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HelicopterOff Topics › Private Rotary Wing License
08-18-2014 09:40 PM  3 years agoPost 1
ssmith512

rrKey Veteran

Indianapolis, IN USA

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Looking for advice:

I am considering obtaining my Private Rotary Wing Pilots license. Only for the simple reason of "because I would like to". Purely recreational purposes.

I know the cost and time involved, but am wondering what would I do with it after I obtain it? Not "rich enough" to buy my own helicopter. Not sure if I can "rent" a helicopter on occasion for weekend joy rides. So I spend +/-$15K to get my license and then what?

Any advice from current pilots is appreciated. Thanks.

Steve

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08-18-2014 10:23 PM  3 years agoPost 2
don s

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Chesapeake, VA

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I've thought about the same things. I determined that (once licensed) I would be down to one hobby, and that would be 1 or 2 helo flights per month.

Kinda makes it a bucket list item.

E820, Raptor G4N, X50F/E, E620, Forza 450, and some planks.

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08-19-2014 05:46 PM  3 years agoPost 3
ticedoff8

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Morgan Hill, CA. USA

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Get your private fixed wing pilot's licence first.

Then, after you get to 100 hours of fixed wing, get your "High Performance" sign off (over 200HP, variable pitch prop, retractable landing gear).
The High Performance sign off takes about 5 hours in a complex airframe and instructor's time.

After you have the pilot's license, and depending on your skill and the instructor, it is about 15 to 20 hours to get a rotary wing sign off.

But, chances are, you will not be allowed to rent a heli "solo" until you build up about 100 to 125 hours of rotary wing time.

The "per hour" cost of training on the fixed wing is about 1/2 the cost of helicopter.

Robinson R22 Beta II VFR w/ instructor = $295 / hour
Cessna 172 VFR w/ instructor = $175 / hour

Either the heli or the fixed wing will take about 40 to 60 hours of training to get a full pilot's license.

Believe 1/2 of what you see and none of what you hear.
Fake News will be the downfall of our Republic!

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08-20-2014 12:48 AM  3 years agoPost 4
ticedoff8

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Morgan Hill, CA. USA

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I think you can fly this one without a full Pilot's License.
I think they call it a "Sportsman License"

Rotorway:
http://www.rotorway.com/index.php

But, only fly during daylight hours and within 100nm of the airport

Believe 1/2 of what you see and none of what you hear.
Fake News will be the downfall of our Republic!

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08-20-2014 01:36 AM  3 years agoPost 5
chopper37

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NJ and Long Island

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As said previously Get your fixed wing pvt lic first then just add on heli lic it's like two for the price of one

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08-20-2014 01:42 AM  3 years agoPost 6
Gearhead

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Vt

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I think you can fly this one without a full Pilot's License.
I think they call it a "Sportsman License"
Rotorway:
http://www.rotorway.com/index.php
But, only fly during daylight hours and within 100nm of the airport
as I know ? the "Rotorway" is considered "Experimental"

the old rule is it can not contain more than 5 gallons of fuel, maybe that has changed , and I don't think they are allowed to fly over cities or houses or people

Jim
Buzz Buzz Buzz

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08-25-2014 11:29 PM  3 years agoPost 7
wakeboarder2342

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USA

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Im assuming ticedoff8 isn't a pilot because most of what he said isn't really true.

A "High performance" sign off just requires a plane over 200HP and can be done in an hour or two. If you want a "complex" sign off then you need a constant speed prop, retract, ect. It can also be done in a few hours.

I am about 1/2 way done with my rotary add on and its going to take about 30 hours. The problem is Robinson requires 20 hours of duel instruction before you can solo, so if your going to use an R22 don't plan on 15-20 hours as it isn't possible.

I do agree I would get the fixed wing first and then add on the rotary.

favorite quote, no honey thats the same helicoptor i have always had

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08-26-2014 01:41 AM  3 years agoPost 8
Gearhead

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Vt

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edited
R22, I don't care what any one says about the R22, I would not fly in one,,, why you ask ??

because,, I was in the hobby shop here and there was 2 guys in there, these 2 guys were a bit large (225, 235 ??), just a bit large, they were asking about heli parts,, well I got talking to them and come to find out one of them flew full size, well I asked him about all the bad words out there about the R22 and the guy said> when he was leaning to fly in Florida he was learning in the R22 (and he added) that on hot days over 110 degrees the R22 would not lift off the ground. the R22 just could not lift the weight of 2 men of their size in that kind of heat.

keep in mind this is hear-say, but that's what the guy told me,, that was back around 2005

Jim
Buzz Buzz Buzz

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08-26-2014 03:44 PM  3 years agoPost 9
wakeboarder2342

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USA

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No one would ever claim that an R22 could lift 2 220lb plus guys on a hot day.

