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HomeAircraftHelicopterMain Discussion › BMFA A Certificate
05-02-2005 10:15 PM  13 years agoPost 21
Drunk Monk

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Preston, UK

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Not really. Take the B test for example, how many pilots do you know can do a hovering M or top hat? or would attempt controlled manouvers like that in their normal flying if they didn't have to take the test? It gives people a target to aim for and gives a sense of achievement.


Stephen

I only open my mouth to change feet.....

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05-02-2005 10:25 PM  13 years agoPost 22
zoom boy

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N.E. Lincolnshire UK

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I know one or two pilots that would have no problem with that and could do it at a moments notice

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05-02-2005 10:39 PM  13 years agoPost 23
Drunk Monk

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Preston, UK

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ok, so out of the hundreds of heli pilots in this country, how many do you reckon could fly those manouvers? I know a few pilots that can do alot of the 3D stuff but can't hold a decent hover or do a 45 degree decent. There are also plenty of people now learning to fly on the sim and can hover on the first tank, do loops and rolls on the second and hover inverted on their 3rd. Would you call then decent pilots, even though they can't even hover side in?


Stephen

I only open my mouth to change feet.....

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05-02-2005 11:25 PM  13 years agoPost 24
zoom boy

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N.E. Lincolnshire UK

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I would say no they arnt if they cant do the basics, but if you can and can do the more advanced stuff aswell, then I dont see any reason to go to the trouble.

Personally I think anyone who starts doing anything, even a basic loop before they can hover in all orientations and has full control of the model in conventional flight, and can move it where they want when they want in any orientation at a controlled speed and height is a dangerous idiot.

For the pilot that has mastered the basics and progressed past the scope of the A and B certificate without skipping those skill sets, then taking the test is a bit pointless (not really testing the pilot) unless they want to do a display since they are requirements.

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05-02-2005 11:30 PM  13 years agoPost 25
chappers

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north east of england

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too true drunk monk! as a BMFA examiner, ive seen lots of good 3D pilots who cant hover with precision, and hence failed!! I was asked to visit another club to exaine a guy for his "B", everything went fine untill i asked him to complete a right hand circuit to which he replied " sorry i can only fly left circuits"!!?? and was upset when i failed him there and then? and another who was using the farm house chimney as a marker for his stall turn!!!!

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05-02-2005 11:36 PM  13 years agoPost 26
zoom boy

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N.E. Lincolnshire UK

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LOL, cant do a right hand circuit, that just shows a lack of personal discipline.

I realised early on that skipping anything was just stupid, it is just so obvious that if you get into a position you dont know then you are screwed, so I forced myself to learn hovering in all orientations with the wind from any direction, and can do left and right hand circuits with no probs, can do nose in circles in both directions at a controlled speed and distance, basically all the basics

Then and only then did I start to get into aerobatics, ie loops, rolls, stall turns, and now a bit of 3D

I hate the idea of people skipping learning the basics and trying to run before crawling

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05-02-2005 11:44 PM  13 years agoPost 27
chappers

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north east of england

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hi zoom boy, it also can prove to other people your capable of controlling your toys correctly! and for up and coming pilots it can help to give them a target to aim for with their flying skills and not just fly aimlessly about?

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05-02-2005 11:49 PM  13 years agoPost 28
zoom boy

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N.E. Lincolnshire UK

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Sorry but I have to disagree with that, I know of one person (planker) who had a B certificate IIRC taken off of him later on because of something.

I dont really believe you need a certificate to prove anything, people should be able to just watch you fly and they will soon see if you are skilled or not

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05-02-2005 11:54 PM  13 years agoPost 29
chappers

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north east of england

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thats fine your entitled to your opinion, no matter how wrong you are!

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05-02-2005 11:56 PM  13 years agoPost 30
zoom boy

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N.E. Lincolnshire UK

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Its not an opinion and I'm not wrong, its a fact, he had it taken off of him, so having an A or B doesnt prove that the holder has the skills for them, even if they had them at the time the test was taken

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05-03-2005 12:13 AM  13 years agoPost 31
chappers

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north east of england

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sorry i was refering to your second comment, but i dont wish to fall out over it. i just believe anything that can improve the standard of flying by giving them something to practise, and then prove to an examiner they are capable of performing said manouvres, and also having a certificate of competance which can be shown to interested parties (eg councils, land owners etc) can only be a good thing. cant it?

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05-03-2005 12:24 AM  13 years agoPost 32
zoom boy

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N.E. Lincolnshire UK

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Yes, but what about pilots with the MPA and MAA, they dont bother with anything at all, and I doubt anything like a council would understand what A and B certificates mean.

All I meant to say was that you dont need either certificate, and can be a far better pilot without one than a pilot with one, so you cant really just use posession of a certificate as an indication of ability, you have to see it in reality

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05-03-2005 12:29 AM  13 years agoPost 33
chappers

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north east of england

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really your saying your not capable of obtaining one? so they must be no good then? like i said, your entitled to your opinion no matter how wrong you are!?

ps. our local council do understand certificates of competance

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05-03-2005 12:32 AM  13 years agoPost 34
zoom boy

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N.E. Lincolnshire UK

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Excuse me, how do you know, oh wait, no solid responce to refute what I say so its personal attack time.

Does the council actually understand what they mean though.

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05-03-2005 12:35 AM  13 years agoPost 35
chappers

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north east of england

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not at all please dont take it personally lets just stop here and agree to disagree

i believe the council (at the time) believed them to be similar to a driving license ie. you proved to an examiner on the day you were capable of operating the vehicle safetly, or dont you agree with driving tests either?

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05-03-2005 12:38 AM  13 years agoPost 36
zoom boy

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N.E. Lincolnshire UK

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Fine, I'll leave it there, but I still disagree

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05-03-2005 01:18 AM  13 years agoPost 37
G-DAVE

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Tyne and Wear , England

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A-Certs
If you happen to be the Safety Marshall at your clubs fly-in - with fliers who's ability your not sure of. What better than, to say the minimum requirement to fly is and A Cert. for example - this gives an indication that the fliers have the basic expertise needed to safely operate their models.
I can't see an arguement against that - unless it's that certain individuals would deem it an affront to lay bare there talents before there ""betters"" just for a bit of paper.
Dave

If it's not fun, your not doing it right !

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05-03-2005 10:04 AM  13 years agoPost 38
JerryLu

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Gretton, Northants - England

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Hi Guys, here's a new angle.

I was informed by a BMFA Examiner that if you do not have any certificate, your BMFA insurance is invalidated unless you are supervised during your flying by a (possibly) B certified flier.

Anyone confirm this?

Jerry

Jerry

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05-03-2005 01:26 PM  13 years agoPost 39
Peefor

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Norfolk UK

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Jerry

That is incorrect as far as the BMFA are concerned. HOWEVER, any Club can make any rule for it's membership. There are Clubs where you are not allowed to fly unsupervised unless in possession of an A cert, but you are still insured.

Pete

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05-03-2005 01:59 PM  13 years agoPost 40
clueless

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somewhere in between

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Its been doing my head in a bit, my local club has instigated that rule about not flying unaccompanied unless you pass the A cetrificate, but guess what...they have no-one there qualified to test me, proof indeed it doesnt take many brain cells to be a planker....the dumbasses

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