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08-19-2014 07:05 PM  3 years agoPost 1
epryor

rrApprentice

Grandview mo,

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Question, could my ring be going bad on my OS hyper 50? it will idle fine but, when I put it in a hover it starts losing rpms and slowly comes down to ground and then the rpms pick back up while on the ground. I have a 4 blade head and tail on this bird, I have check fuel tubing and clunk line. I have tried richen it and leaning it, still the same results everything seems fine except it want maintain a hover

Batman - Scale it up

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08-19-2014 07:45 PM  3 years agoPost 2
meowguy

rrVeteran

Saco, ME

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An indication that the ring, piston, and sleeve may be bad is if you look in the exhaust port at the ring it should not be shinny. It should look dull gray colored.

"Sweet dreams and flying machines in pieces on the ground." J. Taylor

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08-20-2014 01:09 AM  3 years agoPost 3
Gearhead

rrMaster

Vt

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it sound to me it could be your engine is over heating or the engine is not getting a good supply of fuel
still the same results everything seems fine except it want maintain a hover
with that said I wonder if it is over heating, in some conditions Hovering can really heat up an engine, so I have to ask> with the 4 Blade Head and Tail did you use a smaller Pinion Gear on the Clutch ??

first start with, making sure your head bolts and back plate bolts are tight, and make sure you carb is not sucking air at the O-Ring, you could loosen the carb screw and push down on the carb and re-tighten the screw,

and make sure the Seal is on your Glow Plug

to add,
many people (including myself) have taken the Hyper 50's carb apart and found bits of white plastic inside, these tiny plastic bits are believed to be from when the carb was assemble at the factory, and they can disrupt fuel flow inside the carb,

not saying this is your problem but it could be, you never know

Jim
Buzz Buzz Buzz

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08-20-2014 01:15 AM  3 years agoPost 4
Gearhead

rrMaster

Vt

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another thing, as a Servo get's older it can do funny things, as a servo get older it may work fine as it is receiving many Inputs, but once it is not receiving so many Inputs it can have a mind of it's own and wander, I have had this happen to a servo, so don't disregard you throttle servo

Jim
Buzz Buzz Buzz

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08-26-2014 01:56 AM  3 years agoPost 5
dkshema

rrMaster

Cedar Rapids, IA

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as a servo get older it may work fine as it is receiving many Inputs, but once it is not receiving so many Inputs it can have a mind of it's own and wander,
Common symptoms in a high-time servo subjected to lots of vibration. One of the small wires connected to the commutator typically breaks, giving the servo a dead spot. If the servo stops with one of the brushes on the dead commutator segment, it won't move when you ask it to. If you were to give it a shove to get past the dead commutator segment it will turn as it should. When turning, inertia will usually carry the motor past the dead spot as it turns.

One of the first successful loops I ever did was on an old Xcell 1001, when the elevator servo died with a broken motor wired. It made for a very exciting flight, but I did manage to get down in one piece. After I landed, I began looking at the swash while moving the transmitter right stick. I had NO elevator control, till I gave the swash a slight push.

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Is this a recent development in a motor that has seen lots of time on it? Or is it a problem with a new motor?

If you wonder about your motor's innards, there's no time like the present to take it apart and inspect it. You can look at the piston and its skirt for damage, at the cylinder walls for damage, and if you were to put the ring by itself in the cylinder and square it up with the piston, you could measure the ring gap.

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Other things to look at would be the fuel tubing inside your tank. If you're running muffler pressure, the fumes in the tank tend to take their toll on the fuel tubing, especially the inner tubing connected to the klunk. The fuel line may get real soft and collapse, it may lose its flexibility, it may develop pinholes, it can even take on the appearance of being made of small crystals about the size of salt or sugar crystals.

I re-read your post, and see that you did check the fuel line inside the tank. One more spot to check is to make sure your muffler is bolted securely to the crankcase, and not coming loose.

If you're using an in-line fuel filter, maybe it's got some goo in it. If you're NOT using an in-line fuel filter, it's time to start. I filter from the jug to the tank with my pump line, and still use an in-line filter.

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Overheating inside a fuselage is a real problem you need to consider.

-----
Dave

* Making the World Better -- One Helicopter at a time! *

Team Heliproz

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