RunRyder RC
WATCH
 2 pages [ <<    <    ( 1 )     2     NEXT    >> ] 1235 views Post Reply
Home✈️Aircraft🚁HelicopterAerial Photography and Video › What does Raw mean?
09-04-2006 01:58 PM  14 years ago
Topic Vote0Post 1
AceBird

rrElite Veteran

Utica, NY USA

MyPosts All Forum Topic
What does Raw mean?
Could someone explain what is meant by raw format vs. any other format?
Ace
What could be more fun?
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
09-04-2006 02:13 PM  14 years ago
z11355

rrMaster

New England

MyPosts All Forum Topic
raw means exactly that, raw data.

you have to remember that the data that forms an 'image' is
significantly processed by the camera electronics after capture and then formatted
into any number of standard picture formats like TIFF and JPEG.

When you shoot 'raw', you're telling the camera to not do any of that
and just give you the data that the sensor captured w/o ANY
filtering or processing. This is normally unusable so you need
to have a computer plug-in so that Photoshop/whatever can read
the data and form a picture. Raw format is specific to each
camera manufacturer and even sub-type.
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
09-04-2006 02:18 PM  14 years ago
nado

rrNovice

London, UK

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Here is a good explanation.

Dan
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR  Quote
09-04-2006 05:56 PM  14 years ago
AceBird

rrElite Veteran

Utica, NY USA

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Thanks all. I don't like the drawbacks of raw files.

I didn't know my favorite site would have such an extensive explanation.
Ace
What could be more fun?
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
09-05-2006 06:09 AM  14 years ago
CKY

rrVeteran

Sunshine Coast, BC, Canada

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Most of the new DSLR's can save both formats (jpg and raw) at the same time. The benefit being you can use the jpg immediately and get a pretty good result. The RAW file is the "digital negative?" and can be processed yourself with the proper software to extract a little more dynamic range in the shadows and highlights along white balance, better sharpening, color balance, etc. etc. Downside is memory used, not a problem with the inexpensive memory cards nowadays and hard-drive space is cheap, plus, DVD burning is now the norm for archiving all your data. You have to be pretty serious about photography, not just AP work.

Most of us are working bass ackwards and learning photography as the second step. Truely successfull people will probably have a very good photography background to begin with.

Better tools will give better results

Chris
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
09-05-2006 01:46 PM  14 years ago
Tatayoyo

rrApprentice

Belgium

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Personnaly, since I discovered all the pro's of shooting in raw mode, I never, never will shoot in jpeg anymore.

And mainly doing AP, because, you don't exactly control the exposure while up there. And raw working programs (like the tiny RawEssentials), can really get you a perfect picture of it!.

Thomas
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  Attn:RR  Quote
09-05-2006 02:32 PM  14 years ago
Dr. Fibinotchi

rrKey Veteran

Sioux Falls SD

MyPosts All Forum Topic
hmm
can photo shop cs2 work with Raw?


-Cody
If you want others to be happy, practice compassion. If you want to be happy, practice compassion.
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
09-05-2006 04:35 PM  14 years ago
aambrose

rrElite Veteran

Pana, IL

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Cody,
Yes, Adobes Camera Raw offers a lot of powerful options for your Raw images.

Tony
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR  Quote
09-05-2006 04:41 PM  14 years ago
jeffscholl

rrKey Veteran

Whitefish, MT

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Raw files are usually specific for each camera, but Adobe is pretty good about getting new updates when new models are released.

Cameras that cature raw files should come bundled with software for post processing, but I've never come across one that I liked.

Adobe Lightroom is still in it's beta, but it should be awesome since it's developers are truly listening to the pro photographer. I can't imagine it will replace CS2, however they are getting some heat about being able to do selective edits.

Raw Shooter was also great, but Adobe picked up Pixmantec and Jonsson is now on the Lightroom team.

I feel that unless you are needing fast frame rates for sports, you are doing youself a disservice by not shooting raw.

Cheers,
Jeff Scholl
GravityShots.com
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  Attn:RR  Quote
09-05-2006 09:22 PM  14 years ago
newhampshirefar

rrNovice

Rochester, NH

MyPosts All Forum Topic
I love shooting RAW. It's the best way to easily make color corrections, etc and there is a lot more data in the RAW file that gets lost with the JPG. For example, if I over-expose my picture in JPG that data is lost and even changing the balance can't bring back that information, but with RAW I can often correct it because the image data is still there. It's also a lot quicker to color correct because I can select all my images in the Adobe Bridge and set my neutral grey and have all the images adjusted instantly.

RAW does take up more space, but that is because there is more data there. Some might consider that a drawback, but I don't. Memory is cheap enough these days so I don't mind that it will fill up a 1gb card a little quicker than JPG.

Matt
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
09-05-2006 10:54 PM  14 years ago
AceBird

rrElite Veteran

Utica, NY USA

MyPosts All Forum Topic
RAW does take up more space, but that is because there is more data there. Some might consider that a drawback
How come nobody is mentioning time? Doesn't it take more time to acquire the image? This sounds to me like you would have to use a faster lens. I am use to film where time was everything. One thing I hate about inexpensive digitals is the photo that is taken is some time after you push the plunger. the shot you think you took is never the one you get.
Ace
What could be more fun?
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
09-06-2006 12:06 AM  14 years ago
nado

rrNovice

London, UK

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Doesn't it take more time to acquire the image?
The RAW file is the unprocesed data from the sensor. It takes some time to compress the file to JPG format.
I don't think the fact that the photo is taken some time after you push the plunger has got anything to do with the file format.

