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Home🌌Off Topics🌌Off Topics Main Discussion › TWO MOONS ON 27 AUGUST!
08-03-2007 04:12 AM  13 years ago
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deepdiver8055

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TWO MOONS ON 27 AUGUST!
*Two Moons on 27 August*

*27th Aug the Whole World is waiting for.............*

Planet Mars will be the brightest in the night sky starting August.

It will look as large as the full moon to the naked eye. This will culminate on Aug. 27 when Mars comes within 34.65M miles of earth. Be sure to watch the sky on Aug. 27 12:30 am midnight. It will look like the earth has 2 moons. The next time Mars may come this much closer in 2287.

Share this with your friends as NO ONE ALIVE TODAY will ever see it again.

Be sure to check this out!.
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08-03-2007 04:14 AM  13 years ago
Gearhead

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sounds cool, I would like to see that, but boy the nuts are going to be out !!

Jim
Jim
Buzz Buzz Buzz
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08-03-2007 04:19 AM  13 years ago
Sealerman

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It will look as large as the full moon to the naked eye. This will culminate on Aug. 27 when Mars comes within 34.65M miles of earth. Be sure to watch the sky on Aug. 27 12:30 am midnight. It will look like the earth has 2 moons.
Does anyone really believe that Mars will look as big as the moon?
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08-03-2007 04:23 AM  13 years ago
deepdiver8055

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dont know, this was sent to me but I just dont know about this. It could if it gets close enough. LOL
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08-03-2007 04:28 AM  13 years ago
GimbalFan (RIP)

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From Earth, Mars at its closest appears to be approximately 1/50th (2%) the width of the Moon. This ratio will likely continue for thousands of centuries. It'll never appear to be more than about 1% as bright as the Moon.op-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-t
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08-03-2007 04:52 AM  13 years ago
46Taylorcraft

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AZ

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this is a hoax that has been bouncing around the net for years.

if someone actually believed that mars would appear to be half as large as the moon then I would like to sell them a beautiful oceanside piece of property here in Arizona.
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08-03-2007 04:55 AM  13 years ago
Sealerman

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It is sad to know that there are so many idiots out there.
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08-03-2007 05:33 AM  13 years ago
midwestpilot

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Crystal Lake, IL

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hey with out the idiots
who would buy all the Chia pets?
In life there is no spacebar!

Rich Erikson AMA 6175
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08-03-2007 05:42 AM  13 years ago
Furious Predator

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not only this....but atleast in my part of the sky, the planet Venus has been the brightest object in the sky for a while now, your not going to get a lot brighter then that.

a few years ago Jupiter was pretty close, and was extremely bright and big...i didn't know what it was till i got the telescope out.
Shawn
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08-03-2007 06:14 AM  13 years ago
drksky

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In order of decreasing brightness...

Sun
Moon
Venus
Jupiter
Saturn
Mars
Mercury
Uranus
Neptune
Pluto

Not quite sure about Mercury. It's not seen in full darkness cause it's so close to the sun, so it's always in some amount of twilight.

To the naked eye, the planets never really appear "bigger" because their angular size is so small (the moon and the sun are both about 1/2 degree across). However, you can usually tell a planet from a star because the stars will appear to flicker (because of atmospheric turbulence) and the planet won't, because it does have a greater angular size than a star, which is, for all intents and purposes, a point source.

I don't know why I typed all that. I tend to gas on when it comes to astronomy.
AIM & Yahoo IM: drksky1056
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08-03-2007 07:02 AM  13 years ago
Furious Predator

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i love astronomy

i used to live in Nova Scotia, no city lights. closest city was over 2 hours away. we would go up on top of one of the mountains in the valley where it was even darker, and you were in clearer air. bring out the telescope, and just look for hours on end. the sky would be filled, not one blank spot, you coudl clearly see the milkyway, planets, other galaxies....and best of all....i lived in nova scotia while Hale Bopp was making its pass.

god i miss it there
Shawn
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08-03-2007 07:30 AM  13 years ago
GimbalFan (RIP)

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Hale Bopp -- wasn't that a pop hit by bubble gum band Hanson awhile back?op-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-thwop-t
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08-03-2007 08:14 AM  13 years ago
Dood

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I don't know how to explain this as I am no astronomer.

I remember seeing the moon on just one occasion 15 years ago or so.
As it was rising a few degrees over the horizon, the thing looked absolutely HUGE!

Im trying to put it in some kind of perspective, but it apeared about 10 times larger than what it normally does, or I'd say about the size of a quarter less than 6 inches in front of your face.

It was quite a site. I suppose it had something to do with the earth's atmosphere.

As for Mars, I have seen it a few times. Through the naked eye, it never looked any bigger than a regular star. Just a bit brighter though.
I also saw Venus a few nights about 12 years ago. Was probably 1/10 the size of the moon, but really damn bright.

