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› How to determine remaining battery life
08-22-2014 02:39 PM  3 years agoPost 1
HeliNutAndy

rrKey Veteran

worcester, MA USA

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I've asked this question before but never really got an answer(just a few discussions on physics) on how to check the remaining life on my packs. I am using an iCharger 406DUO. Is it possible to check how much life is left to a pack? If so, does anyone know how it can be accomplished with this particular charger? I also have an Icharger 3010B if there is a way to check with that particular charger. Any help would greatly be appreciated.

Tia,
Andy

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08-22-2014 03:18 PM  3 years agoPost 2
HeliNutAndyrrKey Veteran - worcester, MA USA - My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

I found this information on the "other" site. I never use the other site because of it being policed and my family escaped communism decades ago....

If this is inaccurate pls someone speak up:

a) Packs that are as good as new: between 0 and 5 milliOhm/cell
b) Packs that have been used dozens of times, but still feeling fairly good: between 5 and 10 milliOhm/cell
c) Packs that have been used even more, and start to feel weak: between 10 and 20 milliOhm/cell
d) Packs that almost won't hold your heli in the air anymore: over 20-25 milliOhm/cell

I also found that the Duo show IR on the main display screen.

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09-02-2014 05:28 PM  3 years agoPost 3
Rojoalfa

rrVeteran

Punta de Mata, Monagas-Venezuela

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/
/

I found several opinions on this matter.

On my opinión,, IR is a Good approximation of how healthy your pack is.

For example:
From 0 to 25mΩ, LIPO cells are Good
More than 25mΩ, your LIPO pack are getting old and old and no way back...
Be careful, old doesnt mean Bad!

For NiCD, NiMH your are going to find similar general rules...

/

Saludos cordiales,

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11-30-2014 11:16 AM  3 years agoPost 4
RussJ

rrApprentice

lockport, new york usa

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A batteries IR reading is a great way to check on the condition of your battery. Keep in mind too that smaller packs with less voltage and less mah capacity will naturally have a higher IR reading. My suggestion would be to check your packs IR when they are new or working well, then check them again as they get older or if they are giving you problems and compare the numbers. The i-chargers are pretty helpful that they can show the batteries IR reading. Also when a pack gets older and closer to the end of its life cycle it will most likely start to maybe puff or come down warm or hot after using it.

Russ

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11-30-2014 01:49 PM  3 years agoPost 5
870heli

rrVeteran

Monson Ma. USA

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What do you need to check IR.
870Heli

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11-30-2014 03:20 PM  3 years agoPost 6
RussJ

rrApprentice

lockport, new york usa

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Most of the higher quality chargers such as ichargers have a special function to check a batteries IR. They can check each individual cell.

Russ

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11-30-2014 04:28 PM  3 years agoPost 7
rcflyerheli

rrKey Veteran

Granbury, TX USA

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As has been stated, IR values do give a general idea on your cell strength. What I didn't see indicated was anything regarding the C rating and how it is involved. The higher the C rating, then expect the IR values to be in the low single digits 0, 1, 2 range. Low C packs usually run up in the 7, 8 range.

What is important is to keep a watch on the IR values for each pack. If you see them start to climb, then it does indicate that the cells are deteriorating. But you will usually also see in that case that the cells either won't balance properly, or that when you finish running them the cells will be way out of balance.

As a reference, my 6s Thors that I got before they went out of business, running is a 12s configuration, after 5 1/2 minutes of flight come down within .1v/cell balance. My newer Pulses come down closer than that, sometimes as close as .05v/cell.

Goblin 700, Trex 700DFC, Gaui X7, Logo 690SX, Logo 600SX; Trex 470 Trex 500
Amain Team Rep

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11-30-2014 06:10 PM  3 years agoPost 8
eddiscus

rrElite Veteran

Dumont, NJ-USA

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To track Battery health you would have to chart you IR when you first get your pack. The IR readings need to be taken at room temp 70 degrees to be consistent. IR readings change based on pack temperature. So Ir readings taken after a flight during a recharge really hold no consistency to ones taken at room temp.
Packs that have a higher "C" rating will typically have a lower IR value when new and packs with lower "C" ratings will have a higher IR. With a new pack you may typically see the IR# decrease after the first couple of cycles. Then it should stabilize. As the pack wears and gets old it will begin to rise and your packs ability to supply full capacity will eventually fall off.
You may want to write your IR # down once a month maybe more depending on your flying frequency.

A really true test would be to take a fully charged pack and discharge it at a fixed rate of 1C and record the voltage when you reach 80% discharge capacity. As the packs gets older this voltage at 80% will start to drop.

Logo Xxtreme 800
Logo 700
Citizen 142
Synergy 766
TDR 2

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