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05-24-2007 09:19 PM  13 years ago
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rudyy

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E. Amherst, NY

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Shooting Permission
I want to shoot some APs of a golf course nearby my house for making a brochure. Since the golf course is privately owned, should I approach the person to be in charge of the course for the shooting permission first as I think it is not legally right to shoot without the owner's consent?

Rudy
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05-24-2007 09:48 PM  13 years ago
DANNO

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St. Petersburg, Florida

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if you can shoot from public property then you really dont need permission but if youre going to be on the course then you would definatly...www.skypiximaging.com
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05-24-2007 10:15 PM  13 years ago
jeffscholl

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Whitefish, MT

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If your going to use the images for commercial useage you might think about permission and a property release if the course is privately owned/country club.
If it is for editorial use go for it.

Cheers,
Jeff
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05-24-2007 10:56 PM  13 years ago
Rappy 60

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Paris, France

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if you can shoot from public property then you really dont need permission but if youre going to be on the course then you would definatly...
Actually this is incorrect. Just as photography has copyrights, buildings and other landscape features are also covered. For example, taking pictures of the sears towers and publishing it on the cover of forbes would violate the owner of the buildings rights. Usually when photographing known landmarks, the owners permission is usually sought, and a property release is signed between the phtotographer and owner.

Regards,

Dale
Load "*",8,1
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05-25-2007 12:12 AM  13 years ago
rudyy

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E. Amherst, NY

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In follow up, so if I just want to shoot some APs for making my AP brochure, would getting the golf course owner's consent be sufficient without going through the property release?

Rudy
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05-25-2007 02:30 AM  13 years ago
kiwidave1

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Seattle, WA

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It's always a good idea to get everything in writing. If this is for a brochure I think you will be ok without permission providing you follow Danno and Jeff's advice. If you can get permission, better still. If you don't think you will be able to after some general conversation questioning then I think it is always better to ask forgiveness than flying even if someone says no.

Remember that if you fly over a golf course then you will be the biggest target on the range and everyone will be trying to hit you out of the air..

4!!!

David
Never underestimate the power of stupid people in large groups.
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05-25-2007 02:36 AM  13 years ago
gjestico

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Vancouver, B.C.

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http://www.krages.com/ThePhotographersRight.pdf

shoot away. They gonna charge google earth with copyright violation too ? If it was at all possible to prevent such photography hollywood paparazzi would have been shut down long ago.
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05-25-2007 02:47 AM  13 years ago
DANNO

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St. Petersburg, Florida

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good point...i dont recall getting a check or signing a contract with google earth to publically display my house www.skypiximaging.com
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05-25-2007 03:10 AM  13 years ago
Rappy 60

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Paris, France

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shoot away. They gonna charge google earth with copyright violation too
You are correct and incorrect, its a grey area actually.

http://fairuse.stanford.edu/Copyrig...ter12/12-d.html

Read section 2. If in doubt, get the property release. It will avoid legal disputes later on, and money out of your pocket for legal fees.

Here is a news article about one building in NY.

http://nymag.com/nymetro/news/media/features/1463/

Dale
Load "*",8,1
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05-25-2007 03:42 AM  13 years ago
BigguyOz

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Forster, New South Wales, Australia

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Different countries have different laws, but I believe the key issue is whether you are on the property of not. In general, apart from structures which may have specific trademark/copyright, you can basically photograph anything if shooting from public property. But as soon as you are on private property the rights change.

Someone mentioned papparazi - I believe they have won the case when on public land and lost the case when not.

I would always befriend the person in charge of the golf-course first, on the basis that usually people will be cooperative, and if you make it a marketing conversation, you might get paid to do it. If not, just ask if you could snap a few shots for the brochure anyway. You still might get paid if you show the shots later...
Tony Stott
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05-25-2007 03:45 AM  13 years ago
gjestico

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Vancouver, B.C.

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Hmm interesting.
One thing is for certain - In the good old USA, anyone with a lawyer, and the money to set them on you, can have you sued for anything. probably just for being alive.
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05-25-2007 05:45 AM  13 years ago
classic

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All over the place!

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Just ask them if you can provide some free shoots to them for practice, tell them its free and give them a copy of the pics. They wil let you take the shoots.Which is worse, ignorance or apathy? I don't know and I don't care!
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05-25-2007 02:56 PM  13 years ago
aambrose

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Pana, IL

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I would always befriend the person in charge of the golf-course first, on the basis that usually people will be cooperative, and if you make it a marketing conversation, you might get paid to do it. If not, just ask if you could snap a few shots for the brochure anyway. You still might get paid if you show the shots later...
I totally agree with Tony.

We ask permission to shoot our subjects 99% of the time. Most of the time we already have permission by the client. Even if we think it's no biggie, we ask anyway. Same goes for setting up, takeoff, and landing sites.

It's just smart business practice and I think people will respect you more if you're honest up front. It's also a chance to explain to someone what you're doing which could lead to more business. You're less likely to be perceived as someone surreptitiously snapping photos with your "toy helicopter". Professionalism and courtesy usually prevail.

Tony
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05-26-2007 08:37 AM  13 years ago
nikivan

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Vancouver, BC, Canada

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Just ask them if you can provide some free shoots to them for practice, tell them its free and give them a copy of the pics. They wil let you take the shoots.
Even better, charge them for the work. Offer them a discount price and include the property release text in the agreement. If this does not work, find another golf course.
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