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Home✈️Aircraft🚁HelicopterCAD - Engineering - Technical › CAD Software Recomendations please...
10-29-2006 06:49 PM  12 years ago
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gyan

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Surrey, BC Canada or Blaine Wa.

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CAD Software Recomendations please...
OK I'm REALLY new at all this. I'm thinking that a way in would be to learn the software first, see if I could make a few virtual parts then go from there. Like why get a CNC machine & have nothing to make with it ? Sooo what is a good industry standard software to get to try my hand at CNC ? I'm looking at user friendly stuff here, I heard that Autocad is not really user friendly. Is it an industry standard though? ANy ideas would be appreciated...thanks
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10-30-2006 12:06 AM  12 years ago
busted blade

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orlando,florida

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if youre starting from scratch and self-taught like i did 5 years ago nothing is going to be "friendly". its gonna be an a$$ kicker and nothing short of complete determination will get you through it. when i started i bought a haas vf3 and bobcad-cam software. i had no cnc machining experience (only some manual experience),no programing experience, and no cad experience. the bobcad came with training cd's and a book. i can remember many long days and lots of caffeine to finally get to the point where i could draw, program, and machine a part without making mistakes. it took probably a year before i could machine complex parts and 3d. the challenges are continual like selecting the best process for machining something,fixtures, efficient programing, feeds and speeds, etc.. the good news is the rewards come quickly and get bigger and better. i really get a lot of satisfaction when i can sit down in front of the screen and design something making it stylish, sexy , and functional, machining it, and putting it into service. so the answer to your question is that the bobcad worked for me,had information resources to get you thru it, was cheap (about 500 bucks), and was powerful enough to take me a long way. i have recently stepped up to pro-e software, 4 and 5 axis machining and cnc turning with live tooling. let the a$$ kickin' begin again. go get a machine, some software, and get busy. it will be worth itbling bling, cha ching......... but honey
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10-30-2006 12:13 AM  12 years ago
gyan

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So I'd like to work on the software end of it right now, & get the machine later, any clues on which is the industry standard, & the most user friendly?
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10-30-2006 12:56 AM  12 years ago
busted blade

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orlando,florida

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there is no "industry" standardbling bling, cha ching......... but honey
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10-30-2006 01:04 AM  12 years ago
gyan

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Thanks BB. Too bad on that.
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10-30-2006 02:27 PM  12 years ago
kc8qpu

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This is by no means the answer and I do not endorse it at all. However I can tell you that there are a number of shops around which do not purchase software but instead someplace on the internet they find a way to download and use a crack code. Most commonly Mastercam. I use a licensed version and I can tell you first hand that the hardest part to learning how to program is knowing how to machine. It will make programs run 150% smoother. I would say get some experience first?!!!!Carpe Diem!!!
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10-30-2006 07:39 PM  12 years ago
Pole

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Norway

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Fore CAD i use Solid Edge, it is awsome, way more user friendly than Inventor and Solidworks... I realy like it.

Fore CAM i use EdgeCam, it is the only cam system i have tryed, because it is what my company are using, but i think it is wery good..
Stay tuned fore more happy days
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10-31-2006 02:08 PM  12 years ago
Havoc

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Ky.

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I heard that Autocad is not really user friendly
I only hear that from salesman for other products or from people who learned another brand first. I use inventor myself. I think it might be like choosing a favorite heli. It also may depend on the type of work you do. Sheet metal, injection molding, etc. I don't do sheet metal but I've heard it's not inventors strong point. I could probably put a tutorial on here to show you how to do almost anything with it. What you will find is that when you learn one brand of software you will not like the idea of using another.
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11-04-2006 03:46 AM  12 years ago
planedude91

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Cabot

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well, at school we have Inventor11. it is made by AtuoDesk, and it cost ALOT($3000) but i am slowly mastering it(ea right) and i can make basic parts. i made a frame for a tandem heli on it(pic below) just my tidbit of info

good luck!

http://runryder.com/photocache.htm?...pg&target=photo
Heli Fanatic... Nuff said...
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11-06-2006 10:47 PM  12 years ago
JohnnyG

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Cornwall England

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Inventor
I've used a few CAD packages such as Proengineer, Auto Cad, and Inventor and I'd say if you are new to it Inventor is the way to go..It's simple to use and does not get bogged down in the process. It thinks or rather you build like an engineer, not a comptuer programmer !!
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11-06-2006 11:05 PM  12 years ago
gyan

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Lots of ideas here thanks guys. I'm leaning towards learning one program so I'm looking for an industry std if there was one, or failing that, one that is fairly common that I know will be around for a long time.
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11-07-2006 12:34 AM  12 years ago
Havoc

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Ky.