Dan
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR  Quote
09-06-2006 08:24 AM  14 years ago
CKY

rrVeteran

Sunshine Coast, BC, Canada

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Want a fast shutter release? Just go to manual focus, the AF is what takes all the time. Better cameras have better everything, includingly faster AF, bigger buffers and faster write speeds.

Raw is not the easy fix. You still have to understand the operations of the camera and know how to manipulate them to get what you want.

If you don't know some basics, RAW just adds one more thing to learn and understand.
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
09-06-2006 03:45 PM  14 years ago
fitenfyr

rrProfessor

Port Orchard, Washington

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Doesn't it take more time to acquire the image?
It takes no more time to "aquire" the image.
What takes time is the writing of that image from the camera buffer to the memory card.

If you look at most cameras capable of RAW images they will list the frame rates in RAW and JPG.
Usually the JPG frame rates are double the RAW rates, but like Jeff said unless you are shooting lots of fast action the RAW buffer is usually fast enough.

The Lens has nothing to do with the frame rate.

I shoot RAW for 99% of everything I shoot.
Sometimes I will drop the D1x into JPG for the "family" shots of the kids.
The buffer on my non updated D1x is totally crap for RAW.
I get 3 frames then about 45 seconds write time for all 3.
In JPG it is about 5-6 with 20 seconds write time.
Jason Stiffey
Fly Fast....Live Slow...
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
09-06-2006 05:49 PM  14 years ago
AceBird

rrElite Veteran

Utica, NY USA

MyPosts All Forum Topic
The Lens has nothing to do with the frame rate.
If I stop down the lens and increase the shutter speed the image doesn’t get dark?

For industrial vision applications, light makes a huge difference on acquisition time especially if you are trying to stop motion or measure something accurately.

I thought that some cameras had the ability to capture images in raw format or other formats that do not contain as much information as the raw format. I assumed that if you didn’t collect as much information it would be faster. You are implying that the image is always acquired in raw format and then processed to other formats. Is this how it really works?

My way of thinking is do what it takes to get a good photo and forget the countless hours of fixing and fussing to make a bad photo look good. Especially now when the output is almost instantaneous and you don’t have to worry about the lab screwing up the negative or the positive on a good take.

In the digital world, what makes the difference between a still camera and a video camera for picture quality? Is it not the same CCD and processing? I’m guessing it is still the lens that makes the difference. Can you see the light?
Ace
What could be more fun?
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
09-06-2006 06:14 PM  14 years ago
fitenfyr

rrProfessor

Port Orchard, Washington

MyPosts All Forum Topic
If I stop down the lens and increase the shutter speed the image doesn’t get dark?
Yes, but you can do that regardless of the media that is capturing the image.
Film, digital, glass plate the lens works with the camera to focus the image,control depth of field, and exposure.

The "Frame rate" I was referring to is the amount of shots per second the camera can capture.
Just like film has frames per second on a 35mm still film camera based on the motor drives ability to transport the film through the camera.

This is NOT motion pictures I am talking about only stills.

RAW is just the computing process that puts the image into bits or bites and onto the memory card.

Every digital camera captures a "RAW" image.
Then the computer in the camera process (or not) the image into the file format that you are asking it to when placing it on the card.

JPG's usually have some in camera sharpening, saturation and white balance corrections.
Then they are compressed down to the file size that you requested the image be saved in.

RAW omits all those steps and saves the image directly to the card retaining all the originally captured data from the CMOS/CCD.
It is truely a digital "negative".
Jason Stiffey
Fly Fast....Live Slow...
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
09-07-2006 06:21 AM  14 years ago
monterey_tip

rrVeteran

Monterey, Ca - USA

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Ok, since we are on the format subject, what is the difference between a Raw and Tiff image?
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
09-07-2006 07:24 AM  14 years ago
CKY

rrVeteran

Sunshine Coast, BC, Canada

MyPosts All Forum Topic
TIFF... a processed file type most editors can open, a common format years ago (could still be used in pro labs??). 16 bits per channel (48 bit color depth).
Benefit was/is no compession loss.
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
09-07-2006 03:59 PM  14 years ago
monterey_tip

rrVeteran

Monterey, Ca - USA

MyPosts All Forum Topic
Ok, so is that a benefit that would be worth using...shooting in Tiff instead of Raw? It looks like the Tiff images take up a little more storage space than Raw images?
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
09-07-2006 04:10 PM  14 years ago
CKY

rrVeteran

Sunshine Coast, BC, Canada

MyPosts All Forum Topic
absolutely NOT. If you do not have a Raw conversion program, you will not have a program that can deal with tiff effectively either I would assume. Tiff is more a final output file for high end printing.
SHARE  PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
WATCH
 2 pages [ <<    <    ( 1 )     2     NEXT    >> ] 1235 views Post Reply
Home✈️Aircraft🚁HelicopterAerial Photography and Video › What does Raw mean?
Print TOPIC

 5  Topic Subscribe

Tuesday, December 1 - 6:07 pm - Copyright © 2000-2020 RunRyder   EMAILEnable Cookies

Login Here
 New Subscriptions 
 Buddies Online