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HelicopterMain Discussion › Carbon fiber mixing arms?
05-31-2013 04:33 AM  4 years agoPost 1
3kidzheli

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columbia, ms usa

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Instead of glass filled plastic arms why not carbon fiber? I realize aluminum is available but wouldn't cf be WAY better than plastic? Plastic actually has flex in it (not enough to cry over) and cf doesn't on the rigid side. Thoughts? Irrelevant of pricing.....

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05-31-2013 05:13 AM  4 years agoPost 2
RM3

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no gain to be had really...then the threads in any part of the CF will also not hold...CF is great stuff, but it has its place...not sure if the mixing arm is one of them.

showing a preference will only get you into trouble, 90% of everything is crap...

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05-31-2013 05:47 AM  4 years agoPost 3
3kidzheli

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Ball links with thread all the way and retainer nut on back? Helacoil maybe inserted into cf?

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05-31-2013 10:00 AM  4 years agoPost 4
IYKIST

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Some manufacturers used carbon fibre or G10 for bell cranks, it saved money on machining aluminium in the early days, machining metal has become a lot cheaper these days so they don't bother much using composite fibres.

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05-31-2013 10:09 AM  4 years agoPost 5
3kidzheli

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Gotcha that makes sense.

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05-31-2013 11:54 AM  4 years agoPost 6
Jeff polisena

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westpalmbeachflorida usa

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The carbon fiber products are strong but when you start flexing back and forth you get fatigue . Aluminum takes a lot more abuse and if it starts to fatigue it will show signs before failing .

I stole it ,flew it and gave it back ;)

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05-31-2013 12:22 PM  4 years agoPost 7
3kidzheli

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Not sure there is enough pressure on the mixing arms to worry about fatigue??? cf is way stronger than plastic mixing arms I was not targeting the aluminum components. Most arms could have a larger center mass, like bending a piece of plywood edge ways ya can't do it but side ways it's flexible. But the arms don't have side force. Unless there is an engineering scientific mathematical calculated hypothesis that some one has on their chalk board (I'm sure somebody does) to prove they have side force! hehe well if so post it on here!

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05-31-2013 02:25 PM  4 years agoPost 8
dkshema

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Cedar Rapids, IA

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Ball links with thread all the way and retainer nut on back? Helacoil maybe inserted into cf?
Much more expensive per piece than an injection molded fiber reinforced plastic part. The engineered plastic part does the job well, and is less cost to produce.

Cost in the plastic part is in producing the mold. That's a non-recurring cost. Cost in the CF part is per part - machining, cutting, perhaps threading as you suggest, and even if you could use a helicoil, that's added cost of material, and you still have to install it. That's all recurring cost.

You can buy replacement plastic mixing levers for a few dollars. Or you can buy some cool anodized, CNC parts for $25 - $35. It's not the cool blue color that makes the CNC parts more expensive than the injection molded plastic parts that function just as well.
But the arms don't have side force
Once you place a ball on the arm, it will see torque and it will flex. The applied force is offset from the mixing lever's center line. There is a couple formed by the distance between the center of the ball and the center line of the mixing arm. You will see torque on the arm along its axis between the base of the ball and the pivot point of the arm.

There is really no advantage to using CF just for CF's sake.

-----
Dave

* Making the World Better -- One Helicopter at a time! *

Team Heliproz

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05-31-2013 08:32 PM  4 years agoPost 9
3kidzheli

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Cool I new there was some body that could prove they have side torque! yeah I also knew that the cost would be higher. I just figured with some people "cosmetics of coolness" might be marketed. Plastic does work yup! Although I did not give the technical production of cf arms consideration. Thanks.

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HelicopterMain Discussion › Carbon fiber mixing arms?
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