Even at 180lbs I wouldn't fly in one on a 100+ degree day. I have done all of my training in an R44 and it is a far better platform.

But the same holds true with it, I wouldn't put 4 guys in it either unless they were all very small and the density altitude was low.

favorite quote, no honey thats the same helicoptor i have always had

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08-26-2014 04:52 PM  3 years agoPost 10
scott s.

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Orange, Ca.

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If you get one of these i don`t think you need a license
http://www.personalrotorcraft.com/

Not promoting this guy but I saw him fly at IRCHA and he`s pretty good.

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08-26-2014 07:09 PM  3 years agoPost 11
sincity

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Pasco, WA

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Wow. Guess it dates me, but I went for my commercial multi-engine back in 93. Multi-engine aircraft with instructor was $95 and I thought that was pretty hefty. Renting a 172 without instructor was $45. Jet Ranger was $400, Bell 47G was $130 with instructor.

I sooo wanted to go for my heli license but it was and I believe still is 3 times more expensive and much harder to find a job if you're looking to work in the field.

Waiting for the day I have soooo much disposable income to pick it back up. 3 kids, a wife, and a house, plus other small hobbies isn't going to allow it for a while. Granted my small hobby is running a crotch rocket around a track really fast!

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08-26-2014 07:20 PM  3 years agoPost 12
Gearhead

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Vt

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Scott, see my first reply,,

the Mosquito also is "Experimental"
the old rule is it can not contain more than 5 gallons of fuel, maybe that has changed , and I don't think they are allowed to fly over cities or houses or people

Jim
Buzz Buzz Buzz

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08-26-2014 07:23 PM  3 years agoPost 13
Gearhead

rrMaster

Vt

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wakeboarder2342

thanks

Jim
Buzz Buzz Buzz

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08-27-2014 03:29 PM  3 years agoPost 14
unclejane

rrElite Veteran

santa fe, NM, USA

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Scott, see my first reply,,
the Mosquito also is "Experimental"
Two of the Mosquito models meet the requirements of part 103 (the Air and XEL) and can be flown with no certificate or medical under that part. The others exceed part 103, so those have to have an airworthiness cert and the pilot has to be certificated also.

Unfortunately, the engine used in the Mosquito rules out the ultralight versions for me and that I can't hold a class III medical anymore rules out the others.

My trex 700 and 800 FPV ships are probably as close as I'll ever get, at least in this life. Fortunately, they're a lot cheaper to operate...

I'll just remain a planker in full scale, looks like...

LS

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08-27-2014 03:37 PM  3 years agoPost 15
unclejane

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santa fe, NM, USA

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I think you can fly this one without a full Pilot's License.
I think they call it a "Sportsman License"
You're thinking of Sport Pilot - this is a limited set of rules for both aircraft and pilots. Unfortunately, the SP rule doesn't include helicopters (gyros are permitted tho), so you can't fly a (non-103 compliant) helicopter under the SP rule.

FAA may grant an exemption to the class III medical requirement (promised by the end of this year, but you know how that goes) for recreational, day VFR flying, tho. This might include helicopters - I hope. Maybe that'll allow private pilots to fly helis under some restrictions without medicals - that'd be the only way I could get a rotary wing addon to my PPL, for example...

LS

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08-27-2014 03:54 PM  3 years agoPost 16
unclejane

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santa fe, NM, USA

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As for the OP, I agree that it'd be much cheaper to do your primary training in a plank first. Learning to control the aircraft is really only about the first half of the PPL training - the second part is navigation, rules and regs, required cross-countries and etc., most of which basically will be the same when done in a plank.

OTOH, you'll then have to switch gears afterwards and relearn helis when getting an add-on. If you do it all at once doing your private from the ground up in a heli, you won't have to go through that transition later.

So it's kind of a 6-of-one, half-dozen-of-the-other situation, though I'd still lean towards getting the cert in a plank first.

It just depends on if a helicopter is financially within reach (and of course, if you can pass the class III medical). If it is, hell, go for it in a heli....

LS

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08-28-2014 02:16 AM  3 years agoPost 17
wakeboarder2342

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USA

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Just to give you an idea of the costs I am paying about 550 per hour for the R44 I have been training in plus instructor its more like 600-625 per hour.

The R22 runs about 1/2 that but I wanted the added safety of the R44.

figure I can get my add on in about 30 hours so around 20k all in.

favorite quote, no honey thats the same helicoptor i have always had

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08-29-2014 06:49 PM  3 years agoPost 18
Glenn Goodlett

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California

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Full scale is just like rc in that the cost to get where you want to be is about 2 or 3 times your original estimate.

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HelicopterOff Topics › Private Rotary Wing License
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