size of your pupil.

During the day, if you see the moon you can easily hold your thumb up and cover it up completely. Your pupil is closed down to it's smallest size.

At night on a full moon, if you hold up your thumb the moon leaks around the edges of it and you can't seem to cover it up. Your pupil is completely dilated.

If you to draw a diagram of your pupil, thumb and moon you would see that when your pupil is at it's smallest your thumb can completely eclipse the image of the moon during the day. At night, with your pupil completely dilated, your thumb is not large enough to eclipse the image of the moon that falls on your pupil.

This effect also affects the way your brain percieves the sizes of objects.

Mark C.
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08-03-2007 07:03 PM  13 years ago
Furious Predator

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Kitchener, Ontario, Canada

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hmmm.....so what is the true size of the moon as we see it then? Shawn
Team Leisure-Tech
Team HelixRC
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08-03-2007 07:08 PM  13 years ago
Mark C

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Houston, TX - USA

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Well..... It's always 238,857 miles away and 2160 miles across.

But on a full moon during the day its smaller than your thumb and at night it's bigger than your thumb. Now ain't that cool?
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08-03-2007 07:10 PM  13 years ago
GimbalFan (RIP)

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Big Coppitt Key, FL

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It's always 238,857 miles away and 2160 miles across.
2160, yes -- 238,857, no -- distance varies by 13% (222k-253k miles +/-).
op-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-t
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08-03-2007 07:14 PM  13 years ago
RayJayJohnsonJr

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Midwest

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This post isn't complete B.S. It's a hold over from August 27 2005, when Mars WAS at it's closest point to Earth for some eons to come. It just was never 'put to bed'. I was at the ORRO (Owatonna Rotary Ring Out - Owatonna MN) that evening watching the night flying and took time to gaze over my shoulder and marvel at the once in a lifetime view of the red planet. It was pretty cool.

-Mark
There, their and they're. It's really that simple.
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08-03-2007 07:14 PM  13 years ago
Mark C

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Houston, TX - USA

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2160 yes -- 238,857 no.
Naaaaaa. You just think it's elliptical. I actually have a cable tied to it.
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08-03-2007 07:17 PM  13 years ago
GimbalFan (RIP)

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Big Coppitt Key, FL

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I actually have a cable tied to it.
RG6 or Cat5?
op-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-t
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08-03-2007 07:19 PM  13 years ago
Mark C

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Houston, TX - USA

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RG6 or Cat5?
Neither. It's actually constructed from crashed raptor 50 tail belts from my last 4 years of flying.

Mark C.
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08-03-2007 07:22 PM  13 years ago
GimbalFan (RIP)

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Big Coppitt Key, FL

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253 million crashes? 174,000 a DAY?? Wow -- datsa lotta biege linguini.op-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-t
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08-03-2007 08:00 PM  13 years ago
drksky

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Bloomington, Illinois

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There is one other effect to take into account on perceiving the size of the moon. And that is the size of your pupil.
Actually, the size of your pupil has nothing to do with how big the moon appears. The only thing that your pupils affect is how much light reaches the interior of your eye. It works just like (well sort of) the aperture setting on a camera lens.

If your pupil affected how big objects looked, objects you're looking at would be getting bigger and smaller all the time.

How big things appear is a function of the focal length of the lens of your eye, as well as camera lenses. This is easy to see in a zoom camera lens. On a 28-70mm zoom, the same object viewed from the same distance would look bigger at 70mm than it would at 28mm. The longer the focal length, the larger the apparent size of the focused object.

Again, day or night, horizon or overhead, the moon covers 1/2 of a degree of sky.
AIM & Yahoo IM: drksky1056
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08-03-2007 08:27 PM  13 years ago
Mark C

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Houston, TX - USA

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This is only true if your lens is perfect. Which it is not. That is why the moon appears to "leak" around your thumb. It is due to the deformaties and imperfections of your lens.

Try it.
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08-03-2007 08:40 PM  13 years ago
maxpower097

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none

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The moon will be way way bigger then mars in any event. At the largest mars will appear to be a large red star. Still it will be big for mars. But tiny on a moon scale. Another little thing when veiwing planets and stars is that Stars twinkle, planets stay solid. So when you go out star veiwing thats how you can tell the difference between Mars, Venus, Saturn, and a star.
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08-03-2007 08:44 PM  13 years ago
caseyjholmes

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Portland, Oregon

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The moon will never look the same size as mars. I've seen that before, and it IS a load of crock. I know for a fact that mars is one of the harder planets to observe, and is very small. (looks mainly like a bright star with a red hue)

Saturn and Jupiter are the brightest things in the sky when they are out and the moon is down. You can tell for sure when you are looking at them. Mars is alot harder to know for sure you are looking at it.

If any planet were to look as big as the moon one day, It would more likely be jupiter or saturn, even though they are much further away.
If you ever see mars as big as the moon, it's likely that we are all in big trouble..

Spoken from an astrophotographer. even in a fair sized telescope (12" ) , mars is still relatively small. (mostly depending on the focal point of the scope)
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08-03-2007 09:04 PM  13 years ago
MattJen

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UK

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wow you guys are so lucky,

where i live n the uk 20 miles from London, no such chance of seeing any minor constellations.

I went to telescope course and one of the guys had just come back from PURU - he said we are robbed in the northern hemisphere when it comes to interesting objects to look at, he took his Mead ETX70 and said with the naked eye you can see purples,oranges and plenty of other colours of other galaxies and gasious clouds.

all i could do was think WOW, in the coutryside which is about 65 miles in a valley i just make out the mist of the milkyway,

I just got rid of Mead gps LX200 GPS 10" i could make out the polar caps on mars just about - could see the white top.

Like most of you i love astronomy i wish i had more time!!

I think it is now this time of year we enter the regular meteor shower - i have forgotten the name - i vagualy remember the name the cyclades -

Matt
All The Best
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08-04-2007 02:05 PM  13 years ago
maxpower097

rrApprentice

none

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When mars is at its closest like coming up in august mars is actually pretty bright. I remember when it came close about 10 years ago. It acutally looks like a major star. Its really easy to see too. Just look for the big red star that doesn't twinkle. But there are still some other stars that will be brighter. But it is bright for mars. And also I thought venus was alot brighter to us then jupiter..?..? I used to be an amature astronomer too.
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08-05-2007 07:00 AM  13 years ago
drksky

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Bloomington, Illinois

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Venus is a lot brighter than Jupiter. Venus being about -4 on average (it varies a little depending on how close it is) and Jupiter being about -2. Here's a good page that gives some perspective:
http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/icq/MagScale.html
AIM & Yahoo IM: drksky1056
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