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11-02-2004 04:09 PM  13 years agoPost 1
lrogers

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Mobile, Al

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Greetings all.
I have a question concerning the Real flight G2. I'm working hard with sim to prepare for my first real bird shortly after the first of the year. Right now the leading contenders are the JR 50 Venture & the Raptor 50.
I have G2 and add-on disks 3&4. My question, for training purposes, is it better to stick with one helicopter or fly all of them to get a varity of "feel".
I'm now hovering comfortably with the IMPALA 30, Sundog 60, Caliber 30. I'm fairly comfortable the Raptors. I can keep most of the rest from crashing, most of the time (the Concept E is kicking my butt).
I'm very comfortable tail in and right side on, and I can manage nose in for a short time before I have to kick the tail around.
Any suggestions on how to improve my training? I'm flying every night at least 3 full tanks of fuel in the "bird-of0the-day".

Thanks for your help.

Larry Rogers - R/C Helicopter Pilot

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11-02-2004 04:42 PM  13 years agoPost 2
dariof

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Henderson, NV / Laguna Niguel, CA

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If you can fly one you can pretty much fly them all. There are subtle differences..kind of like driving different vehicles.

It sounds like you are on the right track. Now remember, when you actually fly a real R/C heli, it will feel somewhat different yet again than the sim. The sim is probably around 70-80% accurate with respect to feel. Some others will give you different numbers, as it is purely subjective.

For fun I fly the Herrier and the F-15's. I also place myself behind the aircraft and fly all the scenery. WHen the new G3 comes out, the scenery won;t be so limited...it has a 5,000 scenery range.

Best Regards, Dario

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11-02-2004 05:25 PM  13 years agoPost 3
BarracudaHockey

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Jacksonville FL

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It also won't ship with any heli's

Andy
AMA 77227
http://www.jaxrc.com

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11-02-2004 07:04 PM  13 years agoPost 4
wolfdad

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Southern Maryland

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I would agree with dariof's appraisal, however, for me, it seems that things with the "real things" happen a lot more quickly, however that difference may be the difference between sitting in a comforable chair and knowing you can start again with a click of the mouse or standing there watching one of your "pride and joys" bite the dirt as your eyes roll back in your head and change to dollar signs. Personally, I would recommend you save and edit one aircraft and fly that one the majority of the time. Then, for a break, try one of the fixed wing aircraft. One thing I have noticed is flying the fixed wings has dramatically improved my orientation skills. When I first try a new fixed wing aircraft, I go into the "chase" mode (F6, I think) and just have some fun until I can land and do consistent touch and go's, then swap back to the "stand on the ground and watch" mode.

I know this is sacriledge, however I am also just finishing a GP Christien Eagle biplane, so I have been spreading my time out between fixed and rotory wing models. If you can get your hands on Update 5, try out the V22...whole new ball game.

Personally, I started with the Impala 30 and edited it til I had characteristics similiar to my Voyager 50 and went from there. I have since started flying an edited MD500.

Sounds like you are off to a good start. Good luck to you and welcome aboard!

wolfdad sends....

"There are those who have...and, those who will" IRCHA #2117, AMA #70068, Turbine Waiver #105

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11-02-2004 08:27 PM  13 years agoPost 5
maller

rrVeteran

Bucks County, PA

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If you can do OK with G2, I think you'll be fine with the real thing. I started out the same way. When I did my first flight with my Evo, I didn't even need training gear. I felt that (removing the nerve factor) flying the G2 was a little harder than flying the real one.

So, if you're good with G2, you should be fine on your first flight.



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11-03-2004 07:58 AM  13 years agoPost 6
cjw

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UK - Cheshire

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it seems that things with the "real things" happen a lot more quickly, however that difference may be the difference between sitting in a comforable chair and knowing you can start again with a click of the mouse
That's so true. I can do almost everything in G2 (badly though ) in the comfort of my study and with no shakes at all.

On the field, the old pucker factor takes over and things seem a little more twitchy - faster etc.

Clive

http://www.cjwoods.com

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11-03-2004 01:30 PM  13 years agoPost 7
lrogers

rrKey Veteran

Mobile, Al

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Thanks fellows. I appreciate your thoughts. As soon as the new tail rotor bearings arrive, I'll see if all this sim training has helped when I try to fly my elcetric micro again. Even on the sim those fixed pitch birds are tough!

Larry Rogers - R/C Helicopter Pilot

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