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HelicopterMain Discussion › servo extension, extension plug or solder
04-20-2017 03:30 PM  7 months agoPost 1
aashu

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scotch plains, NJ

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Wondering what should I do in order to extend servo wires. Is it recommended to use extensions or should I cut the existing wires near plug and solder a new wire to it (Shrink wrap) ?

Garden State, NJ

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04-20-2017 03:33 PM  7 months agoPost 2
JuanRodriguez

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The Villages, Florida

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I've done it both ways and either will work ...... but , soldering the extensions would eliminate a potential failure point assuming your soldering skills are good

Been there, done that and old enough to know better.....

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04-20-2017 04:01 PM  7 months agoPost 3
RM3

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Killeen, Texas - USA

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depends on whether or not you want to void the warranty (should it still have one) as some manufacturers are kinda picky, especially for those expensive Futaba ones... not sure about it though.

I prefer soldering them... its cleaner and like stated removes a potential failure point should vibration pull the connectors apart (without a retainer/lock).

but either work fine... ive used both methods on the same heli. Done right either works fine.

showing a preference will only get you into trouble, 90% of everything is crap...

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04-20-2017 04:08 PM  7 months agoPost 4
aashu

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scotch plains, NJ

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thanks

No warranty issues. I have some good quality thick gauge servo extensions but like you guys mentioned I am a little concerned on the connection getting loose. Will go with soldering I guess.

Skills wise, I may be just about ok to do the job but I wont call myself a pro. I have been known to ruin my daughter's ipod (It was already non functional but was good enough reason me to be blamed and get a new one)

Garden State, NJ

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04-20-2017 04:16 PM  7 months agoPost 5
Danny Calderone

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South Jersey

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Use extensions and heat shrink around them. No warranty issues, secure, and easily removable.

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04-20-2017 04:46 PM  7 months agoPost 6
EEngineer

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TX

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"should I cut the existing wires near plug and solder a new wire to it "

Do you have a "grounded tip" soldering iron?

If not, you will be applying 120VAC to the servo's wires.

Not good.

Logo 600SXs, 800XX, TDR IIs

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04-20-2017 06:06 PM  7 months agoPost 7
Danny Calderone

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South Jersey

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I do not believe you would ever see 120vac potential at the tip of a soldering iron unless there was an open neutral and a dead short to the iron around the element. Voltage leakage is ordinarily in the arena of 2 mV on the average hakko or weller most commonly used.

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04-20-2017 09:17 PM  7 months agoPost 8
EEngineer

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TX

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"I do not believe you would ever see 120vac potential at the tip of a soldering iron unless there was an open neutral and a dead short to the iron around the element."

Using a soldering iron that has a "2-prong" AC plug, try this:

Set your DVM(or O-scope) to AC mode and probe the iron's tip.

On an oscilloscope, the waveform looks like a 60hz "sine" wave....with an amplitude of ~120V.

Some people use that type of iron, not realizing what it can do to active electrical components.

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04-20-2017 11:01 PM  7 months agoPost 9
ICUR1-2

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Ottawa, Ontario

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Oh oh I have been using a 2 prong solder iron for the longest time

spending time, paying attention

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04-20-2017 11:09 PM  7 months agoPost 10
EEngineer

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TX

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If the components aren't active components then you're ok...

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04-21-2017 01:30 AM  7 months agoPost 11
ICUR1-2

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Ottawa, Ontario

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when you say active do you mean as in ON

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04-21-2017 01:48 AM  7 months agoPost 12
EEngineer

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TX

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Whether on or off...the keyword is "active" component....

Active meaning a transistor, FET, etc......not a resistor, capacitor, inductor, wire leads that are not connected to active components, etc.

The manufacturer's component data will allow one to determine if a component could take 120VAC.....depends upon the type of active component.

Why take a chance, if you can't determine this?

Use a soldering station....

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04-21-2017 04:43 AM  7 months agoPost 13
ICUR1-2

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Ottawa, Ontario

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if I needed a good iron I will definitely buy one
But for me using it a couple of times a year hmmm I dunno

spending time, paying attention

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04-21-2017 05:31 AM  7 months agoPost 14
EEngineer

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TX

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Just be careful what you solder.

I've seen people fired on the spot for using a iron like that on electronic systems....and also for not taking ESD precautions.

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04-22-2017 12:16 AM  7 months agoPost 15
PilotPin

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Indiana -- USA

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I use the 2 prong plug soldering iron all the time. If it has a 120 volts on the tip why don't I ever see any sparks come off the tip .

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04-22-2017 01:07 AM  7 months agoPost 16
EEngineer

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TX

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"If it has a 120 volts on the tip why don't I ever see any sparks come off the tip ."

Is that how one measures 120VAC?.....

Don't you have a DVM handy, instead?

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04-22-2017 02:24 AM  7 months agoPost 17
PilotPin

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Indiana -- USA

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I do have a DVM. I never use it on the tip of a soldering iron. I have touched the tip when I first plug it in to see if it's going to get hot . Ive never gotten shocked from any voltage.

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04-22-2017 03:56 AM  7 months agoPost 18
EEngineer

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TX

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You won't get shocked....burned maybe....

The voltage potential is present whether current flows or not(not in this case). And this voltage potential can damage some active components.

Soldering passive components....no problem at all....you're fine.

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04-22-2017 02:42 PM  7 months agoPost 19
KevinB

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Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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If the tip does have 120VAC, and you probe it with the positive lead of the DVM, where do you complete the circuit? Stick the DVM negative lead into the AC outlet's ground?

When I solder the battery connector onto a new ESC, I'm not grounding the ESC to earth before I start....so how is the circuit completed? If there is no path to ground, how is 120V at the tip a problem? With no completed circuit, no current flow?

Not saying you're wrong. Can you give a layman's explanation of how the damage would occur? Thanks.

KevinB

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04-22-2017 02:50 PM  7 months agoPost 20
BeltFedBrowning

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Kansas City

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I routinely use servo extensions on heicopters. I tie all connections with dental floss. I keep dental floss in my heli tools.

perfer et obdura; dolor hic tibi proderit olim

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HelicopterMain Discussion › servo extension, extension plug or solder
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