RunRyder RC
 9  Topic Subscribe
WATCH
 2 pages [ <<    <    ( 1 )     2     NEXT    >> ] 2852 views POST REPLY
HelicopterMain Discussion › how to Land a Helicopter After Your Pilot Has Been Killed
11-06-2013 03:59 PM  4 years agoPost 1
Brokenlink

rrElite Veteran

Oakdale

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Lets say you are taking that once-in-a-lifetime helicopter tour of the Grand Canyon, when suddenly a Red Flocked Booby smashes through the windshield, incapacitating your pilot. If you, the non-pilot, find yourself in the unenviable position of being in a helicopter without a pilot, you're going to have to land. With some mental preparation and a whole lot of luck you may be able pull this off.

Steps 1 Get the pilot off the controls.
He will likely be slumped-over pushing the stick forward. This will cause the helicopter to go nose forward into the ground.
A person sitting behind the pilot will be of great value here. They can reach forward and hold the pilot back.
Pull him back against his seat and lock his seat belt. Many aircraft have handles on the reels of the lap belt, by your hips. Flip this handle and the seat belt will lock him in place. Alternately, you can try yanking the shoulder harness forward to trick it into locking up (like when you slam the brakes in your car).
2Familiarize yourself with the controls. Unfortunately the odds of having the second set of controls installed in the helicopter on a tour is slim to none, so this is where you plummet to your death screaming.
Cyclic: The main control stick coming up between your legs is called the cyclic. Push forward, the nose goes down. Pull back, the nose goes up. Push left, the helicopter banks (or tilts) left. Push right, bank right.
Pedals: The pedals on the floor control the tail rotor. Push the left pedal to turn the nose left, push right to turn the nose right. You use these to keep the noise pointed forward. If you want to turn the helicopter, use the cyclic; adjust the pedals only as necessary to keep the nose from being cocked off to one side or the other.
Collective: The stick coming out of the floor by your left thigh is the collective. It makes the rotor blades blow more or less air. When you pull up on the collective all the rotor blades rotate slightly so that each blade takes a bigger bite and more airflow is induced through the rotor system.
Throttle: The throttle that controls engine speed is usually found as a motorcycle-like twist-grip on the collective, or as an overhead lever between the two pilots. In almost all helicopters the throttle is automatic. Before takeoff you set it to 100% and leave it there the whole time. So don't mess with the throttle.
Radio and intercom: On the cyclic there is likely a trigger (think Top Gun, "too close for missiles, switching to guns.". Different helicopters work different ways. Sometimes you pull the trigger half-way to use the intercom, and all the way to talk on the radio. Other times you push up for intercom, and squeeze the trigger for radio broadcast. There is also, usually, a floor switch that looks like the old-fashioned high-beam floor switch in a car. This will also work either the intercom or radio. If you have time and the aircraft is under control, play around with these and see if you can talk to someone.
read the rest here,it's funny
http://www.wikihow.com/Land-a-Helic...Has-Been-Killed

Jamie Griffith

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-06-2013 04:07 PM  4 years agoPost 2
bkervaski

rrElite Veteran

Birmingham, AL, USA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

I've put together this simplified guide in case there is no time to do the above:

Step 1 - Put your head between your legs
Step 2 - Kiss your a** goodbye

Team Synergy Factory Specialist / Scorpion / Thunder Power / Byron's Fuels

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-06-2013 04:45 PM  4 years agoPost 3
jbjones

rrVeteran

Columbus, Mississippi

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Ha! Bill, that's interesting. Reminds me of a book I read 20 or so years ago about a helicopter pilot in Vietnam (W.T. Grant, "Wings of The Eagle" ).

He had it all planned out. If the worse happened, that he knew he couldn't fly out of, he had stated he'd pull his flight suit down and sit on the cyclic stick; Where the force of the impact would drive the stick through his ..rear, and out of his mouth. He said the reason for this method of "flying", was that if he was going to die, he might as well give the investigators "something to wonder about".

Of course he wasn't serious. The whole book is full of excerpts like the above. A great read if you're into history and combat helicopter pilots.

Although, Brokenlink's method is quite more usable than W.T's

-Joey

J. B. Jones

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-06-2013 05:08 PM  4 years agoPost 4
bkervaski

rrElite Veteran

Birmingham, AL, USA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

I left out step 3, cry like a baby and pray to God .. which is probably what I would do .. not necessarily in that order lol

Team Synergy Factory Specialist / Scorpion / Thunder Power / Byron's Fuels

PM  EMAIL  HOMEPAGE  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-06-2013 05:08 PM  4 years agoPost 5
Harpy

rrNovice

Columbus, Oh

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

When I as in the OHNG we had a Kiowa the hit an owl which came through the chin bubble and all the guts hit the pilots visor. They did an emergency landing to check things out.
I think the early Cobra's had single flight controls for the pilot and none for the gunner. If the pilot was hit the gunner was just along for the ride. At some point they added dual controls and the gunners were trained to fly.

PM  EMAIL  Attn:RR  Quote
11-06-2013 11:40 PM  4 years agoPost 6
torque

rrKey Veteran

bolivia , north carolina

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

one night when I flew medevac I was over southern ohio at about 1800 agl. I was cutting along at about 160mph. I heard a loud bang. I thought something in back exploded. I asked the guys they said all was fine. I checked the gages and all was in the green. I landed at a hospital and unloaded the patient. when we got ready to head back to base it was about 3am. the flight medic said there was a hole in the co-pilot wind shield, it was about the size of a 9 in. pie pan. replacement for the wind shield was $6,000. I had hit a good size bird.

