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HelicopterOff Topics › 3D Graphics Creation
04-13-2017 12:18 AM  6 months agoPost 1
Heli_Splatter

rrElite Veteran

USA

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Anyone here doing any 3D modeling. Has anyone seen the Microsoft Hololens product?

I do some 3D modeling in 3DMax Studio - Autodesk. Great product.

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04-13-2017 02:45 AM  6 months agoPost 2
okw14

rrApprentice

Morgantown, WV

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I've used Autodesk Inventor and SolidWorks for quite a few years, and I've drawn models in AutoCAD that the Autodesk sales reps didn't even think were possible with its limited 3D capabilities. Been using that for 30 years.

I found this model of an OS .91 that I posted in my gallery here more than 12 years ago. I believe I modeled it in Inventor.

Only used 3D Studio Max a couple times to draw some stuff to use in the Ghost Recon game years ago. Definitely a lot of work compared to a good modeling program, like SolidWorks, Inventor, or Pro-E. Haven't heard of the Microsoft program.


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04-13-2017 02:53 AM  6 months agoPost 3
okw14

rrApprentice

Morgantown, WV

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Here's a model of a CNC router/mill I'm making.


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04-13-2017 01:34 PM  6 months agoPost 4
Heli_Splatter

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USA

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A different route

I feel that starting with a desktop milling machine is a better starting place. Of course, it all depends on what you are making.

Hololens Link;
https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/hololens/developers

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04-13-2017 04:48 PM  6 months agoPost 5
Pistol Pete

rrProfessor

Seffner, FL

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Star Trek Holodeck is here. Sweet.

I foresee actual paying venues for the geek among us to experience such.

~~Enjoying the hobby one flight at a time~~

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04-13-2017 11:07 PM  6 months agoPost 6
okw14

rrApprentice

Morgantown, WV

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Splatter,

Are you saying that starting with a manual desktop milling machine, like a Sherline or Taig, and then converting it to CNC is better than building a machine from scratch like I did? It would definitely be easier! And if you can find a deal on a used machine to start with, it could be cheaper as well. I mainly built the one above just to see if I could do it.

If you meant starting with a manual machine before getting into CNC, I'd agree with that completely. I started using manual machines a while back and am decent at it, for a home shop machinist, anyway. I'm definitely no professional!


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04-14-2017 12:32 AM  6 months agoPost 7
RM3

rrElite Veteran

Killeen, Texas - USA

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dont go the CNC mini mill route to make a 3D printer (if thats where your going)...

Tiag and sherline are great little machines... but you are paying for a tiny machine that was designed for cutting metal and plastics.... the mill in particular as fantastic as it is the working envelope is small... X travel max on the mid priced model is 10" Y is 4" and Z is 8"... the extended version increases the X and Y axis to 13 on the X and just over 5 on the Y.... but you'll pay well over $1500 just for a CNC ready machine ... no steppers, No electronics that can add another $1000 if you use LinuxCNC (free and very capable) a $200 PC with para port and a 4 axis Gecko stepper driver, power supply etc. (built two of them one for my mill and lathe)

The CNC router you propose will be plenty good enough in terms of rigidity and accuracy BUT you will need to extend the Z axis.

Sherline and Tiag are great but the capacity just isnt there... Tiag is a little more rigid though...

cant do anything in metal bigger than 1.5" diameter on the sherline lathe without serious chatter... even then your limited to tiny cuts on either machine in metal.... plastic is easy... risers help increase stock diameter capacity but reduce rigidity further..

the mill struggles with steel and the rigidity is lacking so cutting steel is nerve racking... climb cuts are a no no (steel).. aluminum is ok... plastic no problem.

showing a preference will only get you into trouble, 90% of everything is crap...

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04-17-2017 03:38 PM  6 months agoPost 8
Heli_Splatter

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USA

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No, I am not heading to printing... I want to cut metal and printing metal is not in my cost curve.

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04-17-2017 10:34 PM  6 months agoPost 9
RM3

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Killeen, Texas - USA

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well in that case here is what i can tell you about the sherline stuff based on first hand experience owning the manual and CNC versions (mill and lathe)...

the good:
1.) its made here in the USA...
2.) ton of accessories
3.) easy to deal with in terms of portability when you have little room
4.) extremely accurate
5.) outstanding service

the bad:
1.) rigidity on "average" sized stuff is lacking, especially on the mill
2.) work envelope is small on Mill... for most RCheli stuff the lathe is OK.
3.) the "8 axis" mill is not rigid at all
4.) the lathe bore capacity is just over 10mm...
5.) Use risers with caution, they reduce rigidity further.
6.) the steppers sherline sells are overpriced and too weak.
7.) the DRO is garbage...

