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HelicopterBeginners Corner › Nose-in hovering tip
02-11-2017 10:34 PM  9 months agoPost 1
yongary

rrApprentice

Nashua, NH

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Guys, I am sure many of you already know this but if you don't, please try this right now. This really works!

When nose-in hover, move the stick to the direction the helicopter is moving!

That's it!

You will love it, let me know how it went after you try this!

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02-11-2017 10:48 PM  9 months agoPost 2
fastrc1

rrKey Veteran

Brooklyn, NY-USA

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I'll add that you should be a few mistakes high in case you have a brain freeze

RIP Roman Pirozek Jr.
Team SRW Comp
Zeal Blades U.S. Flight Team
Team Futaba

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02-12-2017 05:17 PM  9 months agoPost 3
flycatch

rrApprentice

Barstow, California

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Nose in hovering affects; rudder and roll. It is called control reversal. A left command now becomes a right command. Solution to this problem is simple. Turn your head 90 degrees' to the your left. This places orientation back to flying the nose from behind the air-frame. Once you become comfortable doing this, than you slowing in stages, move your head back to the center position. This method was taught to me while learning how to fly fixed wing.

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02-23-2017 12:29 AM  8 months agoPost 4
Heli_Splatter

rrElite Veteran

USA

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I learned to fly without any of these "tricks" etc. That trick may be fine for nose in, but what about nose in inverted? What about tail in inverted.... too many tricks to remember.

I suggest just flying a lot on the sim. It will start to feel natural. No need to remember all this stuff. I particularly dislike the turning your head movements. Totally unnecessary. Do you see the top pilots doing it?

Use the same body movements of the best pilots. Use the sim more than anything. Keep using the sim to refresh. practice all 8 orientations, keep your skill current. Don't fly if you are not current.

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02-23-2017 12:42 AM  8 months agoPost 5
BeltFedBrowning

rrKey Veteran

Kansas City

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I agree. I also give the rudder trim a few clicks so I also get practice controlling the tail. It all becomes second nature with practice.

perfer et obdura; dolor hic tibi proderit olim

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03-30-2017 11:17 PM  7 months agoPost 6
artimus

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Buckley WA

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Muscle memory.....get a sim an pratice flying...not crashing

Fly Hard......Team Viagra

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03-31-2017 08:47 PM  7 months agoPost 7
Tyler

rrElite Veteran

Chicagoland area

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Steer the far side of a nose in hover with the rudder stick.

When inverted and nose in, steer the closer side with the rudder stick.

Enjoy things that money can buy IF you don't lose the things money can't buy.

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04-10-2017 05:58 AM  7 months agoPost 8
Steve Graham

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Denver, CO

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"Tricks" to help establish and maintain orientation are nothing more than techniques to help people come to terms with new motor skills that require a large amount of mental bandwidth at the early stages of their progress. They are not necessary but IME helpful. We use similar strategies in full scale flight training. It is also true that as one gains experience there is less need for the conscious bit of manipulating the sticks. Ask several accomplished pilots to describe their inputs and they will likely struggle to explain it. They are flying largely by trained reflex and no longer need the devices that beginners find helpful.

This is a real example of the difference between being able to do a thing and being able to teach a thing. Very different skill sets really. To teach we must be able to deconstruct complex things into small more manageable bits in order to build the fundamentals required for advanced processes. The cool thing is that in the process of doing this we become better at the task reaching a far deeper understanding than we would if we never thought about how to teach it in the first place.

As always YMMV

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04-11-2017 12:13 PM  7 months agoPost 9
Heli_Splatter

rrElite Veteran

USA

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I fly full size aircraft too!

The reason that I don't believe in these "tricks" is that it adds a step to the process when you may not have time for the trick and then the action. Now you have to sort and apply the correct trick...

With the cost of the sim being very low, I feel more sim flying is much preferred to a head loaded with "Tricks" for this orientation or that. Save the "Tricks" for something advanced not basic flying skills.

Learn how to get into a comfortable orientation quickly when things are going bad. Fly more, fly every day, 15 minutes a day will have you flying in no time. "Crashes" are cheap.

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04-11-2017 06:06 PM  7 months agoPost 10
Steve Graham

rrApprentice

Denver, CO

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We agree on the sim part

I use these tricks when I teach people on the sim as well. Just a mechanism that can help someone get through the earlier stages of skill progression where conscious effort is part of the equation a little more quickly. As I said not necessary but I do find them helpful.

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04-12-2017 10:44 AM  7 months agoPost 11
Richardmid1

rrProfessor

Leeds, England

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When nose-in hover, move the stick to the direction the helicopter is moving!
This is exactly how I learned nose in!!

Simply whip the tail round so the heli is nose in and note which way it drifts and gently move your stick in THAT direction.

It also helped that I did this on a small fixed pitch heli!, I learned nose in without it costing me a penny!

60% of the time, it works every time!

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04-12-2017 12:02 PM  7 months agoPost 12
MattJen

rrElite Veteran

UK

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It also helped that I did this on a small fixed pitch heli!, I learned nose in without it costing me a penny!

I used the century Hummingbird V1 and the Piccolo, very good for learning and could be flown indoors when weather was rough..

Happy memories.

Even the contra rotating ones will help with inputs.

Matt

All The Best

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04-12-2017 12:57 PM  7 months agoPost 13
Richardmid1

rrProfessor

Leeds, England

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I used the century Hummingbird V1 and the Piccolo
Mine was the Venom Night Ranger 2! Same as a JP Twister.

60% of the time, it works every time!

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05-01-2017 05:25 AM  6 months agoPost 14
old nitroman

rrVeteran

Naples florida

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When I learn to fly planks in the 70s nose at you, move stick to low wing. Worked for rudder came to me easy.

E5s and E7se,and a 766, Roban bell 222 800 superscale,450 bell 4 bladed head,gobby 380and 420 ,180cfx

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