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HomeAircraftHelicopterBeginners Corner › Time to quit?
10-16-2005 05:53 PM  12 years agoPost 1
Thomashome

rrVeteran

West Sussex UK

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I decided to emabark on a new hobby so I did a little research and bought a Honety Bee CP2, took it home, powered it up then put in back in the box and bought Realflight G3. I had another play with the CP2 a couple of weeks later and didn't even flatten the battery before it was boxed up again.

I have since got a Trex model for G3 which seems as hard as the CP2. I'm finding pretty hard to get the hang it of and am wondering if I ever will as I don't seem to have the natural reflex to control it.

I know that smaller models are harder but how long does it take to learn? are there any electronics out there that make life easier for the begginer? or should I go back to my trusty nitro car.

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10-16-2005 05:58 PM  12 years agoPost 2
nappyroots2182

rrElite Veteran

Moline, il

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i think you should try a 30-50 nitro ship. they are very stable compared to the micros. your reflexes will grow as you learn but should start on something a bit slower. about the only thing electronics wise for beginners to spend good money on is a good gyro. i fought my first heli forever till i got a good gyro then it all went fairly quick from there. hope this helps. let me know if you need any help.

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10-16-2005 06:15 PM  12 years agoPost 3
bell1684

rrApprentice

North Kingstown, RI USA

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Dont bother spending more money on more helis if you cant fly what you already have..practice on the sim and build confidence in yourself and your skills...confidence will come, just stick with it.

No doubt the micros are challenging to learn on. I have 2 HB CP's and they are a handful to fly, ill admit that! The learning curve is steep but is very rewarding when you make progress.

Replacement parts for the HB are cheap, so dont be afraid to fly it & crash it. I think I learned as much by crashing as I did by flying out entire packs successfully.

Good luck!

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10-16-2005 06:44 PM  12 years agoPost 4
Red9301

rrApprentice

London UK

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Dont give up! This is a hard, yet extremely rewarding hobby. Fire up that sim and check out this webpage;

http://www.dream-models.com/eco/index.html

I would definately recomend going nitro though, nitro's rock

Red

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10-16-2005 06:50 PM  12 years agoPost 5
Thomashome

rrVeteran

West Sussex UK

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I'm not keen on going Nitro, due to space, noise (hundreds of horses near to me) and time not to mention cost.

Came across this, not sure I'd be able to fit on my CP2 though.


http://www.helibits.co.uk/enter.htm...html&lang=en-gb

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10-16-2005 07:14 PM  12 years agoPost 6
nojohnny101

rrElite Veteran

10 miles north of Cincy, OHIO

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hey
i do have the co-pilot and it works extremely well..

not sure how on how well it works on a small helicopter....

check out these links for more info

copilot uses

co-pilot info

setting up the co-pilot


Thanks
~Will~

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10-17-2005 03:09 AM  12 years agoPost 7
BC Don

rrElite Veteran

Calgary, AB Canada

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My suggestion would have been to go with a 30 size nitro ship to start with as well, with training gear. But, if you have a constraint that limits you then make sure you have appropriate training gear for your TRex.

I tried a Hummingbird as my "starter" ship. Still can't hover worth a darn with it but I can hover all day with my 30 & 50 and not too bad with my TRex. The small fixed pitch helis are the hardest in my view to fly.

If you want something that is easier to fly, start with the counter-rotating rotor design. MRC makes one and it is very stable. Can really only fly indoors (or no wind) and won't do much other than move about and hover but is good training.

Got Money? Send it to me, I'm a Heli Addict.

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10-17-2005 05:14 AM  12 years agoPost 8
crowfly

rrVeteran

Pleasant View, TN U.S.A.

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If you're also struggling with the simulator, try slowing down the simulator rate. I don't have G3 but I'm sure it's an option. Once you can hover well at the reduced rate, start speeding it back up again gradually.

If God had meant for man to fly, he would have given him more money

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10-17-2005 06:30 AM  12 years agoPost 9
MicroDOC

rrVeteran

Goleta, CA

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crowfly hit the nail on the head when he said to slow down the simulator when you are first learning. Speed it up slowly as you become more experienced. Before you know it you'll be back up to real time. I found that slowing down the sim when I was practicing nose in really helped.
Just hang in there, it will come.

Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it!

