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HelicopterAerobatic FAI F3C F3N Contest › Will we ever see a young FAI/F3C pilot?
02-03-2012 03:35 AM  6 years agoPost 1
VDUBS

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Moorestown, New Jersey

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With 3D being the more prevalent of the two, I wonder if we will ever see any young guys coming up wanting to learn FAI/F3C?

Quicksilver

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02-03-2012 03:51 AM  6 years agoPost 2
Dood

rrProfessor

Wescanson

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Nick Maxwell isn't exactly what I'd call "old."
Jamie Robertson has expressed an interest in contest flying in a video interview.

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02-03-2012 04:30 AM  6 years agoPost 3
VDUBS

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Moorestown, New Jersey

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Age
I was thinking more Justin Chi age...lol I like that Nick M & Chen Z do both.

Quicksilver

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02-03-2012 04:49 AM  6 years agoPost 4
GootyS

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Gauteng South Africa

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16 yrs is our youngest.

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02-03-2012 05:21 AM  6 years agoPost 5
rexxigpilot

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Florida

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Since stabilization systems will soon be allowed, that should reduce the price of entry. I'm sure more younger guys will give it a go if they don't have to spend a fortune on blue anodized aluminum head parts.

Let's face it, even 3D gets boring after you do the same routine over and over again. It just becomes like anything else that takes the magical 10,000 hours to get good at it, it feels like work.

Once some of these younger guys find out just how difficult it is to do the maneuver correctly, they will want the challenge. IMO, elimination of most of the hovering maneuvers would help allure the youth too.

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02-03-2012 11:07 AM  6 years agoPost 6
unclejane

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santa fe, NM, USA

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Actually, 3D now bores me instantly as soon as the heli does it's first hop. Once you've seen your billionth tick-tock, it really loses something...

OTOH, seeing a FBL heli sitting still or doing a precision maneuver gets and holds my undivided attention, mainly because it's so hard to do.

So I also think allowing FBL and 3-axis gyro equipment into the sport should be the first priority. I don't see why hovering maneuvers should be eliminated but that's just a personal preference. And I'm old too, so I'm not one of the ones trying to be attracted to the activity either lol.

But ever since I lost the flybar, precise hovering has become the hardest part. So I'd love to see that continue.

LS

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02-03-2012 12:12 PM  6 years agoPost 7
Al Austria

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Gainesville, FL

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It's like anything else, it's usually interesting if you do it, and not interesting if you don't. It's a matter of appreciating what is involved with either discipline.
OTOH, seeing a FBL heli sitting still or doing a precision maneuver gets and holds my undivided attention, mainly because it's so hard to do.
I feel the same way when someone performs a perfectly stationary pirouetting flip, and even more so a chaos because it is, also, extremey difficult to do...

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02-03-2012 02:55 PM  6 years agoPost 8
VDUBS

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Moorestown, New Jersey

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Hovering manuevers
I feel totally opposite about hovering doing the diamond and pirouetting at the same time between the flags really interesting to me...I think part of the reason 3d gets boring is because now everyone is doing it and a lot of them are really good at it as well. I remember when I first started doing 3D, everyone stopped flying to watch Alan Szabo Jr fly....Now you can walk up and down the flight line of any Heli event and pretty much see that kind of 3D flying. I have noticed at Ircha that a lot of the flying 10 inches off the deck seems to have lost it's luster, more big manuevers now which I like as well.

Kyle

Quicksilver

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02-03-2012 05:54 PM  6 years agoPost 9
Dr.Ben

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Richmond, VA, USA

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A lot of the distinction between really top level 3D and everyday stuff is the ability to do any and all manner of maneuvers not only WHEN you choose to do them bit also WHERE you want to place them. A lot of times the guys that seem like they are really tearing it up are simply flying from one maneuver to another will little regard or control for where it all takes place as long as it doens't end up in the ground. Contrast that to the likes of Nick Maxwell who can execute and place anything maneuver in the book exactly as he desires. When you watched the likes of him long enough, it becomes more apparent that everyone out there really isn't doing the same thing after all.

Ben Minor

Peak Aircraft/Team Minicopter Team Futaba Team Kontronik USA

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02-03-2012 06:01 PM  6 years agoPost 10
Mr. Heliguy

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Jakarta, Indonesia

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I'm 14 and happily flying F3C , I don't see anything boring about it, it's challenging and a lot of fun at the same time

Regards,

Adriel Mesias Simorangkir
INA 0975

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02-03-2012 10:01 PM  6 years agoPost 11
Four Stroker

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Atlanta

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Not long ago a guy was complaining that he joined a club in Japan - and nobody did 3D.

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02-04-2012 12:32 PM  6 years agoPost 12
unclejane

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santa fe, NM, USA

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I'm with Ben on this one. It's kind of like when I eventually learned to put my full scale down on the centerline every time vs just getting it down on the runway somewhere (usually way off to the left). It's harder to do than it looks like and took quite a few more hours to get down than the initial skill of just learning to land period.

Similarly, I've seen some 3D pilots able to do all kinds of flips, tick-tocks and other maneuvers but they can't hold a simple nose-in hover to save their lives.

