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HomeAircraftHelicopterMain Discussion › Duralite wiring
02-09-2006 03:13 AM  12 years agoPost 1
Peter Wales

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Orlando Fl

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I bought a new duralite regulator today and immediately got confused by the wiring.

It says in the instructions do not put the regulator between the switch and the battery, and the wiring picture shows the regulator connected directly to the battery. The switch goes nowhere except to a digital load tester which I dont have.

The unswitched version shows an "Aftermarket" switch between the battery and regulator. Do I need to add one of these?

If I do, what is the point in me paying and extra $15 or so for a switched version of the regulator?

Peter Wales
http://scalehelicopters.org

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02-09-2006 03:16 AM  12 years agoPost 2
Bobby Watts

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Orlando, FL

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What kind of Regulator do you have? The Regulator with the switch built in, or just the regulator itself??

www.bobbywatts.com

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02-09-2006 03:43 AM  12 years agoPost 3
Shortman

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Portland, Oregon

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Look at it this way. The regulator has to go INBETWEEN the receiver and the battery. Why? Because think about it, how could the regulator "regulate" the voltage of your battery TO the receiver, if it is hooked up anywhere else but inbetween the 7.4V and the receiver?

So just hook the switch up to the battery, and then plug the regulator into the battery, and the regulator should plug into the receiver.

Team JR
Team ThunderPower RC
Boca Bearings

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02-09-2006 03:51 AM  12 years agoPost 4
ddavison

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Brownsville, Pennsylvania

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On the unswitched regulator the regulator is "hot" all the time and will drain the pack unless there is a switch to disconnect it, so your standard switch goes between the regulator and battery. On the switched/regulator the switch does not break the circuit between the regulator and battery directly but disconnects it electronicly thru the regulator this way if the switch fails in flight the regulator/battery/ receiver circuit stays hot. I am using the failsafe switched regulators

DaveDavison,GasGob,WhiplashGas,Spectra,JRXG11MV,12X

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02-09-2006 04:43 AM  12 years agoPost 5
angelob

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Stoughton WI

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Here is a page with pics as to how to wire up the regulator:

http://www.duralitebatteries.com/tech-acc.html

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02-09-2006 04:49 AM  12 years agoPost 6
Blair

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Republic of Canuckistan

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Like Double D said;

If you bought the safe switch version the reg goes between the pack and the Rx. If you bought the reg without the safe switch you need to add an aftermarket switch between the pack and the reg otherwise the reg will drain the pack (very bad - and expensive )

Blair

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02-09-2006 11:37 AM  12 years agoPost 7
Coloradoheli3d

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Colorado USA

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Yeap, Dave Davison has it right, thats the way they hook up.

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02-09-2006 12:55 PM  12 years agoPost 8
Peter Wales

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Orlando Fl

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So no current flows out of the battery when the regulator is switched off? Isn't technology wonderful.

Thanks, that clears it up.

Peter Wales
http://scalehelicopters.org

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02-09-2006 01:36 PM  12 years agoPost 9
rcadd1ct

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Richardson, Texas

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Aparently they are switching off the output, not the input of the regulator.

Under no load the draw will be light. If you fly every weekend it is not a big deal I am told.

If you set a heli up for a while, you can ruin a battery by discharging it too much.

-RCA .......... Making Cuisinarts Fly!!!!!!!

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02-09-2006 02:05 PM  12 years agoPost 10
BarracudaHockey

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Jacksonville FL

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Peter you're partially correct. On a switched regulator the switch supplies power to a small circuit on the regulator that holds the regulator in an OFF state. So when the switch is OFF its actually closed and the circuit complete. When the switch is ON, its open, the hold down voltage is gone and the regulator is powered. That way if the switch fails, they fail open and the result is you can't turn the reciever power off (you have to disconnect the battery)

So the correct setup is battery black lead to the regulator, the regulator plugs into the reciever and that leaves you two male connectors. The yellow is the charge lead which feeds into the stay balance circuit on the battery and a black lead to load test the battery.

The end result is if you are going to store long term, disconnect the battery from the regulator or there is always a small ammount of current flowing through the switch and it will drain your battery. Mine have sat for a couple weeks with only minimal voltage drop but its something to be aware of.

Andy
AMA 77227
http://www.jaxrc.com

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02-10-2006 03:13 AM  12 years agoPost 11
Peter Wales

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Orlando Fl

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The problem is that it may be some months between charges. I need to disconnect the battery after flying and recharging. The next ones I buy wont have the switch in there. I'll buy a Maxx products heavy duty charge switch and charge the battery up through that, it'll be safer, even though I may lose the added safety of the "permanently on" switch, in a vibration free, fuel free environment, the switch shouldn't be a source of failure.

Peter Wales
http://scalehelicopters.org

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02-10-2006 03:58 PM  12 years agoPost 12
Stone

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Trondheim, Norway

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On a regulated setup like this, do you guys see any point in installing an onboard voltage monitor between the battery and the regulator -
or is it better and/or safer to use a load tester, like the duralite one, between flights? At what battery voltage is it no longer advisable to continue flying when using a 7.4V LiIon regulated to 5.1V?

How high could the current drain on a setup with all digitals, gyro and governor be expected to be? Say, 4x9252's, a 401 w/9254 and a GV-1 in a 50 machine. Related to certified discharge rates of different battery packs.

--
Stone

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02-10-2006 04:12 PM  12 years agoPost 13
z11355

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New England

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a voltage monitor is worthless unless you're loading it.

most everyone has a stop-fly voltage of 7.0

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02-10-2006 04:21 PM  12 years agoPost 14
BarracudaHockey

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Jacksonville FL

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Duralite says 6.9 volts with a 1 amp load.

I've flown 7 or 8 flights with a 4000 mah pack and with a load it was still 7.2v

Andy
AMA 77227
http://www.jaxrc.com

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02-10-2006 04:44 PM  12 years agoPost 15
Stone

rrNovice

Trondheim, Norway

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Are you using the Duralite LiIon packs with max discharge rate of 2C?

I guess wires will be glowing before you reach 2C drain on a 4000mAh pack!

--
Stone

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