Now MAYBE, with the HUGE moon I saw years ago, for reasons I don't know, might there be some sorta similar effect that we might see with Mars? I doubt it would look as big as the moon, but I won't shoot any speculation down untill I see if for myself.
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08-03-2007 08:16 AM  13 years ago
Mr Fluffy

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Snopes to the rescue

http://www.snopes.com/science/mars.asp


of course it's the same helicopter love. Would I lie to you ?
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08-03-2007 10:32 AM  13 years ago
drksky

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Im trying to put it in some kind of perspective, but it apeared about 10 times larger than what it normally does, or I'd say about the size of a quarter less than 6 inches in front of your face.
That's an optical illusion. If you were to measure the angular size at the horizon and again overhead, there would be no difference in its size. Here's a quite long, but thorough description of why this happens:
http://facstaff.uww.edu/mccreadd/
AIM & Yahoo IM: drksky1056
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08-03-2007 10:43 AM  13 years ago
Dood

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drksky,

I agree with you for the most part, and I buy the optical illusion theory FOF MOST CASES.

I really do agree that the moon looks larger on the horizon.
Not the moon I saw one particular night, though.

It literally appeared to be about 10 times larger than what it NORMALLY does on the horizon. I think a better idea for size comparison is my fist right in front of my face.
On top of that, it had an awesome reddish yellow glow to it, perfectly clear sky. I was able to see details on the moon's surface that previously I could only see with a telescope.

I wish I had a picture, as it might have been a once in a lifetime event.
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08-03-2007 11:09 AM  13 years ago
drksky

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Perception aside, the fact remains that the moon was not really any bigger or closer at that horizon than when it is overhead, nor was there some sort of magnifying effect of the atmosphere.

It's all a function of the scene's perspective. That is to say, viewed from one location the next, perspective would change how big the moon appears on the horizon depending on what objects and shapes are in the foreground. As that article suggests, if you were to take a double-exposure photograph of the moon at the horizon and again two hours later, the photograph would show the moon as the same size, regardless of how it appeared to your eye. Yes, the effect can be quite dramatic, depending on the overall scene, but if you were to block out the foreground elements somehow, it would look its normal size.

The reddish coloration was due to more fine particulates being in the air, and the fact that at the horizon, you are looking through much more of the atmosphere than when looking overhead. This is commonly seen in farm country during the fall because of all the extra dust that gets put into the air by the farmers bringing in their crops. Hence the expression, "Harvest Moon".

As far as you being able to see details that you would have been able to see with a telescope, I think your imagination was getting the better of you. Because of the illusion that the moon was bigger or closer, you thought you were able to see more detail, but I doubt that was the case. You would need a good pair of binoculars to start seeing things like craters and mountains.

A good friend of mine and I have gone round and round on this subject for years, and despite any documentation or demontrations, he still argues that it not only "looks bigger", it IS bigger.

Try an experiment: On a piece of paper, draw two rectangles of identical size, one on top of the other, separated by about three inches. Use a ruler if you have to. Then, pick a point a couple of inches above the top rectangle and draw two lines that diverge from that point to extend below the bottom rectangle, one of either side. Once the lines are drawn, the top rectangle will _appear_ to be larger, but you KNOW it's not. This is a similar illusion, cause by the perspective created by the converging lines.

Here's something similar I whipped up in Paint. It's not as dramatic, and would probably work better with thicker lines...

AIM & Yahoo IM: drksky1056
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08-03-2007 11:27 AM  13 years ago
Dood

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the moon illusion THEORY.

The reddish color, or "harvest moon" is correct. This was in the late summer or early fall in Wisoconsin, if I remember.

I saw it within a few blocks from my home. why I can say is that there WAS something going on, is that I have seen the SAME MOON (yes, there is only one ) set numerous, numerous times from the same exact location. I know what the moon is supposed to look like, and how big it normally appears.

Like I said, this was a one time occurance. I'd never seen it twice, and might never again. As it is obviously a RARE occurance, I suppose very few people have seen similar occurances.

I know what I saw, and I won't change my mind on what I saw.

I won't attempt to disprove a UFO sighting either, untill I see it with my own eyes.
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08-03-2007 11:43 AM  13 years ago
drksky

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Bloomington, Illinois

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the moon illusion THEORY.
Theory or no, the fact remains that the physical properties of the moon, nor the atmosphere, changed. The moon was in its same orbit, the same relative distance from the earth. The atmosphere does NOT act as a magnifier, but it will act as a prism that gives the moon and the sun a somewhat squashed appearance when on the horizon.

Here is another page that descibes the illusion, including a multi-exposure photo like I mentioned above which I think pretty well proves the point:
http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y...oonillusion.htm

My point is still valid.
AIM & Yahoo IM: drksky1056
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08-03-2007 12:16 PM  13 years ago
drksky

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By the way, on the subject REAL astronomy, this year's Perseid meteor shower is coming up and should be a good one, due to the fact that the moon is new and the skies should be very dark.

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y...eatperseids.htm
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