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The industry standard has been dxf as far as sharing drawings. As long as you could make a DXF then you could communicate with everyone. That’s changing as Adobe's 3D Pdf improves. But that hasn't had much to do with the program you choose. You will find that there are still many using plain 2D autocad but you can send them drawings via dxf files. Inventor comes with Mechanical Desktop which includes autocad. Mechanical Desktop is a solid modeler also but not as fluid as Inventor. But it is built on Autocad which is the most powerful 2D drafting tool I've seen. Inventor is not based on autocad. They started from scratch with it. Since Inventor comes with Mechanical is does make your options limitless since you get three products in one. Autocad as a 2D package is actually more complicated than inventor as a 3D package so you will likely use inventor much more.
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11-08-2006 09:56 PM  12 years ago
JohnnyG

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Cornwall England

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There have been several Industry standards since I started with CAD about 8 years ago. Theres AutoCad, Pro Engineer and the latest is Katire (is that spelt rigtht?) anyway pro Eng was used by Farari and Williams along with a load of other big names. Katire is used by Airbus and similar Companies. The trouble is that as a new programme hits the market the market leader changes and everybody follows. Opt for any of the front runners and you won't go far wrong but bearing in mind the cost involved. You're talking thousends for a working copy. I fpossible go to your nearest Collage and get on a course with them as it makes all the difference and they will probably be using a well known package that is up to date. On line or dedicated CAD training companies charge big money. As for employment in the feild I beleive that as long as you are qualified in one you would be trained in the relevant one if need be. Don't quote me on the at though. It depends on what you intend to use the package for and what you are willing to pay. Bearing in mind the BIG programmes are run by big companies on big networks and you pay for the right to make money using them and proffesional support.
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11-11-2006 07:13 AM  12 years ago
rc30fan

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DFW

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Take a look at Limewire - I found AutoCAD Mechanical Desktop, Inventor and also EdgeCAM there.
I taught myself by drawing progressively more complex parts and then designing g-code to cut them. It helped me get a job as a CNC machinist and I learn more at each job.
JR 10X, Tempest FAI, X-Cell Graphite Custom, Swift16
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11-18-2006 05:50 AM  12 years ago
tauscnc

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Joliet IL

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11-18-2006 01:44 PM  12 years ago
mdu6

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Montreal

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It's CATIA not Katire

CATIA stands for:

Computer graphic Aided Three dimensional Interactive Application
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11-24-2006 04:06 AM  12 years ago
raymondv

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california

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hello every one out there looks like theres a how but of knowledge in here and i wanted to see if some could help me out. I am knew to the group and also I am new to the cnc machining,my questions are what is the best and easiest software on conversaton lathes to work with. thats because I only work on convesational lathe. also is there any books or vides that that have some examples that I can get ideas on how they program parts.: :
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11-24-2006 10:16 AM  12 years ago
kc8qpu

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sc

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Conversational is just that. It is deffinately a little different than is you were to use software package such as Work NC, or Mastercam, or Gibbs (the list goes on and on). My own personal expereince is I went down to the local Community College and took both programing and cad classes. Helped me out a ton.Carpe Diem!!!
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12-01-2006 02:42 AM  12 years ago
ch53e

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Forest, Virginia / So. Cal. Native

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I started with AutoCad 14 about 6 years ago by teaching myself. I still use AutoCad Mech6 everyday at work. About 2 years ago, I taught myself to use SolidWorks, I still use it from time to time. Now I am teaching myself to use Inventor. It draws really nice and I can't wait to start designing stuff for my heli's.

Here are some drawings I did of heli parts several years ago in SolidWorks.

Align Trex 450SE
Align Trex 600CF
TwinnRexx
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01-26-2007 11:17 AM  12 years ago
moyesboy

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uk

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There is cost free way into 3D cad. http://www.alibre.com/xpress
3D is the future by the way.
alibre is a cheap 3D solid cad package that works in a similar way to solidwork, solidedge or inventor.
The full versions come in at between $500 and $2000.
The xpress version is a free product that is fully working only the assemblies are limited in the number of different parts that can be added in. The parts can have unlimited complexity and you can make associative 2D drawings of them.
The above picture was my entry into a competition they had for driving their free alibre xpress - an ARK x4000 rotor head. I won a license of their full product with photrendering etc.

At http://www.alibre.com you will see they are using the model in the front page banner.

If anyone downloads alibre xpress they are welcome to a copy of my 3D assembly model.
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