My impression overall on mini mills and lathes (all brands)...
buy em a little bigger than you need them...crap always comes along thats bigger than you can handle...even as a hobby.... a good cast iron framed 10 x 24 lathe max and a square column mill/drill will cover you best for RC plane/heli projects

BTW... CNC routers do a terrible job cutting anything harder than plastic... the head and frame be it gantry style or otherwise isnt rigid enough to do quality accurate work on metals without babying them to the point of lunacy.

showing a preference will only get you into trouble, 90% of everything is crap...

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04-18-2017 03:13 PM  6 months agoPost 10
Heli_Splatter

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USA

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I already own my lathe and milling machine...

This thread is really meant to be about 3D modeling, making projected models or VR systems. I would like to gently nudge the thread back in that direction.

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04-19-2017 01:03 AM  6 months agoPost 11
mdu6

rrKey Veteran

Montreal

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OS50 done a number of years back just for fun !

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04-19-2017 01:31 AM  6 months agoPost 12
AirWolfRC

rrProfessor

42½ N, 83½ W

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Any input on Inventor vs Solid Works ?

I'm trying to decide which one to get up to speed on.

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04-19-2017 03:24 AM  6 months agoPost 13
okw14

rrApprentice

Morgantown, WV

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I've had extensive use of both Inventor and Solidworks. Personally, I prefer Solidworks, but mainly because that's what I use at home and I've gotten away from modeling at work where Inventor is used. They are comparable and quite honestly, one is as good as the other. If you have access to them, you can't go wrong with either one.

My biggest disappointment with both of them is the fact that you can't simply transfer models from one package to the other without loosing the history of how the model was built and the constraints/mates that hold assemblies together.


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04-19-2017 05:16 PM  6 months agoPost 14
AirWolfRC

rrProfessor

42½ N, 83½ W

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Do you know what the restrictions are on the "educational" version of Solid Works ?

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04-19-2017 11:17 PM  6 months agoPost 15
okw14

rrApprentice

Morgantown, WV

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Not 100% certain, as I've never used it, but I believe that in the student edition you can only save files in Solidworks format (so no export to IGES or STEP files, etc), there will be a watermark on all drawings, and I don't think there are any support or upgrade options. You may also not be able to renew the license after it expires. I'm also not sure if you can open any files created in the other versions of Solidworks.

I also believe that there's another version that's for the educators, which is still limited in some ways, but not as much as the student version.

And for those that may be interested, I believe that military veterans are also eligible to purchase the student edition of Solidworks.


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04-19-2017 11:26 PM  6 months agoPost 16
AirWolfRC

rrProfessor

42½ N, 83½ W

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You get a free educational copy if you're a member of Experimental Aircraft Association.

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04-20-2017 12:59 AM  6 months agoPost 17
okw14

rrApprentice

Morgantown, WV

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Well there you go.


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04-20-2017 03:08 PM  6 months agoPost 18
AirWolfRC

rrProfessor

42½ N, 83½ W

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There you go - - - what ?

I still don't know the restrictions.

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04-20-2017 11:16 PM  6 months agoPost 19
okw14

rrApprentice

Morgantown, WV

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Um, if you're a member of EAA, get your free copy. Unless you're needing it for commercial use, it should be more than adequate. My mistake was "assuming" that since you brought up the free software from EAA, that you were a member.

I mentioned several possible restrictions (since I'm not positive about them) above for the Student Edition. What the EAA offers is called the Student Design Kit - EAA Maker Edition. Which is similar, but again, I'm not positive of the limitations of these versions of the software.

If you need something more definitive, I'd recommend contacting Dassault Systemes, or a Solidworks rep.

Here is a PDF file showing the differences between the Student Engineering Kit and the Student Design Kit. You can expect that the full Solidworks Pro or Premium versions to have at least the capabilities of the Student Engineering Kit. And likely more.

Student_Access_Product_Matrix_LB.pdf


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04-20-2017 11:35 PM  6 months agoPost 20
AirWolfRC

rrProfessor

42½ N, 83½ W

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I have vague info from the local Dessault rep. Still not sure about being able to use projects on another installation of Solid Works.

Only something about not being able to bring in a project from a "student" version to a full "paid" version. - - and what about student to student ?

and from the PDF chart - - what is "network license borrowing" ?

Yes, I am a member of EAA - - since 1975 - but I have not downloaded that Solid Works version. Would be nice to know ahead of time instead of having to experiment.

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