RunRyder RC
 9  Topic Subscribe
WATCH
 1 page 1266 views POST REPLY
HomeAircraftHelicopterBeginners Corner › Newbie needing Desperate help@
11-02-2004 12:39 AM  13 years agoPost 1
kilodelta

rrNovice

Nor-Cal

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Newbie here, I have a HB V.2 That I can’t get to stay in one place at 50% throttle. I have trimmed and re trimmed with no luck! Some times it will slide left and I will trim it out, then it will want to slide right, then I would trim it out with the same result. The balance of the HB it self is dead on and so are the blades. I’m not sure what I’m doing wrong or if there is something out whack. So it’s my understanding that it shouldn’t slide in any direction when it’s still sitting on the ground? It would be nice to get it trimmed so I can learn how to hover!

Any advice would be GREATLY appreciated !!

Thanks in advance

PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR  Quote
11-02-2004 01:18 AM  13 years agoPost 2
greenboot

rrVeteran

Marblehead, OH

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

They don't stay in one place. That's the whole thing about helicopters, you must fly them constantly. You can't just trim them to hover in one spot. You will be continously making very small corrections to hold the hover. If you watch an experienced pilot, you may not even see it, but believe me, it takes lots of stick juggling to keep a rock steady hover.

Tom

PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR  Quote
11-02-2004 01:20 AM  13 years agoPost 3
rjflyer

rrApprentice

Valley City, Ohio (Cleveland)

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

I am not totally understanding what you are asking, Are you hovering or just sliding around on the ground? You could be just over compensating while trying to trim it out. I don't think there are many heli's out there that don't need constant input to keep then in one place while hovering. Since you are new, try to get someone to check it over to be sure it is set-up correctly. Try a simulator if you don't have one. Hovering is hard to get the hang of, it's not easy there will always be constant stick inputs

Rick...God,I love this hobby!

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-02-2004 02:49 AM  13 years agoPost 4
SkyQuest

rrNovice

North Carolina

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

When I first started trying to hover, the heli would go all over the place, sideways and backwards when it was a few inches off the ground and I thought it was not trimmed. But that is what heli's do and especially when they are in ground effect (air coming down thru the main rotors and washing around the bottom of the heli making the heli quite unstable for the first couple of inches off the ground.

"Flying on the Edge of a New Frontier"

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  Attn:RR  Quote
11-02-2004 03:06 AM  13 years agoPost 5
Slowpoke

rrKey Veteran

Dublin, OH

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Kilodelta,

As previously stated, you have to constantly fly the heli. My Raptor 30 hover hands off for about 3 seconds before it starts to drift.

If the heli is setup correctly, it should drift more or less the same direction every time. Wind could cause some bouncing around, but you should be able to hold it fairly steady.

If you find that there is no repeatabiltiy with the trim, you might check to see if the ball links are stiff, or the servos aren't up to the task. Tight ball links can prevent the controls from centering properly.

Also, make sure your control linkages follow the rule of 90 degrees. This will make sure your throws are even on both sides.

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-02-2004 03:39 AM  13 years agoPost 6
kilodelta

rrNovice

Nor-Cal

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Thanks to all of you!! This will defiantly be the site that I come to when I need help! It sounds like to me that I just need to keep practicing.

And in regards to rjflyer, at about 50% throttle the HB will just slide off to one side, mostly the left. It doesn’t actually leave the ground.

Thanks again to all of you for your help!! I am not new to R/C but heli’s are a whole new world to me!

Kirk

PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR  Quote
11-02-2004 03:48 AM  13 years agoPost 7
Slowpoke

rrKey Veteran

Dublin, OH

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Kirk,

One reason the heli will drift to the left before leaving the ground is the tail rotor is pushing the whole heli. Once the heli leaves the ground, the heli will tilt slightly to one side and counteract the pushing of the tail rotor. This is normal procedure.