Then you have pilots like me who can hover nose-in great and can kind of auto, but can't do much else without a crash lol.... But we're not talking about my level of skill here lol....

But I have to agree, even tho 3D isn't my thing and bores me even if it's Matt Botos doing it, it's still definitely precision flying. You can tell when a really accomplished pilot is flying 3D that it's actually very well controlled.

I think that aspect should still attract more pilots to F3C, once the equipment requirements are modified to allow FBL. I've always been a flybar enthusiast but have now gone FBL for other reasons - it'd be great to be able to practice on it knowing I could eventually try to compete with it.

LS

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02-11-2012 07:16 PM  6 years agoPost 13
Salesmanheliboy

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Nashville, TN

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I had the privilege to be the FAI/F3C team manager last year held in Italy.

I think there would be a lot of surprised people in the US to have witnessed some of the younger (and highly talented) contest pilots competing; some were even part of the Jr. championship criteria.

When I started in this hobby, there were fun fly's but not like today. Most of us would fly the contest maneuvers or do some "task" oriented maneuvers.

I think 3D flying is popular because it's fun with really no pressure to perfect a maneuver (although many pilots work on improvement)and there is very little (other then F3N) criteria for a perfect maneuver. In other words, I can do a chaos and you can do a chaos and there is a great deal of subjectivity to decide who's was superior. Now I'm not saying that's bad; not at all. I feel this is the foundation of what makes the 3D thing fun!

While I don't see a full circle coming (and I think that would not be positive anyway), I do see a small quiet number of growing pilots that want to explore this style of flying most refer to as "FAI style".

(Back to Italy), Several countries represented had one or more "world class" 3D pilots on their F3C flight team (all young guys). I think experience in each discipline really makes a better pilot (for a number of reasons).

One of the reasons we don't develop a large amount of young contest pilots has to do with the lack of mentoring (inside the FAI style of flying). I don't know about all countries but I've been told that the Japanese will help mentor young pilots and encourage them to practice F3C. If you have not watched the current WC (Ito) fly 3D, look him up and hold on!

Tim

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03-07-2012 06:03 PM  6 years agoPost 14
Shortman

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Portland, Oregon

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I am going to jump into F3C this year... only issue I see is actually going to events somewhere on the west coast. I don't see a single event anywhere besides out east or in the midwest :/.

I am going to use a JR NEX E8, don't quite got the money for a Slyphide

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03-07-2012 07:06 PM  6 years agoPost 15
Santiago P

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South West, Ohio

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That is because no one is running a contest in the west coast. It is a bummer for a guys like you and that just implies you will have to travel.

Shortman,
What class are you starting on?
You did not mean straight into F3C?

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03-07-2012 07:17 PM  6 years agoPost 16
RappyTappy

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Traveling the USA

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If you are bored doing 3D, then you are doing it wrong.

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03-07-2012 09:05 PM  6 years agoPost 17
Shortman

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Portland, Oregon

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Money I am not jumping straight into F3C, I will probably start in Class II or III.

Chris, I did IMAC and 3D competitions for airplanes for years and it is still fun, I plan on doing both 3D and precision flying. I just like the idea of having a set criteria to fly from, freestyle is judged very different as has been noted above. I am always looking to improve my flying skill set.

Fortunately my job has me training all this summer on the east coast up in Vermont, so if there are any FAI competitions going on up around there I can make it, otherwise I will have to plan for just the NATS event in August.

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05-27-2012 02:39 PM  5 years agoPost 18
WreckRman2

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Orlando, FL

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If you want more attention the fai classes should not be the same boing stuff. They should eliminate or drop the hover to a single maneuver, maybe two because hovering is a huge part of flying a heli and add more current type maneuvers to the schedules. Think of XFC styles with metered difficultly. One said tic tocs are boring but so is hovering... Can you do a stationary 4 point tic toc? It could easily be added to a class 3 schedule. My point being is you will never gain attention if the rest of the hobby is moving forward and fai is staying the same.

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David Smith
407.937.9556

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05-27-2012 02:46 PM  5 years agoPost 19
WreckRman2

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Orlando, FL

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I think Gordy really tried to make a move towards more challenging maneuvers last year but also took a lot of slack for it. I remember one discussion about how a loop shouldn't be in class one. A loop!

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David Smith
407.937.9556

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05-27-2012 03:32 PM  5 years agoPost 20
Dr.Ben

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Richmond, VA, USA

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The ongoing challenge for maneuver selection is extraction of a balance for those in the lower classes who either lack anything but basic flying skills or who are looking at doing this stuff because they dislike 3D against trying to tap the youth who learn at an exponential rate. A lot of the problem is that competition flying of any time comes down to a ton of practice and travel to events which is not inexpensive. I am going to be very interested to see if F3N is going to make any headway here in the US. No claim can be made that it does not address the most current flying styles, but whether guys be willing to spend at least a several days per week practicing both set maneuvers and a freestyle program plus an average of $450-500 per weekend type event are other matters entirely.

Ben Minor

Peak Aircraft/Team Minicopter Team Futaba Team Kontronik USA

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HelicopterAerobatic FAI F3C F3N Contest › Will we ever see a young FAI/F3C pilot?
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