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-07-2013 01:24 AM  4 years agoPost 7
warrior29

rrApprentice

Jacksonville, FL

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

When I was an instructor at Ft Rucker, AL, one of the other instructors had a huge turkey buzzard come through the windscreen of his TH-56 jet ranger knocking him unconscious. The student took the controls and made an emergency landing. That's when you find out how good an instructor you are. Instructor survived with only lacerations to his face.

Credit card can't be max'ed I have more up grades to buy!

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-07-2013 01:34 AM  4 years agoPost 8
heli-cuzz

rrElite Veteran

Pittston, Pa. USA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

I'll have to remember that for the next time I go on a heli tour.

Fury 55 NIB Furion6 CGY750 fbl helicopter-Frenzy CGY750 fbl nitro-Frenzy fbl NOBAR90

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-07-2013 01:41 AM  4 years agoPost 9
NQNA

rrElite Veteran

USA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Dual controls are rarely installed during passenger flights.

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-07-2013 01:44 AM  4 years agoPost 10
Retired2011

rrElite Veteran

Lee's Summit, MO

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

I'm taking my DX8 next time I go for a ride in a heli.

Chet

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-07-2013 02:02 AM  4 years agoPost 11
mcfast

rrKey Veteran

Quebec Quebec Canada

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

(I'm taking my DX8 next time I go for a ride in a heli.)

And if you still crash, ever buddy will say your DX8
Had a brown out

P.S. sorry for the spelling or the grammar I am dyslexic!

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-07-2013 02:21 AM  4 years agoPost 12
Retired2011

rrElite Veteran

Lee's Summit, MO

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Never heard of a TX having a brown out.

I figure I'd have just as good of a chance with a TX as I would if I tried to land a real heli.

Chet

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-07-2013 03:57 AM  4 years agoPost 13
jgunpilot

rrKey Veteran

Pollock, LA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

When I was an instructor at Ft Rucker, AL, one of the other instructors had a huge turkey buzzard come through the windscreen of his TH-56 jet ranger knocking him unconscious.
It's actually a TH-67 "Creek". I bet you were a great "instructor."
I think the early Cobra's had single flight controls for the pilot and none for the gunner. If the pilot was hit the gunner was just along for the ride. At some point they added dual controls and the gunners were trained to fly.
All Cobras had dual flight controls. The front seat had a very unique, short set of side hand flight controls that took some getting used to, but were actually quite fun to fly with. The "gunners" go through the same flight school as everyone else. That has always been the case. They were always able to fly and had controls at their disposal. It was up to the pilot in command where he wanted to fly from unless certain missions required him to fly from the rear.

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-07-2013 06:19 AM  4 years agoPost 14
bikersurgeon

rrNovice

Monett, MO-USA

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

I have pondered this scenario and wondered how much better the odds of a successful landing by an experienced rc heli pilot would be compared to someone who wasn't any sort of pilot

TT .90 TOW, TT x50, TT 50se, Ergo 60, TT .50 apache, MT cobra, MT, Trex450, 450 airwolf, TT .30,

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-07-2013 06:30 AM  4 years agoPost 15
Justin Stuart (RIP)

rrMaster

Plano, Texas

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Interesting article. Thanks for posting.

Avant RC
Scorpion Power Systems
Thunder Power RC
Kontronik Drives

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-07-2013 02:45 PM  4 years agoPost 16
torque

rrKey Veteran

bolivia , north carolina

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

old hippie, taking your DX8 on your next full scale heli ride, very funny.

you guys are right seldom are the dual controls installed. I use to give the flight medics and nurses stick time if they were installed. I would say that if a person was in a heli and the pilot was disabled the best chance of surviving would be to just try to keep the heli level, gently push down the collective, and attempt a run on landing in a grass area.

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-07-2013 03:03 PM  4 years agoPost 17
Justin Stuart (RIP)

rrMaster

Plano, Texas

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Hey torque, since you're obviously a med-evac pilot, can you answer a question for me? Why do you guys always prefer to fly at around 200ft AGL? Seems to me that given the limited glide-slope for autorotations, it would make more sense to fly at a lot higher altitude. Do you fly that low because it's more exciting? Or is there some rationale for it?

Avant RC
Scorpion Power Systems
Thunder Power RC
Kontronik Drives

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-07-2013 03:11 PM  4 years agoPost 18
reddragon

rrElite Veteran

Brooklyn, N.Y.

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

To quote Spock . . . FASCINATING.

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-07-2013 06:50 PM  4 years agoPost 19
torque

rrKey Veteran

bolivia , north carolina

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

Justin,

good question. I never flew at 200agl. if I did I would hit a mountain. I flew medevac in west Virginia. like you said higher is better. I would fly high, unless I had a strong head wind.

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
11-07-2013 08:39 PM  4 years agoPost 20
wrongler

rrProfessor

Brewerton, New York

My Posts: All  Forum  Topic

how to Land a Helicopter After the Pilot Has Been Killed
I think I would first grab the transmitter out of his hand and hit throttle hold and auto that bad boy to the ground.

Bill Whittaker

PM  EMAIL  GALLERY  Attn:RR  Quote
WATCH
 2 pages [ <<    <    ( 1 )     2     NEXT    >> ] 2852 views POST REPLY
HelicopterMain Discussion › how to Land a Helicopter After Your Pilot Has Been Killed
 Print TOPIC  Make Suggestion 

 9  Topic Subscribe

Thursday, May 24 - 4:32 pm - Copyright © 2000-2018 RunRyder   EMAILEnable Cookies

Login Here
 New Subscriptions 
 Buddies Online