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HomeAircraftHelicopterHIROBOOther › Why my engine always get flooded?
11-24-2006 12:46 AM  11 years agoPost 1
rudyy

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E. Amherst, NY

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I just put everything into place of my 2nd Evo50, and I am now in the stage of starting up the engine. Every time I start it, run it for a minute or so, and then stop the engine, I am not able to start it again due to the engine flood. I need to take off the glow plug, flush it with the starter before I can start it again. Yet, it happens again every time the engine stops. Any idea how to solve this issue? Is there something wrong with my fuel line wiring?

Rudy

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11-24-2006 01:25 AM  11 years agoPost 2
dgshaffer

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New Jersey

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It looks normal. How do you keep fuel from pouring out of the third nipple on the header tank when you're refueling?

Just be sure to clip off your supply to the carb after flying. There's pressure in the tank that will keep fuel flowing even though there's no demand.

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11-24-2006 02:19 AM  11 years agoPost 3
balsapro

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Gallatin,TN

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what fuel are you running? coolpower 15. that engine is set up for 30% you might try adjusting the low end for that type of fuel. the fuel line set up would not cause flooding, just mixture setings.

does it gurgle a lot going from idel to full throttle?

Build the Best, Fly the Best, Crash the Best

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11-24-2006 02:23 AM  11 years agoPost 4
chopperman1

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Huntsville, AL

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Yeh there might be somthing with your fuel setup. The tubing from the T connector going to the middle of the header tank should be capped off. There should be nothing in the middle nipple of the tank. This is how many poeple do it. I never saw it the way you have it there

Cliff

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11-24-2006 02:30 AM  11 years agoPost 5
balsapro

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Gallatin,TN

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the middle nipple on the header tank is not open it is closed off. it allows for easy refueling. the fuel pluming is not the prob.

Build the Best, Fly the Best, Crash the Best

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11-24-2006 02:40 AM  11 years agoPost 6
rudyy

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E. Amherst, NY

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Hey balsapro, do you find the heli in the photo look familiar? That is actually your heli with the setup that comes with it. I have sent you a pm.

Rudy

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11-27-2006 04:34 AM  11 years agoPost 7
dkshema

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Cedar Rapids, IA

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Two things come to mind.

First, shut off the fuel line going to the carb using that clamp you've got on there between starts.

Second, make sure you are not filling the main tank too full so that you're getting excess fuel out of the tank vent, into the muffler, and into the crankcase that way.

Dave

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11-27-2006 04:59 AM  11 years agoPost 8
Chopper Man100

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Canton GA.

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This is a common issue for this helicopter. Not a big deal. buy a fuel shut off or clamp for you fuel line that goes to the carb from the tank and shut it when the heli is not running. The fuel will syphone (can't spell) when the fuel tank is maybe higher then half way full.

Also, its very easy to clear out your engine without taking out the glow plug but you have to have a fuel shut off first.

Clearing out engine if it is not hydro locked!.
Most important step -- Step one ****** Most important step ******
Step one, remove the glow starter from the engine if it is not already done!

Step 2, with the glow starter removed, close the fuel shut off

Step 3 open the throttle all the way open, make sure the glow starter is off!

Step 4 pick up the helicopter, lean it towards the exhaust port so the muffler is hangning below the engine and it would be nice to make sure the exhaust outlet is pointing towards the ground, hold it there for a 5 to 10 seconds to make sure you get all the fuel out of the muffler. Also turn the engine by hand to the compressions stroke and then back it off about 1/3 of a turn. you can actually do this before you pick up your heli. Once you are sure that most of the excess fuel is remove, set the heli back down.

Step 5 with the GLOW STARTER REMOVED, spin the engine over with the electric starter with throttle wide open and the fuel shut off. Do that for about 5 seconds. You will probably hear the engine sound change as it is clearing out all the excess fuel.

Step 6 VERY IMPORTANT STEP ---- CLOSE THE THROTTLE TO AN IDLE position

step 7 install glow starter

step 8 open the fuel shut off

step 9 start the engine, it will most likely start right up

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11-27-2006 06:09 AM  11 years agoPost 9
jkelly

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Bedford, PA

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You can just tilt the heli on the muffler side, rotate the fan back and forth with your finger and while it's still tilted start it. Perhaps your header is too high in relation to the carb.

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11-27-2006 11:41 AM  11 years agoPost 10
RayJayJohnsonJr

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Midwest

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Header is definetaly higher than mine. I used the hole for boom support strut. No problems.

-Mark

There, their and they're. It's really that simple.

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11-27-2006 10:18 PM  11 years agoPost 11
balsapro

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Gallatin,TN

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the header is in line with the carb, almost directly. mounting it on the boom support hole allows the header to set to low and gives a rich running engine when inverted. just think about it for a minute if it was higher or lower than the carbes center when you flip things upside down it would have adverse effects on engine performance.

the engine flooding is due to the needles. that engne was set to run on 30 percent, 15 will not work unless adjusting for the differnt nito. i bet the low end is just to rich.

Build the Best, Fly the Best, Crash the Best

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11-28-2006 12:18 AM  11 years agoPost 12
Gary Jenkins

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Nowhere, US

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If you fill the tanks and leave it sit too long the engine will flood. You need too clamp the fuel line off, I know I've done it.

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11-28-2006 12:19 AM  11 years agoPost 13
Chopper Man100

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Canton GA.

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I usually don't even run a header tank on the EVO 50. I never found it to be that much better, just an extra part. I have a header now but don't usually run one, without a header tank, it will flood as well. Really depends on if the outgoing fuel in the line, if the fuel going down the tubing is lower than the level in the tank and the throttle is open a tiny bit or if there is an air escape on the engine side (depending where the piston is, alwaying air to escape the crankcase) it will siphon. If the fuel line is empty and the line runs higher then the top of the fuel tank to there is no fuel in the line to start the siphoning it should not flood. When I fuel mine, after fueling, the line has enough in it to start the siphoning process. Makes it easy to prime engine if needed.

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11-28-2006 12:30 AM  11 years agoPost 14
Chopper Man100

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Canton GA.

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jkelly, my process will take care of all cases of flooding and help clear out any excess liquid with will decrease the possiblity of hydrolocking the engine.

You process will work once the newbie is familar with "how much the engine if flooded". I use you method most of the time if I even have a floolding problem, I figured that I would give a detailed process to cover all bases. With the fuel line clamp, the flooding problem will be eliminated except for the time the we forget to close the clamp which happens once in a while due to CRS.

If the engine is really wet and the crankcase is pretty wet, my process will clear it all out with no worries of getting a slug of liquid after the fuel has been removed off the top of the pistion. It also clears out the muffler a little more so excess fuel doesn't go back into the engine from the muffler if there is to much left in the muffler. Don't forget, the engine can flood by over filling the fuel tank and fuel traving into the muffler from the vent line and on into the engine.

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11-28-2006 08:36 AM  11 years agoPost 15
jkelly

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Bedford, PA

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I understand and I'm sure it works well. I'm just passing on the method that works well for me. I'm sure I've done it your way sometime in the last 11 years but I'm too lazy to lift my machine if it needs the fuel cleared. I rarely have the problem these days but when I do it starts right up after tilting it to the side. I'm all about fast and easy.

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