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HomeAircraftHelicopterMain Discussion › Aluminium Blades - Why not?
11-03-2004 05:33 PM  13 years agoPost 1
Pliczner

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Szczecin - Poland (middle europe)

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Hi Guys,


I was just wondering why are metal blades not allowed to use.

Carbon blades are as dangerous as aluminium ones.


I have on set of aluminum M-Blades for my shuttle and I find them GREAT.


I had already 3 crashes, 3 times Tailboom exchage, twice broken landing gear, once main mast, stabilizer bar and spindle bent, ball bearings in bladeholders broken, twice I hit ground with them lightly and they are STILL FINE.


My composite blades don't live so long....

other thing they are only about 6-7% thick ... easier to run, longer flight time...

Two ultimate life rules: 1. Never say all you know.

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11-03-2004 05:40 PM  13 years agoPost 2
Greg Faust

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Northern VA, USA

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At least in the US, AMA insurance will not cover you if you use metal blades on your heli or metal propellers on your airplanes.

<<<Lithium Field Rep>>>

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11-03-2004 05:42 PM  13 years agoPost 3
pcliftonjr

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Phoenix, AZ

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I'd never use them even if they weren't...it's like slinging 600m knife blades

but that's me...

Paul

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11-03-2004 05:45 PM  13 years agoPost 4
cwm

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Las Vegas NV

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I'd never use them even if they weren't...it's like slinging 600m knife blades
Yea those 600 mm Carbon Fiber coverd wood blade are so much more safe!!!

Just Fly It!!!

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11-03-2004 05:55 PM  13 years agoPost 5
Crusty Commie

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Wales

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Right....The only way we are gonna sort this is with a sword-fight...One takes the v blade the opponant to arm himself with the aluminium blade..., gentleman have at it

I am dsylexia of borg..resistance is fruity...your arse will be laminated

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11-03-2004 05:59 PM  13 years agoPost 6
sabooo

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Allentown, PA area

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wouldn't they be a bit heavy?



I was going to take up Origami, but someone said the local club folded.

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11-03-2004 06:07 PM  13 years agoPost 7
Fullagas

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Michigan

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.
On BIG reason (I'm no engineer) is fatigue. Depends on the alloy, but aluminum has a stress limit, only so much twisting, bending, torsion it can take. It may have 'X' cycles, so guess what happens when you fly 'X+1'? Failure.

At least with wood, CF, fiberglass, etc., when you break 'em, there's little repair that's safe. Bend the AL blades? Bend them back and 'Hope' for the best.

No thanks!

.

Flying helis since gyros had springs.

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11-03-2004 06:27 PM  13 years agoPost 8
Pliczner

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Szczecin - Poland (middle europe)

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first thing: ALUMINIUM BLADES ARE NOT KNIVES
second thing - fatigue.... in this case, rc-heli alu-blades are not as big as ones used in real helis. I am an engineer and had to do with material stress limit. What can I say - smaller blades will have much better stress limit than bigger ones. In real world this is a problem - but in RC-world - we can forget it.

Two ultimate life rules: 1. Never say all you know.

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11-03-2004 06:36 PM  13 years agoPost 9
Pliczner

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Szczecin - Poland (middle europe)

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composite and wood blades will start to break up if they hit someone/something...

Will carbon ones too? I don't think so. It depends of course on costruction, rotor speed, airfoil, blade tickness, etc.

but is it not better that blade will be in one part, than will loose parts when hits someone/something. These parts would be like bullets at 2000 rpm...

Two ultimate life rules: 1. Never say all you know.

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11-03-2004 06:44 PM  13 years agoPost 10
Pliczner

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Szczecin - Poland (middle europe)

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Fullagas
I don't trust repaired blades.

I've found after closer inspection on one set of mine composit blades some really small cracks (yes it was after light crash), but blades look just fine... is it safer than the alu-blades? I don't think so...

Two ultimate life rules: 1. Never say all you know.

