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Century Radikal E640 - Swift 16 NX
› Who flys both, HB and IC?
12-21-2003 10:21 PM  13 years agoPost 1
Elliot330

rrNovice

Swindon, UK

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Hi All,

I'm new here...I recently bought myself a HB and a sim hoping to learn how to fly heli's :-)

I'm at the stage where I can hover ( tail in ) a Li-Pol without landing for 15 or so mins, this has taken about a week or so...oh and a few replacement tail and main rotor blades!!!

I've progressed onto forward flight about 30 metres, and then reversing back to me, only problem being, is that I am forever correcting the tail, I'm going to purchase a heading hold gyro tomorrow......

Question...at last!
I've just read an article in Rotor world, and they suggested, actually recommend that Novice's steer clear of Micro's, but never actually said why...Of you guys that are experienced and fly micros as well as larger scale types, what are the main differences between the two? Am I wasting my time learning on a micro? The micro is difficult to control, very twitchy, does this mean the larger ones are even harder! :-( I was hoping that with more weight came a bit more stabilty..

The big question, will all my hours spent on the HB, make me ready for the next step?

Cheers
Elliot

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12-22-2003 03:19 AM  13 years agoPost 2
forumguy81

rrNovice

Lake Forest, CA

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from wut i here the micros r harder to fly because they r very responsive, larger gas ones are much more stable and easier to fly. they say dont start with micros because of that, but they r actually better o start off with because parts r MUCH cheaper for a hummingbird compared to say a raptor 30. people say if u can master a micro heli, u can fly the larger ones.

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12-22-2003 03:20 PM  13 years agoPost 3
PacketStorm

rrApprentice

Atlanta, GA - USA

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I agree with forumguy, the micro's are very twitchy due to their inherently low weight and tend to be much, *much* harder to fly than the larger glow powered models. Also, flying them indoors low to the floor and walls tends to generate odd air currents you typically wouldn't see outside with the larger models. These currents again make micros difficult to keep under control.

The reason some advise against beginners staying away from the micros is because of the frustration factor. Take me for instance, I've always wanted to fly model helicopters. I'm an experienced R/C glow powered car guy (1/8th scale) and I recently decided to give it a go. So, a few weeks ago I got my Hummingbird kit and a simulator along with a pretty nice computer radio (trememdously more powerful than the 4 ch job they try to sell with the kit). My goal was to learn a micro and if I still though it was fun, sell my car stuff and get a .30 Raptor.

After about a week I'm hovering stable with the simulator and I can even nose in hover. The only time I crash the sim is when I start getting silly and goof off doing stupid tricks I don't know how to properly perform. Anyhow, thinking I've got a real good handle on the flying thing, I finally crank up the HB in the garage. (Up to this point I hadn't touched it). Well, like you I've already gone through a set of main and rotor blades! I still have a bottle of CA on the table ready for the next smash into the lawnmower handle or shelves! I lost count how many times I've repaired my blades. I still can barely hover the HB! In the sim it's a piece of cake, but the real thing is starting to make me mad. Last night my frustration reached an all time high and I almost threw the thing in the trash. The reason the "experts" advise against beginners flying micros, is because of people like me... Helicopters are hard enough to fly, but throw in a twitchy micro and it could easily scare off potential hobbyists!

I have a new appreciation for those guys in the videos who hover down a hallway with the thing barely moving side to side more than a couple of inches!

I'm digressing. While I'm certainly not an expert, I don't think you have a thing to worry about. If you are hovering through a LiPo pack for 15 minutes straight you're doing fantastic. I bet if you were to fly a .30 or .60 sized machine at this point, you'd be able to do it sitting down in a lawnchair drinking a beer! Just kidding...

Keep up the good work. The hard stuff is behind you! Now start learning to be comfortable with the heli in different orientations and you'll be doing 3D with a CP model in no time! KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK....I'M ENVIOUS!

PS

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12-23-2003 02:03 AM  13 years agoPost 4
Glenn Cain

rrApprentice

Singapore

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hey i don't have a IC machine, but my humble opinion states that i would start off with a hummingbird if i was to do it all over again.

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› Who flys both, HB and IC?
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