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-02-2004 12:55 PM  13 years agoPost 8
w8qz

rrVeteran

Grand Rapids, MI - USA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

kilodelta wrote: "So it’s my understanding that it shouldn’t slide in any direction when it’s still sitting on the ground?"
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
That is definitely not the case - a helicopter is a bit like a cat - it doesn't like to be touched by anything. If anything on the heli is touching the ground, it won't act 'normal'. You need to get it into the air to trim it - that's where experienced help is a big plus.

The next best thing is this - get to a large, flat, smooth, (relatively) open area - in your case, a big gym floor, I'm guessing. Strap some training gear (2 wooden dowels in an X shape, with some wiffle balls at the ends) onto your skids. Lift the heli into the air a few inches, and see what it does, then set it back down - gently. Always try to set the heli down smoothly and gradually - don't 'slam' it down. Smooth collective / lift control takes as much practice as anything else. The total air time need be only 10 seconds or so. If it always goes the same direction when in the air, adjust your trims to stop the movement. If there is no obvious direction it goes, you're probably close to trimmed.

These little 'hops' will give you a chance to attempt using the controls a bit, as well. As you get more comfortable with the machine, the 'hops' can start to last longer. Keep in mind that during takeoff, the heli will probably want to go sideways, and / or spin, as long as the landing gear is touching the ground. With practice, you can quickly 'lift through' that point - but it is always there.

Another factor to develop reactions for is the delay in the control response - it won't react instantly. At first, when your brain is learning this, it is very frustrating. It takes time and practice to learn to anticipate when, and how much, of a control input is needed.

On the other hand, once you get to the point where you have some control, it's a real 'rush'!

"The helicopter is much easier to design than the aeroplane, but is worthless when done."

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-02-2004 03:09 PM  13 years agoPost 9
nojohnny101

rrElite Veteran

10 miles north of Cincy, OHIO

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

hey
all of what they have said above is so true....
when your first learning it's hard but you got to keep with it...just mostly work on keeping your eye on a spot and try to hover and keep over that....
good luck and let us know progress....


Thanks
~Will~

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-03-2004 02:30 PM  13 years agoPost 10
concept1

rrKey Veteran

Youngstown, OH

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

you are getting ground effect. the airmoving from the blades is bouncing off the ground causing turbulance. once you getover 3 feet high this will be less. but yess you will have to fly the heli continually, it will smooth out and be better once you get higher, but don't go higher till you can control it low or you will get into real trouble, you want to be able to keep in in a 3 foot box, and about 12 inches or less high. once you can do that take it to 2 feet high then 3 feet. once at 3 feet, this will take several flights maybe days or weeks, now make your box 10 feet and go from center to the outer edges and back, till you can make it do what you want every time, then go bigger again, but stay in the 3-4 feet high,

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-04-2004 06:55 AM  13 years agoPost 11
kilodelta

rrNovice

Nor-Cal

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Thanks again to you all for your great advice! I’m waiting on parts and WX before I can do anymore practicing.

I will keep you all up to date!!

PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR  Quote
11-04-2004 07:45 AM  13 years agoPost 12
thundercat

rrNovice

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Hi guys,

I'm brand-new to RC heli's and have a Hummingbird V2 too - I've also been experiencing the same problems as mentioned above and think the replies have gone a long way to explaining the problems I've been experiencing - I've been trying to learn to hover in my livingroom, inbetween dodging the coffee table, TV and ironing board amongst other things!

There is a massive tendency for the heli to slide left - I've had to compensate by extending the aileron servo arm up, meaning the swashplate at rest is tilted to the right. If what you say is right, does this mean that when my heli gets above three feet from the ground it'll just keep sliding right?

I think the message here is that to practice a hover you need space and preferably a smooth surface to land on, right?

Thanks for the help peeps!

PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR  Quote
11-05-2004 12:25 PM  13 years agoPost 13
Rappy da Raptor

rrVeteran

Dorset

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

A helicopter will hardly ever stay in one place without the input from the pilot. Someone at my club has got a micro heli and found it really hard to fly and he found that the problems he was experiencing was ground affects and also being in such a small room that the heli was greating updrafts.

His solution was to sell the heli and keep flying the I/C ones.

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-05-2004 03:06 PM  13 years agoPost 14
thundercat

rrNovice

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Are IC helicopters harder to run though? You've got all the hassle of running-in the engine, messy fuel, exhaust smoke, all the extra equipment you need for IC engines (starter, glow-plug battery and starter kits) etc. and all that on top of learning how to fly the heli in the first place?

PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR  Quote
11-05-2004 03:50 PM  13 years agoPost 15
nojohnny101

rrElite Veteran

10 miles north of Cincy, OHIO

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

hey thundercat and everyone else
it really depends on what your looking for....electric is really for your intermediate fliers and your backyard fliers...
with gas and the 2 cycle engines you are limitless...the only thing that is holding back you and your nitro heli is your skill....
your right though it is kind of a nuncence to carry around all that equipment...but everyone else including me definitly think its worth it....
another huge advantage of the nitro helis is that you can fly for however long you want....electric has batteries and all the money in the world can't buy you enough to last forever...but the gallon fo fuel ratio to the battery i think favors the nitro heli
then again you hvae to figure in the cost of fuel...but then again it's what your looking to do with your heli....there is no doubt in my mind that you get what you pay for and electric heli's have limits
these are just a few of teh +/- of which heli....but you problaby could serach and find some more posts and topics on this....just my 2 cents

Thanks
~Will~

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-05-2004 04:45 PM  13 years agoPost 16
Ringding

rrApprentice

Austria

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Also with nitro helis, the batteries rarely last longer than 5 flights. At least unless you got 4000 duralite and no digital servos which is kinda pointless.

PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR  Quote
11-05-2004 08:07 PM  13 years agoPost 17
cjw

rrVeteran

UK - Cheshire

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Agree with you, but you can top up RX flight packs pretty quick in the field, whereas electric flight packs take over an hour.

4000 Duralites with all digitals will do around 10 flights.

Clive

http://www.cjwoods.com

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  Attn:RR  Quote
11-11-2004 04:24 PM  13 years agoPost 18
GroundPounder

rrVeteran

South Africa, Cape Town

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Are IC helicopters harder to run though? You've got all the hassle of running-in the engine, messy fuel, exhaust smoke, all the extra equipment you need for IC engines (starter, glow-plug battery and starter kits) etc. and all that on top of learning how to fly the heli in the first place?
Learning to fly my Raptor 50 was MUCH easier than my electric micros( which I still can't fly)
Big heli's are STABLE.

The IC hassles?, you get used to it.
By the time you can hover, the motor is run in.
Cleaning?, excellent time to post-flight the heli.
My flight box?, have a good look at what the electric guys cart around.
My RX battery?, lasts for ages on a charge.

Pull a Rappy with a TT50 at 15000 rpm out of fast forward flight into a full vertical flare in front of you, then level it out and land it like a thistle at your feet, and then come back and ask me about electric sh... again.

GroundPounder

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-12-2004 05:40 PM  13 years agoPost 19
flaming blades

rrApprentice

hertfordshire, UK

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

simple, u r meant to be fly the heli

PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR  Quote
11-12-2004 06:25 PM  13 years agoPost 20
cjw

rrVeteran

UK - Cheshire

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Sorry but

Clive

http://www.cjwoods.com

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  Attn:RR  Quote
WATCH
 1 page 1266 views POST REPLY
HomeAircraftHelicopterBeginners Corner › Newbie needing Desperate help@
 Print TOPIC  Make Suggestion 

 9  Topic Subscribe

Tuesday, June 19 - 11:20 pm - Copyright © 2000-2018 RunRyder   EMAILEnable Cookies

Login Here
 New Subscriptions 
 Buddies Online