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10-17-2005 09:37 AM  12 years agoPost 10
colsy

rrElite Veteran

Cambridge, UK

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I also have a FP and a CP hummingbird, and to be honest i could never get them to fly right, i am self taught and learnt the hard way, my IKARUS ECO 8, was what i learned to hover on, i also fly R30 Nitro, and they are oh so stable, i still have my eco 8 and still fly her, as i can fly in the garden, and have her ready in 10 min, she is quite cheap and stable, i have never tried a sim so cant comment, but i also have two zooms, which are great fun but do take a lot of taming, i would not choose these as learning tools, personaly, i think if you dont have the room for nitro, then consider the eco 8, or maybe the new viper, the eco 8 in standrd ccpm form flies very well for a learner, i hovered mine for almost two years with three 7 cell sub,c packs, and have since upgraded to brushless setup, although more expensive to operate than my Raptor, then can be made to perform...
I think i wasted at least half of my two year learning curve on bad setup, so my advice, is get some help, and if you can get someone to test fly your machine, it will help you mentally, as you know it flies..
Good Luck.................................

Only Quote From Experience.

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HomeAircraftHelicopterBeginners Corner › Time to quit?
10-17-2005 10:35 AM  12 years ago •• Post 11 ••
darrens

rrKey Veteran

United Kingdom

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Thomas,
I doubt your equipment on the HB will be able to take the co-pilot or if that little machine will handle the weight. There are mixed views around that anyway, as one day you will need to throw away the crutch and just walk by yourself. Personally, I am glad I learned without one and believe you will get "fully fledged" sooner without it.
There are some larger and more stable electrics out there. I have a Robbe Eolo and love it, the Logo helis are also very nice. Both these machines fly outside in some wind without difficulty.
Ultimately, this is a long haul hobby and you have to accept that you need to put serious time in to get good. Lots of sim time helps and I would suggest that at least 30 mins a night for 2 weeks should get to a tail in hover. Don't stop there....keep flying the sim whenever you can, it's just about stick time!
At most flying clubs you will find people who have been flying for around a year yet are still just hovering. All I can say is persevere, it is very rewarding when you get the hang of it and if you put in enough time and effort, you could be doing inverted cicuits after about 6 months, it's up you.

Good luck

He who dies with the most toys is the winner!

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10-17-2005 10:41 AM  12 years agoPost 12
darrens

rrKey Veteran

United Kingdom

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No offense Colsy, but the Eco 8 is old in design when compared to the Eolo or Logo so I would not recommend that if he is considering buying a new one now.

He who dies with the most toys is the winner!

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10-17-2005 11:06 AM  12 years agoPost 13
Thomashome

rrVeteran

West Sussex UK

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I decided against the CP as I have too many servos controlling the swash plate. When I asked the chap in the shop for a heli to start with I'm not sure his chioce of the HB CP2 was a wise one.

I might nip out later and have a look at the Eolo at I think it looks more suitable for what I want.

I'd like to spend more time on the Sim but the Mrs goes nuts if I spent too much time on the PC!

At least it seems that I'm not alone in my struggle to get the hang of this which is encouraging.

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10-17-2005 02:17 PM  12 years agoPost 14
darrens

rrKey Veteran

United Kingdom

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Just keep thinking that as it's so much fun, if it were easy, everyone would do it!!!
Decide to do this at the pace you are both capable of and your time restrictions (read wife!!!!) allow.
There is no written rule that you must be able to hover after a given period of time. Some people go to thier club for a couple of hours every other Sunday. They may be happy to stay at the same stage of just about hovering, yet have been in the hobby for 3 years. If that is what they enjoy then nobody can knock them for it. Others and those who really can fly (Alan Szabo for example) probably fly 30-50 flight per week. These are the 2 extremes and it is up to you to sit yourself where you are most comfortable, but if it is at the lower flight time of the scale you will have to accept that it will take quite a while.
Ultimately, the fun of it is really worth the wait so don't allow frustration to cause you to give up, we have all been where you are, to get where we are now!!!!
Other thing is to keep communication here for moral support/help and to join a local club. The BMFA website will tell you where the nearest one is and you will normally meet a great bunch of people willing to help wherever they can.
The Eolo is a lovely machine and can be set up for very stable flight. Having been the first at our club there are now about 5 Eolo owners (3 flying and 2 being built currently) and a number of other people have expressed an interest. Also, once you become accomplished you are able to get some real power through it for very good 3D performance. It's a choice which I am sure will not dissapoint you.

He who dies with the most toys is the winner!

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10-17-2005 03:43 PM  12 years agoPost 15
Thomashome

rrVeteran

West Sussex UK

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But which Eolo?, there seem to be a few. I don't want one that is too hard to fly, on the other hand, if after a few time out I have out grown it.

If I get one what is the best/cost effictive bits to go in it, ie. Gyro, radio, motor ect.

Cheers

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10-17-2005 04:37 PM  12 years agoPost 16
darrens

rrKey Veteran

United Kingdom

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Ignore the R22 one and consider the Spirit Pro the starting point. There is then the Li which is designed for Lipo cells (different canopy, but not neccessary) and has belt drive. I use Lipos on my Spirit Pro and they fit this canopy no problem. Then, if you are feeling flush, there is the LE. The LE is a limited Edition and has most of the available metal upgrades you could wish for, but is pricey and the upgrades are not needed until you can really fly it's ass off!