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11-03-2004 06:53 PM  13 years agoPost 11
Evil_Homer

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Cubbington, Warwickshire, United Kingdom

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I beleive the BMFA also do not allow the use of metal blades, or any blade which has been sharped up at the leading edge (i beleive).
Anyways would be risky if someone decided to go that route - sword swinging at 1500 rpm

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11-03-2004 06:54 PM  13 years agoPost 12
Ivan

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Wichita

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the simple reason:

everyone knows that exsposure to aluminum causes alzheimer's.

Thye don't want us to forget how to land these helis.

Back to it!

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11-03-2004 06:56 PM  13 years agoPost 13
Pliczner

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Szczecin - Poland (middle europe)

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and what's the stress limit of wood or composite, carbon blades?
how about that?

Two ultimate life rules: 1. Never say all you know.

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11-03-2004 07:04 PM  13 years agoPost 14
pcliftonjr

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Phoenix, AZ

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cvm,
Yea those 600 mm Carbon Fiber coverd wood blade are so much more safe!!!
They are to me...that's MY opinion, you can make up your own mind.

Paul

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11-03-2004 07:34 PM  13 years agoPost 15
Drunk Monk

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Preston, UK

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One takes the v blade the opponant to arm himself with the aluminium blade...,
My money is on the V-Blade

Carbon blades won't do as much damage on a heli that is spooling down. Ever been hit in the leg by one? I can see a metal one doing much more damage.

One advantage of metal blades might be that they wouldn't explode on contact with the ground, they'd probably just bend but stay intact.

Do you think metal blades in metal blade grip holders might cause interferance?


Stephen

I only open my mouth to change feet.....

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11-03-2004 08:27 PM  13 years agoPost 16
dhurst12

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Chicago

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Do you think metal blades in metal blade grip holders might cause interferance?
Only if the grips are so lose that contact between the two surfaces is completely disrupted. If this is the case....interference is the least of your worries

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11-03-2004 09:02 PM  13 years agoPost 17
w.pasman

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Netherlands

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Pliczner,
Will carbon ones too? I don't think so. It depends of course on costruction, rotor speed, airfoil, blade tickness, etc.
Carbon blades break when they hit something. They have high torsion and stretching strength but not so much sideways. I guess they do that by weaving the fibres appropriately or putting the mat in the proper orientation when making the blades. Of course it depends on what they hit - they wont break if you hit a butterfly - but most hits will be fatal for the blades.

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11-03-2004 09:07 PM  13 years agoPost 18
Pliczner

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Szczecin - Poland (middle europe)

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blades are metal, grips plastic, and I had them with metal blade holders. No problems at all.

Two ultimate life rules: 1. Never say all you know.

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11-03-2004 09:10 PM  13 years agoPost 19
eSmith

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Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

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The reason for "Why not" is it starts crap like this: http://www.runryder.com/t57892p1/?h...sed+during+demo

It has nothing to do with safety, it has everything to do with keeping certain topics out of site lest history repeat itself.

And as someone's tagline points out. Should history repeat itself, I would expect we will see the same thing again....

Nobody wants another debate like that one!

-eSmith.

http://www.edmheli.ca

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11-03-2004 09:43 PM  13 years agoPost 20
ShShShShlut...

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Kansas

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Hey, just a newbie to this forum today but had to toss in a few sense on this one. There is a big difference in Aluminum...regular aluminum is relatively soft and will wear and elongate with repeated centrifugal force applied but Alcoa Aluminum is harder and has "memory"...it is used in the stuctures of many commercial airliners and heli's as well. I used to work as a "hand former" in the aircraft industry and often hand formed and straightened parts for heli's and aircraft; Alcoa could be clamped to a table and twisted 180 degrees and spring back to within hundredths of where it started. It is also expensive but can be obtained from aircraft surplus yards. To end though I would not consider it a good choice for rotor blades...it will also eventually elongate with centrifugal force although much slower than regular aluminum. Better to stick with the triend and true than to "lose members". Take Care

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