I would recommend starting with a Spirit Pro kit. £230
Motor/esc I would use a Kontronik Twist 37/Jazz 40-6-18 combo £210
Battery 3S2P 5000mah £110
Futaba 401 Gyro £100
JR410G Tail Servo £50
3 x Hitec 81 cyclic servos £45
JR770 Receiver £60
Expect to pay around £50 for a charger that will charge Lipo cells.
Now you have spent around £850 before radio so I would suggest budgeting for £200 on a radio. In your shoes I would try to buy a second hand (ebay, model mag or BMFA website) radio and would suggest a JR 9X. It is personal choice but if you go for a Futaba radio, remember that you will need to replace the JR Receiver above with the equivelent Futaba unit. Whatever radio you choose it must be 7 channels or more. Obvoiusly you can choose to buy other items from the list second hand too, but I would always buy a new receiver and servos unless you are very confident of the source.
You may now be thinking that a Nitro heli would be cheeper and it could be, but with fuel at a £18/gallon, you soon recoup the extra cost.
Let us know what you choose.

He who dies with the most toys is the winner!

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10-18-2005 10:18 AM  12 years agoPost 17
colsy

rrElite Veteran

Cambridge, UK

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Darrens, no offense taken, i too looked at logo, but the all up cost was to expensive, at the time for me at least, i mentioned the eco or viper as cost's for upgrading down the brushless path are not quite so frightening, also midland heli's have healthy stocks of ikarus parts, i do agree with the old design but mine has served me well,..
perhaps budget, available time and space should be mentioned in posts to help that important first purchase....................................

Only Quote From Experience.

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10-18-2005 11:47 AM  12 years agoPost 18
Sar

rrElite Veteran

Saugeties, NY

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I'm finding pretty hard to get the hang it of and am wondering if I ever will as I don't seem to have the natural reflex to control it.
A lot of us didn't have the natural refelexes to control heli's, it's not really natural. People who play video games might have a slight advantage as they are used to controlling objects they aren't connected to. The best way to learn is to practice, it can be frustrating. If you keep going back you will find that it gets easier each time, if only by a little bit and you start to get a sense of what's needed to keep it in control.

I spent a couple of weeks on the sim before hovering my Raptor 60 for the first time, which is a pretty stable helicopter, and was pretty rough with the real thing. The biggest problem was my tendancy to over-control it which meant I was constantly chasing it around with the sticks. A combo of the sim and the real thing sped things along pretty good. This isn't a race

--
Jon

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10-18-2005 01:25 PM  12 years agoPost 19
tchavei

rrProfessor

Portugal

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After buying my first heli and after finishing building it I finally got hands on a simulator.

After trying the Sim for 10 minutes I started to feel butterflies in my stomach thinking if I was able to sell all the stuff I bought on ebay before it was too late

The truth is that each one has its own pace.

Sure I get frustrated when I see ppl here that start doing figure 8 after one week and loops and rolls after one month... is it the right attitude? I don't know. Some ppl hover by the first tank, do figure 8's by the third and crash on the fifth...

It took me 3 months (4 days a month) to be absolutely confortable at hovering in all directions, another 2 months to come over the fear of figure 8s without breaking in each turn and I only recently started to do wide fast circuits around myself. I do ocasional piros and double piros for fun and because I'm confortable at them... how many newbies have we seen that try to do piros on their first day and dork it?

I have never crashed so far or even had a hard landing which doesn't mean I won't crash it eventually (thats why I have 2 birds) but so far caution has paid off... I'm slower than most of the 3D natural experts around here but I'm learning and having fun at my own pace.

Just take it slow and you will get there

Cheers
Tony


--------------------
"Perfection and patience usually walk side by side..."

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10-18-2005 06:52 PM  12 years agoPost 20
GroundPounder

rrVeteran

South Africa, Cape Town

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(hundreds of horses near to me) and time not to mention cost.
Wrong on two counts :-)

You would be surprised how little animals give a **** about the noise from a nitro heli.
Without realising it, I was hovering my Raptor 50 about 5 meters away from my cat, sleeping on a deck chair in the garden.
All she did, was shift around to keep it in view !

Second, an electric heli, that gives you the same stability as a big nitro ship, would cost you twice as much.

I now have a T Rex, so, I can speak!
Batteries are expensive, charging is a pain in the butt.
Plus LiPo batts are way more dangerous that 5 liters of fuel stored in the garage !

GroundPounder

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HomeAircraftHelicopterBeginners Corner › Time to quit?
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